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Thread: Kurds Anticipate Western Support As Erodgan Increases Threats

  1. #1
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Kurds Anticipate Western Support As Erodgan Increases Threats



    ISTANBUL — Turkey’s president on Tuesday ramped up his criticism of a historic Kurdish referendum for independence, calling it “treachery” against Turkey and threatening to impose a stifling blockade of the Kurdish enclave in northern Iraq.

    The comments by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan were the latest in a series of dire admonitions by Turkish officials and other regional leaders over Monday’s vote that many Iraqi Kurds see as a critical step toward their long-deferred dream of self-determination.

    Turkey’s warnings — which have included the use of military force — have raised concern about another flash point emerging in a region roiled by civil wars and the fight against the Islamic State.

    The results of the nonbinding referendum have not been fully tallied, but officials expect an overwhelming “yes” on independence — the first step on a possible path toward a break with Baghdad.

    The vote was opposed by virtually all of the Kurds’ allies and neighbors, including the United States and Iran. Turkey, which has fought for decades against Kurdish separatists at home, has reacted with growing anxiety as Kurdish groups have gained in strength and influence across its borders in Syria and Iraq.

    In a sign of the regional reverberations from the referendum, thousands of Iranian Kurds demonstrated in towns and cities in western Iran Monday night, defying their government's opposition to the vote in a show of Kurdish solidarity.

    The Kurdish Democratic Party of Iran, which is based in Iraq, posted video from the demonstrations on social media, showing crowds marching and chanting the Kurdish anthem.

    Kurds in Iran have long complained of discrimination, and Iranian authorities worry that fallout from the referendum could stir further unrest.


    Erdogan’s barbed comments on Tuesday appeared to be part of a broader international effort to shape the vote’s aftermath, and push the Kurdistan Regional Government and the Iraqi government of Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi toward an accommodation the region could live with.

    Erdogan, speaking in the Turkish capital, Ankara, warned that Turkey could cut off oil exports from northern Iraq and stop trucks from moving across the border. “They will not find food or clothing,” he said. “When we implement our sanctions, you will be left out to dry.”

    Note: Is this possible, geographically?

    Iraq’s Kurdish region also borders Syria and Iran, but Turkey is the main commercial lifeline to international markets.

    “At a time when our relations were at their best level in history, and to make this decision without any kind of consultation and meeting beforehand, is frankly treachery to our country,” Erdogan said.

    But even as Turkey continued to denounce the referendum, Western nations began to soften their tone. The United States and United Kingdom both pledged not to downgrade relations with the Kurdish government.

    In a statement, the State Department said the United States “is deeply disappointed” that the regional government held the vote but that the “historic relationship with the people of the Iraqi Kurdistan Region will not change.”

    It did reiterate, however, the U.S. belief that the referendum “will increase instability and hardships for the Kurdistan region and its people” by compromising relations with Baghdad and neighboring countries. Washington also fears that the plebiscite could give extremists an opening to exploit.

    Britain's ambassador to Iraq, Frank Baker, said in a Twitter post on Tuesday that his country's long ties with the Kurdish government will continue, including in the battle against the Islamic State.

    The British and U.S. statements appeared to validate views by Kurdish leaders ahead of Monday's vote: that Western countries would eventually moderate their opposition and likely lean on Baghdad to continue negotiations with Kurdistan.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...=.e6b6a96392e5

    Fuck Erogan. That Stalin-esque shitbag should not BE a US ally.



    I want the US to support independence for the Kurds, whose human rights have been violated by every nation in which they have ever dwelled. I can't see that doing so will raise the specter of even more ISIS extremists in the area.

    Increasing human rights are not usually an inspiration to make war.

    Your thoughts?
    Thanks from Tedminator

  2. #2
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Russia is now Iraqi Kurdistan's biggest financial sponsor, essentially: The Kurdistan independence referendum

    So far, Putin has not really said much about this. Am waiting to hear when he does...
    Thanks from Madeline

  3. #3
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    Russia is now Iraqi Kurdistan's biggest financial sponsor, essentially: The Kurdistan independence referendum

    So far, Putin has not really said much about this. Am waiting to hear when he does...
    Jeeze Louise. I want the U.S. to support human rights overseas at least as much as Putin does.
    Thanks from The Man

  4. #4
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    Jeeze Louise. I want the U.S. to support human rights overseas at least as much as Putin does.
    Putin is supporting Russia's oil interests, not human rights lol

    Not that the US is any different, certainly when it comes to Iraq...
    Thanks from Madeline

  5. #5
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    Putin is supporting Russia's oil interests, not human rights lol

    Not that the US is any different, certainly when it comes to Iraq...
    This new nation of Kurdistan will have big oil reserves?

    Good for them.

    Are they Muslim, @The Man? They don't look especially Arabic.

  6. #6
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    This new nation of Kurdistan will have big oil reserves?

    Good for them.

    Are they Muslim, @The Man? They don't look especially Arabic.
    The Kurds currently control some of Iraq's best oil fields. That's why this is such a hot ussue lol

    And yes, majority of Kurds are Muslim, both Sunni AND Shiite. There are also Yazidi Kurds.

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