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Thread: Malala's homecoming

  1. #11
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    ^^ you trying to put words in my mouth?

    OK, I am ...if that will make you happy

    Anything for you, bro! ;-)

  2. #12
    Cat-tastic Babba's Avatar
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    I had no idea there was such resentment over Malala moving to the UK. Regardless, she has continued to work for the education of girls. She's brought a lot more attention to the issue than there would be otherwise. Some people just can't be satisfied.
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  3. #13
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Thread Ban Notice

    Darkman has been banned from this thread. Please do not respond or refer to his posts.

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  4. #14
    Praguematic Helena's Avatar
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    Even if she were just a randomly shot student, or a grown man / soldier, I would never sneer at her experience, and that is not to mention the work she's done.

    Hero are those kids who chose to go back to APS after attack. Hero are those girls who continue their education in Swat where she was shot.
    It kind of shocks me and cracks me up at the same time that anyone who isn't an active Taliban supporter would belittle the courage and accomplishments of anyone, let alone a TEENAGE GIRL, who fights for education despite death threats and continues to do so after the death threat has been damn near fulfilled. Oh, she only had to have part of her skull removed and (IIRC) temporarily stored under her abdomen skin so that her swollen brain could expand without dying on the process, and after that experience, she has continued to work and travel around the world to stand up for other kids who want to go to school, while death threats against her and her family remain in place. She sure took the easy way out. Nothing to see here, just another "celebrity," indeed.
    Thanks from Babba, Minotaur, Panzareta and 2 others

  5. #15
    Praguematic Helena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babba View Post
    I had no idea there was such resentment over Malala moving to the UK. Regardless, she has continued to work for the education of girls. She's brought a lot more attention to the issue than there would be otherwise. Some people just can't be satisfied.
    I happen to know several people working for the Pakistani government and I would say all of them genuinely admire Malala. I can't say all of them are PROUD of her though (even though some definitely are, to the point of distributing copies of her book everywhere they can), because her story obviously highlights some of the aspects of the Pakistani society that no educated Pakistani can take pride in. So while Malala has received several awards in her homeland too, some of her (enlightened) fellow citizens would certainly prefer for her to keep quiet. Yet another piece of evidence showing how "easy" she has it.
    Thanks from Babba, labrea, Panzareta and 2 others

  6. #16
    Veteran Member Isalexi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minotaur View Post
    Good to know that soldiers shot in the head are not heroes. I don't think you know the story and probably think she was just an unlucky student who was randomly shot.
    Probably thinks she’s a liberal...she’s also brilliant so that proves she’s “elite”
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  7. #17
    Chaos in fourteen lines Minotaur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isalexi View Post
    Probably thinks she’s a liberal...she’s also brilliant so that proves she’s “elite”
    I messed up on my read.

  8. #18
    Chaos in fourteen lines Minotaur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    Even if she were just a randomly shot student, or a grown man / soldier, I would never sneer at her experience, and that is not to mention the work she's done.

    It kind of shocks me and cracks me up at the same time that anyone who isn't an active Taliban supporter would belittle the courage and accomplishments of anyone, let alone a TEENAGE GIRL, who fights for education despite death threats and continues to do so after the death threat has been damn near fulfilled. Oh, she only had to have part of her skull removed and (IIRC) temporarily stored under her abdomen skin so that her swollen brain could expand without dying on the process, and after that experience, she has continued to work and travel around the world to stand up for other kids who want to go to school, while death threats against her and her family remain in place. She sure took the easy way out. Nothing to see here, just another "celebrity," indeed.
    I fully agree with you. I feel so bad for misreading your original post. That will teach me not to skim just because I am busy. Thanks Helena.
    Thanks from Wonderer

  9. #19
    Praguematic Helena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minotaur View Post
    I fully agree with you. I feel so bad for misreading your original post. That will teach me not to skim just because I am busy. Thanks Helena.
    No hard feelings.

    Here's an interesting opinion piece:

    Malala Yousafzai is one of the world’s best-known figures, a Nobel prizewinner and a global advocate for female education. She went from being a schoolgirl in the Swat valley of Pakistan to a global figure, all before the age of 20, and throughout she has maintained an almost preternatural poise and unwavering loyalty to her home country. Last week she returned to Pakistan for the first time since she was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman six years ago. Yet her visit was marred by a grotesque coordinated campaign, where private school teachers announced an “I am not Malala” day. Children were made to wear black armbands, hold up placards and sit through lectures on why Malala should be condemned.

    This is not a recent phenomenon. Almost from the moment she was shot, conspiracy theories swirled around the young girl. As Malala lay in her hospital bed, half her head shattered, the whispers started. The shooting was all fake so that she would be granted asylum in the west. Her father had coordinated the whole thing. She was taking advantage of the situation in order to make money by portraying Pakistan as a place of perpetual victimhood, feeding western stereotypes.

    Inevitably, there were allegations that it was all a CIA conspiracy to undermine Pakistan and sully its reputation abroad. The more Malala’s stature increased, the more feverishly she was attacked. The reaction is not confined to trolls or particularly conservative parts of Pakistan society. It has crossed over into the mainstream, where even in liberal circles people snidely cast aspersions on her. It has all gone rather too well for her, hasn’t it? And her father, who pushed her into the limelight and put her at risk: he is just a bit too pushy, is he not? Of course, no one is suggesting that the poor girl wasn’t shot at all, but one can ask who is financing it all.

    It’s enough to shake your faith in humankind that this is the reception Malala experienced. Yet sadly her example is not unique. Attacks on spokespeople for obviously virtuous causes are not confined to countries in the grip of tribalism or religious fundamentalism. They often take place in liberal, less feudal societies.
    From Malala to Parkland, why are the victims demonised?

    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...inner-pakistan
    Thanks from Babba and Blueneck

  10. #20
    Shut up and vote Addiction Solitaire Champion, Double Deuce Champion, Queen Jewels Champion, Ray Ray Shuffle Champion, Twins Champion, Blow Up: Arcade Champion, Bunch - Time Trial Champion, Znax Champion, Zoo Keeper Champion, Sobics School Champion, Swap a Smiley Champion, Makos Champion, Dino Drop Champion, Flower Frenzy Champion, Some Puzzle Champion, Funny Bubbles Champion, CubeZ Champion, Dinky Smash Champion, Fun Fun Animals Champion, Fruit Fabriek Champion, Raft Wars Champion, Rainbow Monkey RunDown Champion, Raft Wars Champion, Crime Puzzle Champion Blueneck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    I happen to know several people working for the Pakistani government and I would say all of them genuinely admire Malala. I can't say all of them are PROUD of her though (even though some definitely are, to the point of distributing copies of her book everywhere they can), because her story obviously highlights some of the aspects of the Pakistani society that no educated Pakistani can take pride in. So while Malala has received several awards in her homeland too, some of her (enlightened) fellow citizens would certainly prefer for her to keep quiet. Yet another piece of evidence showing how "easy" she has it.
    I follow her on Twitter, and she keeps a pretty low profile most of the time. Certainly not what I'd call an attention whore.
    Thanks from Babba

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