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Thread: The Labor Movement

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    The Labor Movement

    Teddy Roosevelt was a republican president who helped to end the brutal beatings and murder of labor being committed by private security and U.S. military. More than a hundred years later republicans are now anti-labor who support and justify private security and the military breaking the back of labor.

    Labor is what made America great so even if we had a third party (labor party) the duopoly will continue to use private security and the military to brutalize and murder any labor movement. The labor revolt will also have to include a civil war against all the anti-labor, white christian males who want to destroy America so bad that they elected Trump.

    Power concedes nothing without a demand.
    ~Frederick Douglass
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    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Teddy Roosevelt was a progressive and deeply committed to the interests of the "common man".

    But I didn't know he stopped/slowed down the attacks. How did he do this?

    There were actual police by 1917, correct?
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    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Famous attack on workers protesting, Haymarket Square Riot, was in 1886, and involved the Chicago police.

    So by 1917, were private forces like the Pinkertons still being hired to attack workers?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    Teddy Roosevelt was a progressive and deeply committed to the interests of the "common man".

    But I didn't know he stopped/slowed down the attacks. How did he do this?

    There were actual police by 1917, correct?
    The government's brutal history towards labor before the coal strike of 1902 shows how Teddy's involvement saved quite a few lives.

    On Friday, October 3, 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt called a precedent-shattering meeting at the temporary White House at 22 Lafayette Place, Washington, D.C. A great strike in the anthracite coal fields of Pennsylvania threatened a coal famine. The President feared "untold misery . . . with the certainty of riots which might develop into social war."1 Although he had no legal right to intervene, he sent telegrams to both sides summoning them to Washington to discuss the problem.

    Roosevelt, who had been injured a month earlier when his carriage was hit by a trolley car, sat in his wheelchair pleading with representatives of management and labor. "With all the earnestness there is in me . ..," the President urged, "I ask that there be an immediate resumption of operations in the coal mines in some such way as will . . . meet the crying needs of the people." He appealed to the patriotism of the contestants to make "individual sacrifices for the general good."2

    This meeting marked the turn of the U.S. Government from strikebreaker to peacemaker in industrial disputes. In the 19th century, presidents, if they acted at all, tended to side with employers. Andrew Jackson became a strikebreaker in 1834 when he sent troops to the construction sites of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal.3 War Department employees operated the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad during the Civil War .4 In the violent rail strikes of 1877, Rutherford B. Hayes sent troops to prevent obstruction of the mails.5 Grover Cleveland used soldiers to break the Pullman strike of 1894.6

    https://www.dol.gov/general/aboutdol/history/coalstrike
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    Famous attack on workers protesting, Haymarket Square Riot, was in 1886, and involved the Chicago police.

    So by 1917, were private forces like the Pinkertons still being hired to attack workers?
    I'll have to read up on that. I was making the connection to the private police used at Standing Rock to show how history is repeating itself.
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    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chaos View Post
    I'll have to read up on that. I was making the connection to the private police used at Standing Rock to show how history is repeating itself.
    There were "private police" at Standing Rock????

    That appears to me to be FLAGRANTLY illegal, if true.

    But hell. The oil companies and the government clearly did not care about violating the protesters' civil rights, at all.

    A real black mark on Obama's administration. And even Bernie was silent about it far too long.
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    From Wikipedia
    Union busting with police and military force
    For approximately 150 years, union organizing efforts and strikes have been periodically opposed by police, security forces, National Guard units, special police forces such as the Coal and Iron Police, and/or use of the United States Army. Significant incidents have included the Haymarket Riot and the Ludlow massacre. The Homestead struggle of 1892, the Pullman walkout of 1894, and the Colorado Labor Wars of 1903 are examples of unions destroyed or significantly damaged by the deployment of military force. In all three examples, a strike became the triggering event.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    There were "private police" at Standing Rock????

    That appears to me to be FLAGRANTLY illegal, if true.

    But hell. The oil companies and the government clearly did not care about violating the protesters' civil rights, at all.

    A real black mark on Obama's administration. And even Bernie was silent about it far too long.
    Not only Standing Rock but also on the eminent domain in Nebraska for the pipeline to go through and for the stealing of land for fracking in Pennsylvania.
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    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    There were "private police" at Standing Rock????

    That appears to me to be FLAGRANTLY illegal, if true.

    But hell. The oil companies and the government clearly did not care about violating the protesters' civil rights, at all.

    A real black mark on Obama's administration. And even Bernie was silent about it far too long.
    Not for nothing, but I can't truthfully call Standing Rock a "labor dispute".

    But the vicious government thuggery involved was certainly shocking. Reminded me of the 1968 Chicago convention, etc.

    And it was an aberration. Nothing like that happened after the 1970's, that I know of.
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    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chaos View Post
    From Wikipedia
    Union busting with police and military force
    For approximately 150 years, union organizing efforts and strikes have been periodically opposed by police, security forces, National Guard units, special police forces such as the Coal and Iron Police, and/or use of the United States Army. Significant incidents have included the Haymarket Riot and the Ludlow massacre. The Homestead struggle of 1892, the Pullman walkout of 1894, and the Colorado Labor Wars of 1903 are examples of unions destroyed or significantly damaged by the deployment of military force. In all three examples, a strike became the triggering event.
    The Posse Comitatis Act was originally passed in 1878. Rutherford Hayes was president at the time.

    I am no expert and don't know why this law was adopted, but I understand that it prohibits the use of U.S. military on US soil, in any conflict.

    Anyway....point is, I never even heard of actual soliders being used to keep the peace in the U.S. before Standing Rock.

    This was reported anecdotally, but the claim was, US Army troops were blockading, etc.

    Actual active duty soliders.

    I guess all bets really are off, as to the new government thuggery.
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