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Thread: Coulter thinks students shouldn't be allowed to vote

  1. #11
    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idiocracat View Post
    I noticed you didn't say 'all three', but yes, once they saw that their core income came from stimulating the ignorant, they stepped up their games..
    What all three?

  2. #12
    Civis americanus borealis Singularity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PACE View Post
    I think you are right, there is more at stake for millenials, than there were for boomers; boomers did a great deal of harm in their swing to and fro in their political opinions. But from what I hear from millenials, they are rightfully sick and tired of the divide, they don't want the daily pap of political leanings to color the landscape, there are bread and butter issues for them, jobs, growth, environment, civil rights. They are not as enamored of the "winner take all" attitude, I see it, and they are marvelous at developing hacks to get by. They remind me of the greatest generation without the war to burnish their image.
    The idea that the Boomers started out super progressive and swung to the right, except on certain social issues, is largely a myth. Boomers have always been sympathetic to right wing visions about most aspects of the government, they just mostly didn't recognize or formalize that sympathy until later in life. Born to an era of unprecedented prosperity, the Boomers have always sought to keep what is theirs as a top priority. Even my unusually (by the family's standards) progressive uncle holds those who are dependent on the state *for anything* in the lowest regard, and my father has tended to agree with him despite my best efforts.

    Conversely, millennials have grown/are growing up in an era of relatively much higher scarcity and much higher need for the average citizen to undertake tests, debts and obligations to secure their share of the pie. They are more dependent on the state than past generations, but that's not some fuckin gravy train, as most of us know: The state is in fact our primary creditor, and its student debt cannot be waived or delayed in payment except under the most extraordinary circumstances, and it uniquely can NEVER be discharged in bankruptcy proceedings.

    There is also a stereotypical, but nonetheless correct, generational rebellion factor: That we have had to endure this is largely the Boomers' fault, it is their policies and irresponsibility which caused the financial crisis and why Wall Street retains the share of power that it does. And now they have elected, by the barest margin and over our emphatic objections, a fucking carnie to the highest office based on his miraculous snake oil and in defiant ignorance of his personal and political failures?

    The strongest steel is forged in the hottest fire, and that is the determination of my generation to not tolerate this crap.
    Thanks from Panzareta and Claudius the God

  3. #13
    A Blue Dog Jets Fan Jets's Avatar
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    Not for anything but Coulter is nothing more than a shock jock. Different day, different "attention getting" comment.

    Meh

  4. #14
    Member allegoricalfact's Avatar
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    She is sort of right ---------------- with so many uninformed, uneducated, inexperienced people voting it is no better than mob rule - which is what democracy is really ---- but what a mob!

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    Junior Member Idiocracat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    What all three?
    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    I think we all can see that Trump isn't republican, he's not anything, he's Trump.

    As for Coulter, well she is just kind of getting out there, reminds me of what happened to Glenn Beck.

    They both started out well but then seem to lose it.
    ................

  6. #16
    Civis americanus borealis Singularity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jets View Post
    Not for anything but Coulter is nothing more than a shock jock. Different day, different "attention getting" comment.

    Meh
    You're correct, but on this issue she is foreshadowing what's to come, and it will be a struggle. As the current Republican coalition, which is unusually old by historical standards, continues to age and thus lose its share of the vote, calls to pause or even end the franchise for more and more people who aren't like them will get louder.

    The counter-culture movement is so legendary for arising to the abject horror of the greatest and silent generations, but that was about culture, personal conduct, and social concerns. Millennials have already made a political and ideological break from their forebears that is vastly under-reported and entails much more significant practical change across communities, geography, and class divisions.

    Coulter I think will always be on the fringes, and I don't expect any natural born U.S. citizen to lose or see a significant delay in the franchise, but she is *on* the fringes, and closer to the mainstream among her peers than ever before. She is not outside of serious thought.

  7. #17
    A Blue Dog Jets Fan Jets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by allegoricalfact View Post
    She is sort of right ---------------- with so many uninformed, uneducated, inexperienced people voting it is no better than mob rule - which is what democracy is really ---- but what a mob!
    Interesting point. Having the right to vote and the results there of are beyond fascinating!

  8. #18
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Singularity View Post


    Under 30 vote, 2016 ^
    Is there no one under 30 in Montana, Nebraska or Alaska? And what is going on in Kansas, with the light blue?

  9. #19
    Civis americanus borealis Singularity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jeffrey View Post
    Is there no one under 30 in Montana, Nebraska or Alaska? And what is going on in Kansas, with the light blue?
    That means the state would go Democratic by less than 5 points. Gray means it would be a tossup.

    I was actually surprised, Kansas hasn't voted for a Democratic president since 1932. But given recent events in my home state, it is believable that there are more people there fed up with Republicans than say in, Wyoming.

  10. #20
    Veteran Member PACE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Singularity View Post
    The idea that the Boomers started out super progressive and swung to the right, except on certain social issues, is largely a myth. Boomers have always been sympathetic to right wing visions about most aspects of the government, they just mostly didn't recognize or formalize that sympathy until later in life. Born to an era of unprecedented prosperity, the Boomers have always sought to keep what is theirs as a top priority. Even my unusually (by the family's standards) progressive uncle holds those who are dependent on the state *for anything* in the lowest regard, and my father has tended to agree with him despite my best efforts.

    Conversely, millennials have grown/are growing up in an era of relatively much higher scarcity and much higher need for the average citizen to undertake tests, debts and obligations to secure their share of the pie. They are more dependent on the state than past generations, but that's not some fuckin gravy train, as most of us know: The state is in fact our primary creditor, and its student debt cannot be waived or delayed in payment except under the most extraordinary circumstances, and it uniquely can NEVER be discharged in bankruptcy proceedings.

    There is also a stereotypical, but nonetheless correct, generational rebellion factor: That we have had to endure this is largely the Boomers' fault, it is their policies and irresponsibility which caused the financial crisis and why Wall Street retains the share of power that it does. And now they have elected, by the barest margin and over our emphatic objections, a fucking carnie to the highest office based on his miraculous snake oil and in defiant ignorance of his personal and political failures?

    The strongest steel is forged in the hottest fire, and that is the determination of my generation to not tolerate this crap.





    Totally agree with this statement, but I will add, that it was boomers who brought in ERA, Women's rights, while the churches and the progressives of the early sixties brought in civil rights, and of course, the shaming of the presidency (vis a vis Nixon) was a combination of boomers and the greatest generation.

    But I agree, with your statements concerning millenials, they are going to have to deal with the fallow earth left to them; and they will find a way to better themselves, but that betterment may be different than the typical American dream scenario; tiny homes is a clear indication of how that mind set is changing, no mortgage, more freedom. Well, that's a kick in the ass to the standards, isn't it? not really, it's very much like the greatest generation and their "levitt town" mentality. Sure everyone wants a better future for their offspring, but I would argue the irresponsible actions of the boomers in the decades starting with the 1980's laid the groundwork for what we reap today; in fact, I am sure of it.

    Which is why I bucked the trend personally, I started a college fund for offspring LOOOOOONG before I had any, I never borrowed against any home, refused to engage in the get rich quick shit of the 1980's, or the conspicuous consumption.

    And now, my daughter enters life college debt free, with a nice little nest egg for unforeseen costs like health insurance, and a healthy dose of financial support for her first home, if she so chooses. To me, following the trending was less important than being responsible.

    There's nothing I can do about health rights, but I will continue to push against that tide, it's a small one, but vocal. And insofar as civil rights are concerned? well, I haven't changed. and no, I don't blame the poor like many of my jaded, disease ridden boomer brethren do.

    Regards
    Pace

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