Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 69
Thanks Tree34Thanks

Thread: Dealing with our immigration crisis.

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    1,852
    Thanks
    2566

    From
    Massachusetts

    Dealing with our immigration crisis.

    For years, the US has been suffering with a crisis of falling levels of immigration. This endangers America's cultural identity as a nation of immigrants -- already we've fallen nearly eight percentage points behind Canada, in terms of the share of our population made up by immigrants, and we also trail Germany, Austria, Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, and several other top nations. Switzerland, for example, has about twice as many immigrants as we do, in proportion to total population. This is setting us up for a major crisis when it comes to entitlement spending. Like all wealthy nations, we have experienced a serious reduction in fertility rates, which puts us in a position where our dependency ratio will be in terrible shape in the coming generation, as Baby Boomers move into retirement and there are not enough working-age residents to support them. With immigrants being disproportionately young, an influx of new residents can balance the demographic equation, but not at the anemic rates of immigration we've had in recent years.

    The good news is that, as serious as this crisis is, it's a crisis of our own making, which can easily be remedied. Step one is simply to take a page from Reagan's playbook and grant undocumented residents legal status, to entice them to stay long term and integrate them more fully with our economy. Then step two is to make it easier for them to sponsor family members to come here in larger numbers, through chain migration. This will have the advantage of preserving intact family units, minimizing the social disruption that comes from having immigrants who aren't well supported, socially, by extended families and communities. It will also have the advantage of disproportionately attracting immigrants from the bottom of the economic ladder, where they will be less likely to displace US workers (instead, largely displacing automation as well as doing work like housekeeping and landscaping that would otherwise often be unpaid or not be done at all). These lower-end workers, in addition to remedying our serious demographic imbalance, will also provide upward pressure on the economic escalator -- slotting in below current workers, allowing more current workers to grow into management roles and higher-skill positions.

    Addressing our crisis of low immigration will also help to bring crime rates down, since immigrants commit crimes at lower rates than US natives. It will also help to remedy localized labor shortages, since immigrants are less tied to existing US communities, which means they are more likely to flow to areas of unmet demand, rather than sitting in whatever place they were born and demanding government intervention in the economy to make work for them (the way, say, coal workers do). More immigration would mean more labor that's driven by actual demand, rather than by cultural nostalgia and partisan politics.
    Thanks from The Man, Babba and BitterPill

  2. #2
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    38,522
    Thanks
    23495

    From
    Toronto
    According to a 2015 UN report, US was number one in the world for number of immigrants, followed by Germany, Russia, Saudi Arabia, and UK, in top 5: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ant_population
    Thanks from rwb72

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    1,852
    Thanks
    2566

    From
    Massachusetts
    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    According to a 2015 UN report, US was number one in the world for number of immigrants, followed by Germany, Russia, Saudi Arabia, and UK, in top 5: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ant_population
    The relevant consideration, though, is immigrants per capita, not raw immigrant count.
    Thanks from The Man, Friday13 and Babba

  4. #4
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    38,522
    Thanks
    23495

    From
    Toronto
    Quote Originally Posted by Arkady View Post
    The relevant consideration, though, is immigrants per capita, not raw immigrant count.
    True. Russia's number, for example, includes, I believe, all the Millions of migrant laborers from Central Asia: Migrants made World Cup happen

    But many of them are not actually even permanent immigrants, they work for a contract term and go home to their families in the -stans at the end of that term. The ones working on the farms in the Southern regions are seasonal too. So, yeah, flawed numbers there...
    Thanks from Friday13

  5. #5
    Veteran Member
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    31,968
    Thanks
    371

    From
    Tennessee
    Do it legally!

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    1,852
    Thanks
    2566

    From
    Massachusetts
    Quote Originally Posted by roberthughey View Post
    Do it legally!
    What I've set out is a concept for doing it legally: amnesty followed by greatly enhanced chain migration.

  7. #7
    Junior Member Slartibartfast's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    1,634
    Thanks
    506

    From
    UK
    Started in 1620 and has got worse year by year.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    1,852
    Thanks
    2566

    From
    Massachusetts
    Quote Originally Posted by Slartibartfast View Post
    Started in 1620 and has got worse year by year.
    It started before that, with Jamestown (and Popham, for that matter). "Worse," in this case, is the decline of immigration rates in recent years, in the context of a demographic situation where we should have been striving to increase immigration.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    1,852
    Thanks
    2566

    From
    Massachusetts
    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    True. Russia's number, for example, includes, I believe, all the Millions of migrant laborers from Central Asia: Migrants made World Cup happen

    But many of them are not actually even permanent immigrants, they work for a contract term and go home to their families in the -stans at the end of that term. The ones working on the farms in the Southern regions are seasonal too. So, yeah, flawed numbers there...
    I think Russia’s in a different situation than us given the level of poverty and unemployment they have. If we were as hard up as them, I’d be more apprehensive about migrant labor.
    Thanks from The Man

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Joined
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    9,959
    Thanks
    1650

    From
    Banned
    Quote Originally Posted by Arkady View Post
    For years, the US has been suffering with a crisis of falling levels of immigration. This endangers America's cultural identity as a nation of immigrants -- already we've fallen nearly eight percentage points behind Canada, in terms of the share of our population made up by immigrants, and we also trail Germany, Austria, Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, and several other top nations. Switzerland, for example, has about twice as many immigrants as we do, in proportion to total population. This is setting us up for a major crisis when it comes to entitlement spending. Like all wealthy nations, we have experienced a serious reduction in fertility rates, which puts us in a position where our dependency ratio will be in terrible shape in the coming generation, as Baby Boomers move into retirement and there are not enough working-age residents to support them. With immigrants being disproportionately young, an influx of new residents can balance the demographic equation, but not at the anemic rates of immigration we've had in recent years.

    The good news is that, as serious as this crisis is, it's a crisis of our own making, which can easily be remedied. Step one is simply to take a page from Reagan's playbook and grant undocumented residents legal status, to entice them to stay long term and integrate them more fully with our economy. Then step two is to make it easier for them to sponsor family members to come here in larger numbers, through chain migration. This will have the advantage of preserving intact family units, minimizing the social disruption that comes from having immigrants who aren't well supported, socially, by extended families and communities. It will also have the advantage of disproportionately attracting immigrants from the bottom of the economic ladder, where they will be less likely to displace US workers (instead, largely displacing automation as well as doing work like housekeeping and landscaping that would otherwise often be unpaid or not be done at all). These lower-end workers, in addition to remedying our serious demographic imbalance, will also provide upward pressure on the economic escalator -- slotting in below current workers, allowing more current workers to grow into management roles and higher-skill positions.

    Addressing our crisis of low immigration will also help to bring crime rates down, since immigrants commit crimes at lower rates than US natives. It will also help to remedy localized labor shortages, since immigrants are less tied to existing US communities, which means they are more likely to flow to areas of unmet demand, rather than sitting in whatever place they were born and demanding government intervention in the economy to make work for them (the way, say, coal workers do). More immigration would mean more labor that's driven by actual demand, rather than by cultural nostalgia and partisan politics.
    What a crock, there is no immigration crisis. Here in the 21st century working age population growth has outpaced the number of new jobs created. That is proven not only by the data, but also evidenced by the drop in labor participation rates.

    One of the big issues with US citizens leaving the labor force has been the erosion of wages. A stone mason should make $30+ hour, illegal immigrants willing to work for a fraction of that have made it extremely difficult for an honest person to legally make a decent living framing houses or installing drywall.

    After a decade of anemic economic growth the economy is finally building momentum. The labor market is tightening and employers are finally being forced to raise wages and salaries to attract workers. Market forces are working, last month 600,000 Americans re-entered the workforce. Three times as many required to fill the 200,000 new jobs created. That is 600,000 Americans that want to contribute to the economy and make their own way instead of continuing to be a drag on the system.

    I'm cool with legal immigration, but why would we want to flood the market with unskilled labor that do nothing but tamp down recovery, keep wages and salaries depressed and put the future of our next generations in jeopardy? Not to mention the negative effect that population growth has on the environment.
    Thanks from rwb72 and Sparta

Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 30th January 2017, 05:13 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 7th September 2014, 12:54 PM
  3. Replies: 106
    Last Post: 1st August 2014, 01:26 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 9th July 2014, 07:00 AM
  5. Looks like Bush is to blame for the immigration crisis
    By Blueneck in forum Legal Issues
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 8th July 2014, 02:44 PM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed