Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 37
Thanks Tree55Thanks

Thread: SC manufacturer says it's closing plant over Trump tariffs

  1. #11
    New Member BigBob's Avatar
    Joined
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    490
    Thanks
    473

    From
    My house
    SURVIVING THE TRADE WAR

    Central Valley farmers ‘caught in the middle’

    As midterm election looms for crucial races, many feeling the sting from President Trump’s tariffs
    By Casey Tolan newsgroupcom ctolan@bayarea

    Nervous walnut farmers watch the price of their crops drop by the day. Dairymen worry about delayed shipments as tariffs mount. Orange sellers fret about their fruit spoiling while it waits for inspections at Chinese ports. As harvest season fast approaches in the Central Valley, farmers are feeling the pinch from President Donald Trump’s trade War — injecting a new issue into crucial congressional races up and down the region and stoking fears among Republicans that it could hurt them in November.
    Trump has levied tariffs on a host of products from around the world, and countries such as China, India, Mexico and Canada have responded by targeting U.S. farmers, slapping their own taxes on imports from America’s breadbasket. That makes U.S. crops more expensive overseas, reducing demand and cutting into farmers’ bottom lines. California is in the cross-hairs: In 2016, the Golden State exported just over $2 billion in agricultural products to China, with the largest exports being pistachios, almonds, wine, oranges and dairy, according to the California Department of Food and Agriculture. All of those crops have a large presence in the Valley. Some farmers are fuming as agriculture markets are shaken by the disputes. “This seems to be a game of ‘I dare you’ from the White House, without a strategic plan,” said Mark McAfee, a dairy farmer in Fresno, registered Democrat and ‘California Farmers Union board member. “We’re caught in the middle.” . The administration has proposed $12 billion in aid for farms affected by the trade dispute, including direct payments to farmers and a program to purchase surplus crops. But the U.S. Department of Agriculture has said the payments would be targeted for soybeans, corn, wheat, and other crops that are more common in the Midwest, not “specialty” crops such as from the almond and citrus trees that line vast swaths of the Valley. Trump has urged farmers to be patient, saying his aggressive approach on trade is necessary to win American exports a better deal — a stance many farmers sympathize with. “Our farmers are true patriots,” Trump declared at a rally in Tampa, Florida, on Tuesday. “You know what our farmers are saying? ‘It’s OK, we can take it.’ ” But Republican members of Congress from the Valley, several of whom are facing tough re-election races, are walking a tightrope: raising concerns about the tariffs’ impact and pushing for more aid while avoiding any real criticism of the president, who’s still deeply popular with most of his party. Rep. Jeff Denham, R- Turlock, said in an interview that the retaliatory tariffs have had a negative “immediate impact” on his district, but that the president’s trade policies would be helpful in the long term. “Nobody wants the tariffs,” Denham said, “but I think everybody I’ve talked to understands that there’ve been imbalances and un- fairness that have happened in many of these countries.” That doesn’t convince voters like John Casazza, a 74-year-old walnut farmer and processor in his con- gressional district who has traveled to China to help develop the market for his product there. Now, he says, Chinese tariffs have dried up demand for walnuts and led to a steep drop in the price he earns for his crop. He expects to lose at least a million dollars on the mas- sive vats of nuts that are sitting in his Modesto—area processing plant. “We’re looking at one of the saddest markets that we’ve seen in years,” said Casazza, a Republican whose family has been growing nuts here for four generations. “Even if they ended this thing tomorrow, the damage has been done.” Casazza has voted for Denham in the past, but he said he wouldn’t be supporting him this year, largely out of anger over the trade issue. “I think he’s Trump’s lap- dog,” Casazza said. Of course, the administration could resolve trade disputes in the next few weeks, helping to avoid impacts on the midterm election. Negotiations are ongo- ing, and Mexico and Canada said last week that they’re getting closer to a trade deal with the U.S. to renew the North American Free Trade Agreement. But farmers are getting desperate, and the longer the tariffs stretch on, opinion could turn against the president and Republican members of Congress, observers say — especially as farmers begin harvesting nuts and fruit and inking contracts to sell their crop over the next weeks and months. “As we start to see a fall in orders, whether that’s almonds, walnuts or dairy products, then the mood will swing very, very quickly,” predicted Jamie Johansson, the president of the California Farm Bureau Federation. Meanwhile, Democratic challengers in the Valley are hoping to turn the issue into an election-year line of attack, arguing that the incumbents haven’t done enough to help farmers or halt Trump’s trade war. “Our farmers and families don’t want a bailout — they want to enjoy free trade,” said TJ Cox, a businessman and Democrat running against Rep. David Valadao, R-Hanford, who owns two nut processing plants. “They should all be marching there up Pennsylvania Avenue demanding that the administration stop these tariffs.” Valadao, a dairy farmer, said in a statement that
    he’s met with Vice President Mike Pence and Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue to share his constituents’ concerns. “We must ensure these funds are equitably distrib-
    uted to specialty crop farmers and we must recognize this is not a long-term solu-
    tion,” he wrote. Denham, Valadao and a half-dozen other California members of Congress who represent agricultural areas also wrote a letter to Perdue last week asking for a bigger chunk of the aid. The retaliatory tariffs are “threatening the eco-
    nomic livelihood of our businesses and communities,” the members wrote, adding that growers of specialty crops such as citrus and nuts should “receive a share of the $12 billion mitigation funding that is adequately proportional to the damage they will face.”
    That’s not enough, said Denham’s Democratic challenger finvestor Josh Harder.
    “The Trump administration is playing with fire, and farmers are paying the price,” he said. “A weakly worded letter isn’t going to cut it.” Central Valley farmers who worked long and hard to cultivate their Asian markets are frustrated to see them possibly slip away. The largest worry, experts say, is that tariffs could force importers in China and else-where to switch to products from Australia, New Zealand or other countries.
    Then, even if the trade war gets defused, they might find it easier to stick with their new sources instead of switching back to the Valley. Tom Nassif, the president of the Western Growers Association and one of Trump’s agricultural advisers during the 2016 campaign, said the administration needs to do more to help farmers.
    Trump’s trade policies “come at an extremely high cost for agriculture, and if this trade policy is going to continue, then we have to have more mitigation than what has been suggested,”
    Nassif said. While he said he supported the goals of the president’s policy, “we cannot be the victim in this.” “I don’t know of any trade dispute that has caused as much market disruption as this one has, by a long shot,” Nassif said.
    Thanks from MaryAnne

  2. #12
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    47,146
    Thanks
    29145

    From
    New Hampshire
    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    Element Electronics, a consumer electronics company in South Carolina, says it will be closing its plant in Winnsboro due to tariffs imposed by President Trump.

    The State reported Tuesday that the company was one of the largest remaining employers in Fairfield County after the local Walmart, which used to be the largest grocery store in the county, closed its doors two years ago.


    The news also comes after plans were canceled to build two nuclear reactors in the area, terminating 5,000 construction jobs.
    “When you think you’ve reached rock bottom, to get kicked in the gut like this, you didn’t think anything more could happen,” state Sen. Mike Fanning (D) said of Element's announcement to the local paper. “Within 365 days, you just get rocked to your core.”

    Element said “the layoff and closure is a result of the new tariffs that were recently and unexpectedly imposed on many goods imported from China, including the key television components used in our assembly operations in Winnsboro,” in a letter to the state’s Department of Employment and Workforce obtained by the local paper.

    http://thehill.com/policy/finance/40...-trump-tariffs

    But, but those "Carrier" jobs he saved.

    126 jobs - gone.

    Looks like poor Fairfield just keeps getting hit hard


    Element’s announcement also comes a year after Fairfield County’s last textile mill closed, eliminating 200 more jobs.

    https://www.thestate.com/news/politi...216196580.html
    It says they will only be closed for 3-6 months? Whats up with that?

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/08/07/chin...-tv-plant.html

  3. #13
    Established Member
    Joined
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    5,385
    Thanks
    1463

    From
    The cloud
    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    Element Electronics, a consumer electronics company in South Carolina, says it will be closing its plant in Winnsboro due to tariffs imposed by President Trump.

    The State reported Tuesday that the company was one of the largest remaining employers in Fairfield County after the local Walmart, which used to be the largest grocery store in the county, closed its doors two years ago.


    The news also comes after plans were canceled to build two nuclear reactors in the area, terminating 5,000 construction jobs.
    “When you think you’ve reached rock bottom, to get kicked in the gut like this, you didn’t think anything more could happen,” state Sen. Mike Fanning (D) said of Element's announcement to the local paper. “Within 365 days, you just get rocked to your core.”

    Element said “the layoff and closure is a result of the new tariffs that were recently and unexpectedly imposed on many goods imported from China, including the key television components used in our assembly operations in Winnsboro,” in a letter to the state’s Department of Employment and Workforce obtained by the local paper.

    http://thehill.com/policy/finance/40...-trump-tariffs

    But, but those "Carrier" jobs he saved.

    126 jobs - gone.

    Looks like poor Fairfield just keeps getting hit hard


    Element’s announcement also comes a year after Fairfield County’s last textile mill closed, eliminating 200 more jobs.

    https://www.thestate.com/news/politi...216196580.html
    I wouldn't expect an intellectually lazy and dishonest person to actually research the story. It was just too easy for you to allow it to fit your narative without doing your homework.

    Same story...different day for the left.


    The left-leaning Columbia, South Carolina State newspaper is currently engaged in some serious fearmongering/ handwringing in response to a recent announcement by Minnesota-based Element Electronics.

    According to the crony capitalist television manufacturer – which opened a television manufacturing facility in Winnsboro, S.C. five years ago – it is closing its Palmetto State plant in response to recent tariffs imposed by U.S. president Donald Trump.

    All told, 126 full-time jobs will be lost … which will further compound South Carolina’s atrocious employment situation. It will also do particular damage in Fairfield County, which was ground zero for the #NukeGate debacle that cost the state roughly 5,600 jobs last July.

    Terrible news? Absolutely … and we feel bad for state senator Mike Fanning, who told reporter Avery Wilks of The State that Element’s announcement was another “kick in the gut” for his district.

    It is, of that there is no doubt …

    Unfortunately, there is much more to this story than Trump tariffs …

    Longtime readers of this new site will recall that Element Electronics never intended to locate its facility in Fairfield County, and that its decision to do so was part of crony capitalist negotiations with former governor Nikki Haley.

    What happened? In the thick of what many expected to be a fierce fight for reelection, Haley desperately wanted to claim that she had created jobs in all forty-six South Carolina counties.

    Originally, Element wanted to locate its facility in Sumter County – but Haley reportedly talked company executives into building the plant in Fairfield County instead (the final county she needed to check off of her list). And yes, the deal was done just days before Haley kicked off her 2014 reelection campaign (which included the “jobs in all forty-six counties” spiel).

    Geography aside, there is a lot more to this story …

    First, Element pledged during its announcement to bring 500 jobs to Fairfield County (250 of them within the first year of operations), but that clearly didn’t happen. As usual, taxpayer-funded “economic developers” overpromised and underdelivered.

    Also, as reporter Rick Brundrett of The Nerve reported several months later, the total amount of taxpayer-funded incentives awarded to this company wound up being more than twice its capital investment.

    Element stood to make $14.8 million in government subsidies as part of its deal – well above the $7.5 million it claimed to have invested in South Carolina. In addition to this money, the company received a property tax break that wound up shifting the tax burden even further onto local residents and existing businesses.

    https://www.fitsnews.com/2018/08/07/...pitalist-fail/
    Thanks from THOR

  4. #14
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    39,976
    Thanks
    38384

    From
    United States
    It's long been typical of Republicans to offer ridiculous tax incentives to companies for locating a manufacturing facility in their states. The only thing the state gets in return is the taxes levied on the employees -- who don't get a tax incentive.

    In GOP parlance, such behavior is described as "creating a business friendly environment", just like passing laws to eliminate labor unions and environmental regulations.
    Thanks from BigLeRoy, labrea, Panzareta and 1 others

  5. #15
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    47,146
    Thanks
    29145

    From
    New Hampshire
    Quote Originally Posted by NightSwimmer View Post
    It's long been typical of Republicans to offer ridiculous tax incentives to companies for locating a manufacturing facility in their states. The only thing the state gets in return is the taxes levied on the employees -- who don't get a tax incentive.

    In GOP parlance, such behavior is described as "creating a business friendly environment", just like passing laws to eliminate labor unions and environmental regulations.
    If I recall correctly, Nikki Haley promised this company the moon to get them there.

  6. #16
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    39,976
    Thanks
    38384

    From
    United States
    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    If I recall correctly, Nikki Haley promised this company the moon to get them there.

    Well, she's moved on to greener pastures now, so I doubt that she's losing any sleep over the Trump tariffs leading to the closing of this facility.
    Thanks from EnigmaO01

  7. #17
    Veteran Member
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    32,226
    Thanks
    418

    From
    Tennessee
    Quote Originally Posted by NightSwimmer View Post
    Element Electronics wasn't a "small business". They manufactured televisions.
    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    They employed the most people after their Wal Mart shut down. If a Wal Mart shuts down, that goes to show you that poor town in really dying out.

    Yes they are considered a small business.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/steveco.../#163bac02360a

    Consumer rating of their products isn't good.

    https://www.consumeraffairs.com/home...cs.html?page=2

    I smell a rat!!

  8. #18
    Cat-tastic Babba's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    69,114
    Thanks
    51329

    From
    So. Md.
    Quote Originally Posted by DebateDrone View Post
    What's just as sad is if you ask Trump supporters that lost their jobs, many would still vote for Trump.
    Yeah, they think it's all part of Trump's long term plan and ultimately it'll all work out better. They're so delusional. What's happening is the rest of the world is working out deals with each other in order to work around us.
    Thanks from labrea and EnigmaO01

  9. #19
    Bad Policy Good Politics DebateDrone's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    37,841
    Thanks
    32945

    From
    Border Fence
    US added 157,000 jobs in July. That is modest. Losing jobs is not a good thing.

    Tariffs are just kicking in and we see with the layoffs and closures that people are going to be suffering uncalled for. Nov is 3 more months of closures and layoffs.


    Wages only rose a paltry 2.4%. Losing good paying jobs hurts even more. These are not McDonald's or Starbucks workers losing their jobs.
    Last edited by DebateDrone; 8th August 2018 at 07:26 AM.

  10. #20
    Nuisance Factor Yeti 8 Jungle Swing Champion, YetiSports 4 - Albatross Overload Champion, YetiSports7 - Snowboard FreeRide Champion, Alu`s Revenge Champion boontito's Avatar
    Joined
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    96,487
    Thanks
    74908

    From
    <-- "Meme Boy"
    Quote Originally Posted by Conservatarian View Post
    I wouldn't expect an intellectually lazy and dishonest person to actually research the story. It was just too easy for you to allow it to fit your narative without doing your homework.

    Same story...different day for the left.


    The left-leaning Columbia, South Carolina State newspaper is currently engaged in some serious fearmongering/ handwringing in response to a recent announcement by Minnesota-based Element Electronics.

    According to the crony capitalist television manufacturer – which opened a television manufacturing facility in Winnsboro, S.C. five years ago – it is closing its Palmetto State plant in response to recent tariffs imposed by U.S. president Donald Trump.

    All told, 126 full-time jobs will be lost … which will further compound South Carolina’s atrocious employment situation. It will also do particular damage in Fairfield County, which was ground zero for the #NukeGate debacle that cost the state roughly 5,600 jobs last July.

    Terrible news? Absolutely … and we feel bad for state senator Mike Fanning, who told reporter Avery Wilks of The State that Element’s announcement was another “kick in the gut” for his district.

    It is, of that there is no doubt …

    Unfortunately, there is much more to this story than Trump tariffs …

    Longtime readers of this new site will recall that Element Electronics never intended to locate its facility in Fairfield County, and that its decision to do so was part of crony capitalist negotiations with former governor Nikki Haley.

    What happened? In the thick of what many expected to be a fierce fight for reelection, Haley desperately wanted to claim that she had created jobs in all forty-six South Carolina counties.

    Originally, Element wanted to locate its facility in Sumter County – but Haley reportedly talked company executives into building the plant in Fairfield County instead (the final county she needed to check off of her list). And yes, the deal was done just days before Haley kicked off her 2014 reelection campaign (which included the “jobs in all forty-six counties” spiel).

    Geography aside, there is a lot more to this story …

    First, Element pledged during its announcement to bring 500 jobs to Fairfield County (250 of them within the first year of operations), but that clearly didn’t happen. As usual, taxpayer-funded “economic developers” overpromised and underdelivered.

    Also, as reporter Rick Brundrett of The Nerve reported several months later, the total amount of taxpayer-funded incentives awarded to this company wound up being more than twice its capital investment.

    Element stood to make $14.8 million in government subsidies as part of its deal – well above the $7.5 million it claimed to have invested in South Carolina. In addition to this money, the company received a property tax break that wound up shifting the tax burden even further onto local residents and existing businesses.

    https://www.fitsnews.com/2018/08/07/...pitalist-fail/
    Just more corporate welfare. When it's received by a low income individual in need, it's because theyre a lazy person who is just out for freebies and stealing money from honest taxpayers. When it's received by a company, it's "economic development".

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The first layoffs from Trump’s tariffs are here
    By Friday13 in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 29th June 2018, 11:34 AM
  2. President Trump's Tariffs
    By Supposn in forum Economics
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 3rd June 2018, 01:14 PM
  3. Trump’s Tariffs Hit Home in the U.S.
    By Friday13 in forum Economics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11th April 2018, 12:44 AM
  4. Think twice about tariffs, President Trump.
    By HadEnough2 in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 131
    Last Post: 24th March 2018, 06:09 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 18th November 2016, 03:58 AM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed