Members banned from this thread: Pragmatist


Page 5 of 19 FirstFirst ... 3456715 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 185
Thanks Tree51Thanks

Thread: minimum wages

  1. #41
    New Member
    Joined
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    845
    Thanks
    212

    From
    Florida
    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatist View Post
    Yeah, fuck the little guy. After all, he has no say in the matter. Your last sentence better reads... Americans are free to work for whatever wage the employer tells him he is going to work for or he won't have a job. I seriously doubt those making the minimum "agree" that is what they should be paid.
    Have you ever actually had a job if you think that's how it works? Bernie, is that you?
    Thanks from FuzzGod

  2. #42
    Veteran Member
    Joined
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    13,227
    Thanks
    3544

    From
    AK
    Quote Originally Posted by Dittohead not! View Post
    The minimum wage in Australia is one of the highest in the world at $17.70 per hour.
    The exchange rate is $1,000 US to 1,36.60 AUD.

    That is the equivalent of $12.96 in US dollars.

    With me so far?

    So, the price of fast food in Australia must be a lot higher than it is in the USA, right?

    Cost of a big mack in Australia: $4.95. Cost of a big mack in the USA: $3.99. Cheaper, right? Oh, wait, that exchange rate again: $3.99 x 1.3660 = $5.45 in Australian dollars.

    So, using the official exchange rate, a big mack costs 45 cents more in the USA, where the minim wage is $7.25, than it does in Australia, where the minimum wage, in US dollars, is $12.96 per hour.

    OK, those are the facts. What is your opinion?
    My opinions are as follows:

    1) I don't know why fast food and Big Macs are used as the basis for determining the effect of minimum wages. Why not, oh, I dunno, cigarettes and porn magazines? Why does McDonalds, of all companies, deserve this free advertising in economic debates?

    2) It could be and probably is the case that the effects of high minimum wages are going to be different in booming economies than in stagnant or recessionary ones.

    3) One-size-fits-all economic policies do not affect thriving urban areas the same way they affect depressed rural areas, so why should they be imposed on local areas where the effects are not as helpful? Or is there some evidence that the effect is similarly benign or positive in poorer rural areas as it is in thriving urban areas? If so, please offer said evidence.

  3. #43
    Moderator HayJenn's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    30,039
    Thanks
    23964

    From
    CA
    Thread Ban Notice

    Pragmatist has been banned from this thread. Please do not respond to posts


  4. #44
    Master political analyst Dittohead not!'s Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    9,446
    Thanks
    3951

    From
    The formerly great golden state
    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Dad View Post
    Let's compare the price of a house in Australia to the USA then we'll talk about the minimum wage. Does that make sense?


    Sent from my iPad Pro using Tapatalk
    Only if houses in both countries are being built by minimum wage workers.

    The cost of houses depends, like most things, on supply and demand.


    Buy a house in, say, Fresno California, and you'll pay a lot less than the same one in Palo Alto, for example, and it's based on supply and demand, not on the minimum wage in those two towns.

    It's called "capitalism." It works.

  5. #45
    Master political analyst Dittohead not!'s Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    9,446
    Thanks
    3951

    From
    The formerly great golden state
    Quote Originally Posted by Otto Throttle View Post
    Payroll taxes aren't taxes. Social security is theoretically your own money which you will, theoretically, get back in social security payments, except that the government has been robbing the SS funds. Medicare is more like old age health insurance on which you start paying the premiums early. Neither is a traditional tax, which is why above a certain threshold income isn't subject to medicare or social security "tax", quite the opposite of the progressive income tax. So poor workers don't "pay payroll tax", they invest in their own future. Yeah, that's it. And then they get the earned income tax credit, which is a welfare payment to low earners, so they may actually come out ahead. So actually, not only can tax rate reach zero, you could get a refund back that was never paid in.

    Payroll taxes aren't taxes, as the payer expects something back.

    Interesting concept.

    So, school taxes aren't taxes if you have or may one day have school age children.
    Gasoline taxes aren't taxes, as you get to drive on the highways.

    Somehow, I'd never thought of it that way.
    Thanks from NeoVsMatrix

  6. #46
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    36,058
    Thanks
    21387

    From
    New Hampshire
    While I am not against minimum wage increases, I do think we have to realize a few other things. First, if one has ever traveled abroad, most fast food workers elsewhere are "kids" not older adults. Other countries have vast training programs so older adults aren't relegated to work fast food. They are re-trained for other jobs at higher pay. Here we don't have that. If you are in your 40s and lose your job, its possible you could end up working fast food if you don't have marketable skills. So that makes a huge issue. Secondly, many retail/fast food jobs are becoming more and more automated. So the numbers of available jobs in these sectors is going to go down. All our local fast food chains have kiosks now for ordering and have gotten rid of at least 50% of their old headcounts. I think it just might be more beneficial in the long run to spend the money on training programs so adults with families have better opportunities to make a living. Leave fast food/retail to the under 25s where it belongs.
    Thanks from Southern Dad

  7. #47
    Veteran Member Southern Dad's Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    26,209
    Thanks
    5779

    From
    Walking the Fine Line
    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    While I am not against minimum wage increases, I do think we have to realize a few other things. First, if one has ever traveled abroad, most fast food workers elsewhere are "kids" not older adults. Other countries have vast training programs so older adults aren't relegated to work fast food. They are re-trained for other jobs at higher pay. Here we don't have that. If you are in your 40s and lose your job, its possible you could end up working fast food if you don't have marketable skills. So that makes a huge issue. Secondly, many retail/fast food jobs are becoming more and more automated. So the numbers of available jobs in these sectors is going to go down. All our local fast food chains have kiosks now for ordering and have gotten rid of at least 50% of their old headcounts. I think it just might be more beneficial in the long run to spend the money on training programs so adults with families have better opportunities to make a living. Leave fast food/retail to the under 25s where it belongs.
    In other countries, people in their 40's generally are not losing their jobs. It happens but it is a rarity. Their manufacturing isn't leaving the country. People in many countries work for the same company their entire life.
    Thanks from bajisima

  8. #48
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    36,058
    Thanks
    21387

    From
    New Hampshire
    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Dad View Post
    In other countries, people in their 40's generally are not losing their jobs. It happens but it is a rarity. Their manufacturing isn't leaving the country. People in many countries work for the same company their entire life.
    That's true for the most part as well. But I am also referring to things like disability and illness. One of our neighbors was in his early 30s when he really messed up his back and could no longer do his manual job. He became suicidal since he felt he no longer had any purpose in life and didn't want to sit home all day collecting disability. He worked retail a bit but has had hours cut and got laid off since online shopping has hurt the industry. He had friends up in Canada who had similar circumstances, and instead of a disability check, they sent him in for retraining and he now has a nice desk job and is contributing back to society. We have no such programs.

  9. #49
    Veteran Member Southern Dad's Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    26,209
    Thanks
    5779

    From
    Walking the Fine Line
    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    That's true for the most part as well. But I am also referring to things like disability and illness. One of our neighbors was in his early 30s when he really messed up his back and could no longer do his manual job. He became suicidal since he felt he no longer had any purpose in life and didn't want to sit home all day collecting disability. He worked retail a bit but has had hours cut and got laid off since online shopping has hurt the industry. He had friends up in Canada who had similar circumstances, and instead of a disability check, they sent him in for retraining and he now has a nice desk job and is contributing back to society. We have no such programs.
    That is not true. We have many of those programs but you have to have something called motivation. I have a service connected disability rated at 100%. After retiring from the military, I could have sat around at home playing the disabled veteran card but I didn't. I went into a new career. There are programs out there. If someone needs to go back to school, we have student loan programs that just about anyone qualifies to get. Of course, that does take work. You do have to maintain a grade average.

  10. #50
    New Member
    Joined
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    845
    Thanks
    212

    From
    Florida
    Quote Originally Posted by Dittohead not! View Post
    Payroll taxes aren't taxes, as the payer expects something back.

    Interesting concept.

    So, school taxes aren't taxes if you have or may one day have school age children.
    Gasoline taxes aren't taxes, as you get to drive on the highways.

    Somehow, I'd never thought of it that way.
    I'd agree that gasoline taxes could be thought of as user fees, but tax funded education of our children benefits all members of a community so that is a legitimate reason for raising tax money.
    Actually though Social Security was originally the "federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program", and my social security card says on it "social security account number", as if my money was being put away for my later use. Obviously things have morphed a bit.

Page 5 of 19 FirstFirst ... 3456715 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 70
    Last Post: 7th February 2016, 01:17 PM
  2. Wages Rise
    By MaryAnne in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 5th February 2016, 10:11 AM
  3. Replies: 45
    Last Post: 14th November 2015, 12:22 PM
  4. As minimum wages rise, restaurants say no to tipping
    By bajisima in forum Current Events
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: 25th August 2015, 03:51 PM
  5. Public sctor wages vs. private sector wages
    By Blueneck in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 21st April 2011, 01:24 PM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed