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Thread: In a world without work, being busy will be a status symbol

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    I will look for that research later but I can already tell it's a very biased point of view.

    This fear has occurred during every industrial uptick we have ever had and it's always unfounded.

    A technological leap will erase many jobs but it also ends up creating whole new industries also. The time between is on average about 20 years or shorter.

    Everything from communication to transportation to the use of the computer has decimated certain industries but created even larger ones in their place. Electricity put a huge percentage of populations out of a job but ultimately created far more. Yes it sucke if you as a worker get caught in one of these in esteem times but that's just bad luck.
    The vast majority of jobs that are under threat from automation existed in some form 200 years ago, but we've just slowly needed fewer people to do them. Within 20 years, we will surpass Great Depression levels of unemployment if nothing is done.

    ...Or if our cultural attitude towards work doesn't change.
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  2. #12
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    I fear that the previous ability to adjust for areas of employment being removed by technology was fuelled by growth, through the exploitation of more natural resources and availing ourselves of more land.

    The land it pretty well used up now and the resources are becoming more and more expensive to exploit. I fear we need a new paradigm for economic health not dependent on constant GDP growth. But I have no idea what that might be.

    I do think we are reaching a point where AI/robotics are going to do exactly what the OP says. In the 60s, a small refinery in the city where I lived employed 50 people. By the 1990s that same refinery could produce more product with only 5 employees.

    Trump and his coal jobs - ha. Even if we increase the coal we burn, and I sincerely hope not, just more coal mining machines will be bought rather than bunches of workers rehired.

    Any of you seen a modern car manufacturing facility? Lots of machines, few workers.

    So waiters and store clerks-R-US.
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  3. #13
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    Ben Sasse wrote an interesting op-ed about this last week: https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-cha...era-1492800857
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    Just thinking in the next couple decades, will teens even learn to drive? Will there be a need to? Or will they just get in a driverless car?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Just thinking in the next couple decades, will teens even learn to drive? Will there be a need to? Or will they just get in a driverless car?
    Exactly. Think of us as kids in the 60s. Say you wanted to research a paper for school. First, someone had to teach you how to use the Dewey Decimal system every library used to keep track of books, titles and topics. That file was on index cards that someone meticulously typed. Then someone sorted them and put them in the big filing cabinet at every library. That cabinet was usually hand made by someone somewhere in the USA. Then, someone had to make sure the long lines of bookshelves were in order, label them and put all those books on all those shelves in just the right order. Returned books were on rolling trays to be manually returned in the right place just so we could look up the book and find it to get information on why the Civil War started. Now, a kid uses his phone that was mainly made by robots to access data on the cloud that could have been put there by anyone in the world.

    The old system employed people all down the line. The new one not so many. Just keep doing this for everything you can think of and you will see just how many jobs have been lost forever.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Just thinking in the next couple decades, will teens even learn to drive? Will there be a need to? Or will they just get in a driverless car?
    Can only speak anecdotally, but my 15 year old thinks driverless cars are ridiculous and is very much looking forward to driving.
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    I was excited when I first started driving, but that changed quickly. I'm almost 28, and drive daily, but I kinda hate doing it. It's stressful, and if an AI program could drive for me, I'd be ecstatic. Moreso if I didn't have to own a car and not have to worry about insurance.

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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDozer View Post
    I was excited when I first started driving, but that changed quickly. I'm almost 28, and drive daily, but I kinda hate doing it. It's stressful, and if an AI program could drive for me, I'd be ecstatic. Moreso if I didn't have to own a car and not have to worry about insurance.
    When I was a kid, driving meant freedom. When I got out of college, I couldn't find work in my area and was able to drive to another state and find work. I don't know how people will move around anymore. Or maybe they wont. People will live and die in the same general area.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    When I was a kid, driving meant freedom. When I got out of college, I couldn't find work in my area and was able to drive to another state and find work. I don't know how people will move around anymore. Or maybe they wont. People will live and die in the same general area.
    As part of the whole north american culture, especially in the west, mobility is both a way of life and a necessity.

    When we lived in London for a year, even in 1973, (that hurts) we bought a car in spite of the fact that the car plus insurance was big money on the measly fellowship I was on. But everyone knows you need a car, right. Well, in fact wrong. It was a waste. The public transit, even to go see Oxford and Cambridge was such that the car ended up being more of a hindrance than a help.

    And as our population densities increase, that will become the norm more and more here, well except for Southern California.

    And that is another thing that gives me pause when you look at how important the car industry is to N. America in particular.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    When I was a kid, driving meant freedom. When I got out of college, I couldn't find work in my area and was able to drive to another state and find work. I don't know how people will move around anymore. Or maybe they wont. People will live and die in the same general area.
    Not likely. Self-driving cars represent greater freedom. Now, you don't have to stay focused on the road when going somewhere. All that mental and physical fatigue will be a thing of the past. Other forms of mass transit will allow us to go places faster, like hyperloop, improved VTOL craft, and general HSR.

    I know I'd probably leave the house more often if it meant I didn't have to be the one doing the driving all the time.

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