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Thread: In a world without work, being busy will be a status symbol

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by RNG View Post
    As part of the whole north american culture, especially in the west, mobility is both a way of life and a necessity.

    When we lived in London for a year, even in 1973, (that hurts) we bought a car in spite of the fact that the car plus insurance was big money on the measly fellowship I was on. But everyone knows you need a car, right. Well, in fact wrong. It was a waste. The public transit, even to go see Oxford and Cambridge was such that the car ended up being more of a hindrance than a help.

    And as our population densities increase, that will become the norm more and more here, well except for Southern California.

    And that is another thing that gives me pause when you look at how important the car industry is to N. America in particular.
    The Absurd Primacy of the Automobile in American Life
    https://www.theatlantic.com/business...n-life/476346/

    This was a good one.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDozer View Post
    Not likely. Self-driving cars represent greater freedom. Now, you don't have to stay focused on the road when going somewhere. All that mental and physical fatigue will be a thing of the past. Other forms of mass transit will allow us to go places faster, like hyperloop, improved VTOL craft, and general HSR.

    I know I'd probably leave the house more often if it meant I didn't have to be the one doing the driving all the time.
    Me too but ...

    I predict an increase in adult themed go-kart type facilities when that happens. I do enjoy getting a bit rammy on a winding mountain road and I know I'm not alone in that. But just once in a while at my choosing. And that is so much different than stress inducing city driving or boredom inducing freeway driving.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDozer View Post
    Not likely. Self-driving cars represent greater freedom. Now, you don't have to stay focused on the road when going somewhere. All that mental and physical fatigue will be a thing of the past. Other forms of mass transit will allow us to go places faster, like hyperloop, improved VTOL craft, and general HSR.

    I know I'd probably leave the house more often if it meant I didn't have to be the one doing the driving all the time.
    But we aren't moving more. Far less in fact. Millenials are called "generation stuck."

    https://www.theatlantic.com/business...nymore/254349/

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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    But we aren't moving more. Far less in fact. Millenials are called "generation stuck."

    https://www.theatlantic.com/business...nymore/254349/
    I'd wager that's because of money. No pun intended.

    I don't live in Houston proper, but outside the beltway in a suburb. I'd prefer to live close to downtown, but it's so prohibitively expensive to afford anything but a studio apartment on less than $1000 a month. And Houston is one of the cheapest major cities in which to live! Jobs just don't pay as much anymore, while living costs are rising, and it's hard to get in the door when everyone wants 5 years of experience for entry level.

    And I'd move to another city for work, if I knew I had a good shot at finding work that would pay enough to support me, but relocating is even more expensive nowadays.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDozer View Post
    I'd wager that's because of money. No pun intended.

    I don't live in Houston proper, but outside the beltway in a suburb. I'd prefer to live close to downtown, but it's so prohibitively expensive to afford anything but a studio apartment on less than $1000 a month. And Houston is one of the cheapest major cities in which to live! Jobs just don't pay as much anymore, while living costs are rising, and it's hard to get in the door when everyone wants 5 years of experience for entry level.

    And I'd move to another city for work, if I knew I had a good shot at finding work that would pay enough to support me, but relocating is even more expensive nowadays.
    I don't necessarily seeing that changing anytime soon. Younger people are remaining where they are due to money. That makes it problematic if we ever see some massive outsourcing or automation. With no money, this could create new poverty zones like we see in the rust belt areas today.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Totally agree. We always hear the old argument that the car didn't displace the blacksmith, he just learned a new skill. But as you say, that was a material skill for another material skill. Now we are looking at material (human) skills being traded in for a machine, robot or computer. As my boss told us all once, "I would get rid of all of you for robots in a heartbeat if I could."
    well, maybe we should all become artists to make a living. that function hasn't been replaced - yet (I'm sure they are working on it).

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    Quote Originally Posted by bonehead View Post
    well, maybe we should all become artists to make a living. that function hasn't been replaced - yet (I'm sure they are working on it).
    They're still experimental, but there are AI programs that study things like music theory, and are able to put together pretty good compositions.

    Like the AI by the name of Emily Howell


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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDozer View Post
    They're still experimental, but there are AI programs that study things like music theory, and are able to put together pretty good compositions.

    Like the AI by the name of Emily Howell

    ah,yes. but, to the trained ear, there is still a difference between AI and a highly accomplished (and talented) musician. I'm sure this same condition exists in painters and sculptors.

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