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Thread: Walmart is asking employees to deliver packages on their way home from work

  1. #1
    Veteran Member Southern Dad's Avatar
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    Walmart is asking employees to deliver packages on their way home from work

    If your employer asked you to deliver something on the way home from work, would you? I'm in the newspaper industry. I came up the circulation side of the house. This was something that was just done. I can't count the number of times I redelivered someone's paper on the way home or dropped more papers at a store.

    Walmart is testing this at three stores, two in New Jersey and one in Arkansas. Could this make service a priority again? When I was a kid we got deliveries from several companies every week to our door. We got milk delivered from Borden Dairy. We had chips and snacks delivered by a company called Charles Chips. Then there was Red Baron Pizza and ice cream from Schwan Food.

    Is to the porch or door delivery a positive step for retailers?

    Walmart is asking employees to deliver packages on their way home from work

    Walmart’s newest tactic in its fight against online giant Amazon: enlisting its employees to deliver online orders on their way home from work.

    The idea, Walmart executives said Thursday, is to cut costs on the so-called last-mile of deliveries, when packages are driven to customers’ homes, often the most expensive part of the fulfillment process.

    Bhattarai, A. (2017, June 01). Walmart is asking employees to deliver packages on their way home from work. Retrieved June 02, 2017, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.f87559d95194

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    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    I think so.

    There are tons of grocery stores that will now deliver to your door, McDonald's I hear is starting this up also so if fast food gets involved it will be huge.

    However one could argue that we've already taken this step back with all the internet sales that come straight to you.

    Its also extra pay for the employees so I am glad to see Walmart taking the lead on this.

    Its like earning pay for driving home.

    Hell you were heading that way anyways. I can see employees taking the long route to the delivery though lol.

    I would.

    An extra hour of pay adds up.

  3. #3
    Veteran Member Southern Dad's Avatar
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    It's not just an extra hour of pay but they get paid mileage, too. We still have Carmichaels local drug store here in Monroe that delivers. That delivery has allowed it to compete and stay in business when competing with CVS, Walgreens, Rite Aid, and Walmart Pharmacy. All of which are in the city.

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    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Dad View Post
    If your employer asked you to deliver something on the way home from work, would you? I'm in the newspaper industry. I came up the circulation side of the house. This was something that was just done. I can't count the number of times I redelivered someone's paper on the way home or dropped more papers at a store.

    Walmart is testing this at three stores, two in New Jersey and one in Arkansas. Could this make service a priority again? When I was a kid we got deliveries from several companies every week to our door. We got milk delivered from Borden Dairy. We had chips and snacks delivered by a company called Charles Chips. Then there was Red Baron Pizza and ice cream from Schwan Food.

    Is to the porch or door delivery a positive step for retailers?
    Well, it's not exploitive.

    Employees will be paid extra for the voluntary program, and offered overtime pay as necessary to make the deliveries, Walmart spokesman Ravi Jariwala said Thursday.
    And, the biggest expense in delivery to home is the liability, vehicle, insurance, etc. Using the employee's vehicle, insurance and so forth does represent an efficiency.

    But this is still a bailing out a sinking canoe with a teaspoon, so to speak.

    Amazon Fresh has no bricks and mortar retail stores costs AT ALL. They are entering markets like California with a Ghengis Khan approach. Local groceries will be offered the chance to sell to Amazon -- at Amazon prices and to Amazon standards -- and the delivery services are Amazon's own, or those of their subcontractor.

    Say Amazon Fresh comes to Cleveland. Two chain groceries here already offer "pick up at the store", and one is Walmarts. So if Walmarts is losing foottraffick and market share already, what will happen after Amazon offers to deliver those groceries to my door -- for an additional $50/year over what Amazon Prime charges me already?

    I am already using order online and pick up at store. It is ALWAYS the case that the $10 fee Giant Eagle imposes is offset -- and my total bill is lowered -- because I can shop at leisure, use ecoupons, etc.

    Some economists think I will not pay $50 more a month/year/whatever to avoid having to get in the car and burn up gas to fetch my groceries.

    They are WRONG. Gas is expensive; I have still got nightmares about trying to grocery shop with a crying baby, and now that I am retired, the retail groceries are even less appealing. Enormous, poorly laid out (from my POV), exhausting to shop at.

    Walmarts is screwed because no way can it compete with Amazon's lower cost, it also cannot close all its retail stores while hanging on to the market share it has now. Once a former face to face customer goes online to buy, they have very little loyalty. Google Shopping search is set up for me to check out where an item might be most cheaply both.

    Today, it is still Walmarts, in some cases, but that's because of their import of Chinese slave made goods. Amazon's are lower because of its monopoly power, forcing its supply chain sellers to agree to a cheaper price of face being excluded from Amazon's customers.

    So....Amazon Fresh will have the better product, and deliver it to the customer's door.

    And do it at a cheaper price!
    Last edited by Madeline; 2nd June 2017 at 03:21 AM.

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    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    Well if this works I doubt it will be employees making deliveries just on their way home, they will create an entire department for deliveries.

    That means more jobs.

    I don't have figures but if every Walmart starts doing this its probably going to be in the tens of thousands.

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    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    Well, it's not exploitive.



    And, the biggest expense in delivery to home is the liability, vehicle, insurance, etc. Using the employee's vehicle, insurance and so forth does represent an efficiency.

    But this is still a bailing out a sinking canoe with a teaspoon, so to speak.

    Amazon Fresh (as opposed to Prime) has no bricks and mortar retail stores costs AT ALL. They are entering markets like California with a Ghengis Khan approach. Local groceries will be offered the chance to sell to Amazon -- at Amazon prices and to Amazon standards -- and the delivery services are Amon's own, or a subcontractor of theirs.

    Say Amazon Fresh comes to Cleveland. Two chain groceries here already offer "pick up at the store", and one is Walmarts. So if Walmarts is losing footraffick and market share already, what will happen after Amazon offers to deliver those groceries to my door -- for an additional $50/year over what Amazon Prime charges me already?

    I am already using order online and pick up at store. It is ALWAYS the case that the $10 fee Giant Eagle imposes is offset -- and my total bill is lowered -- because I can shop at leisure, use ecoupons, etc.

    Some economists think I will not pay $50 more a month to avoid having to get in the car and burn up gas to fetch my groceries.

    They are WRONG. Gas is expensive; I have still got nightmares about trying to grocery shop with a crying baby, and now that I am retired, the retail groceries are even less appealing. Enormous, poorly laid out (from my POV), exhausting to shop at.

    Walmarts is screwed because no way can it compete with Amazon's lower cost, it also cannot close all its retail stores while hanging on to the market share it has. Once a former face to face customer goes online to buy, they have very little loyalty. Google Shopping search is set up for me to check out where an item might be most cheaply both.

    Today, it is still Walmarts, in some cases, but that's because of their import of Chinese slave made goods. Amazon's are lower because of its monopoly power, forcing its supply chain sellers to agree to a cheaper price of face being excluded from Amazon's customers.

    So....Amazon Fresh will have the better product, and deliver it to the customer's door.
    You are forgetting the profit that those brick and mortar stores bring in however.

    This would allow Walmart to offer goods at a lower price over amazon.

    I think it is Amazon who should be worried here.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    Well if this works I doubt it will be employees making deliveries just on their way home, they will create an entire department for deliveries.

    That means more jobs.

    I don't have figures but if every Walmart starts doing this its probably going to be in the tens of thousands.
    Only in the short run.

    Walmarts creates MILLIONS of jobs, in the company and in its supporting economy. Closing all the Walmarts will displace ALMOST all those workers -- who will have no other job opportunities in retail.

    Closing all the Walmarts would be akin to closing a military base in the US; usually turns the surrounding city into a ghost town.

  8. #8
    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    Only in the short run.

    Walmarts creates MILLIONS of jobs, in the company and in its supporting economy. Closing all the Walmarts will displace ALMOST all those workers -- who will have no other job opportunities in retail.
    Walmarts aren't going to be closing.

    I don't have numbers but I imagine the majority of shoppers still use actual stores and that's not going to change anytime soon. If you need to buy something on the way home from work for dinner you aren't going to go home and order it, you are going to stop at a store.

  9. #9
    Cat-tastic Babba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    Walmarts aren't going to be closing.

    I don't have numbers but I imagine the majority of shoppers still use actual stores and that's not going to change anytime soon. If you need to buy something on the way home from work for dinner you aren't going to go home and order it, you are going to stop at a store.
    Just as with renewable and green energy, right now we're still dependent on bricks and mortar stores, but the future is in online shopping, just as green energy is. Add to that the fact that millennials are a driving force behind the rising online shopping numbers.

    Millennials are driving the shift. The 18-34 age group is now making 54% of its purchases online, up from 51% last year and 5 points ahead of the 49% of online purchases made by non-Millennials.

    "The millennial impact is critical. It is the driving force behind a lot of the change in retail," says Neil Saunders, CEO of retail analysis firm Conlumino.

    "The issue is that millennial consumers are digital natives; they don’t view the world in terms of channels, they see smartphones, tablets, social media, stores and so forth as part of one big ecosystem. Retailers, by contrast, have typically thought in terms of channels, so they are having to integrate their thinking and systems and ways of doing business."
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/money...line/85592598/

    Bricks and mortar stores will always exist and oil will always be needed for some circumstances. And actually, Walmart did close a couple hundred stores last year and look at all the other retailers that have closed stores or ceased to exist altogether lately.

  10. #10
    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    Yes online shopping will increase but it will cap off at some point.

    Like I said, people need to run to the store all the time for stuff, they don't want to wait for things.

    And sorry but I am not going to order produce over the internet which is involved in pretty much every meal I make. I need to go to the store and pick the fresh items I need. So brick and mortar stores aren't going anywhere.

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