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Thread: $2 an hour employees making luxury SUVs

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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    $2 an hour employees making luxury SUVs

    Auto worker Ivan Flores spends his days transporting parts for U.S.-bound Audi SUVs at a plant in central Mexico, but he laughs when asked if he could ever buy one of the $40,000 Q5 SUVs the plant produces on his $2.25 per hour salary.

    "For us it is a dream to buy a Q5; we never could," said Flores, 40, who supports three sons on his roughly $110 weekly paycheck.

    But in Mexico where the auto industry has boomed under the North American Free Trade Agreement, with plants like the Audi factory that opened in Puebla state in 2016 the industry has created something different: a class of workers who are barely getting by, crammed into tiny 500-square-foot apartments in government-subsidized projects that they pay for over decades. Many can't afford even a used car, taking home as little as $50 per week after deductions for mortgages and cafeteria meals.

    Why have Mexican auto salaries stagnated or declined while pay for Chinese auto workers rose, despite all the promises that North American Free Trade Agreement would increase Mexican wages? That's the question U.S. negotiators are asking as the third round of NAFTA talks resumes in Ottawa, Canada.
    Ironically, U.S. President Donald Trump, widely seen here as one of Mexico's worst enemies, is pressing the issue of low Mexican wage rates, saying labor protections should be strengthened.

    Government records show that on Jan 24, 2014 almost three years before the Sept. 30, 2016, inauguration of the Audi plant the company signed a union contract that specified wages as low as $1.40 per hour, up to $4 per hour. Everybody knows what the conditions are when they apply. These are the wages, this is the union," said union chief Alvaro Lopez Vazquez. "You decide. If you don't like it, you can look elsewhere."


    In Mexico, $2 per hour workers make $40,000 SUVs - ABC News
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    Senior Member Loki's Avatar
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    The question is : what will the market bear ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Auto worker Ivan Flores spends his days transporting parts for U.S.-bound Audi SUVs at a plant in central Mexico, but he laughs when asked if he could ever buy one of the $40,000 Q5 SUVs the plant produces on his $2.25 per hour salary.

    "For us it is a dream to buy a Q5; we never could," said Flores, 40, who supports three sons on his roughly $110 weekly paycheck.

    But in Mexico — where the auto industry has boomed under the North American Free Trade Agreement, with plants like the Audi factory that opened in Puebla state in 2016 — the industry has created something different: a class of workers who are barely getting by, crammed into tiny 500-square-foot apartments in government-subsidized projects that they pay for over decades. Many can't afford even a used car, taking home as little as $50 per week after deductions for mortgages and cafeteria meals.

    Why have Mexican auto salaries stagnated or declined while pay for Chinese auto workers rose, despite all the promises that North American Free Trade Agreement would increase Mexican wages? That's the question U.S. negotiators are asking as the third round of NAFTA talks resumes in Ottawa, Canada.
    Ironically, U.S. President Donald Trump, widely seen here as one of Mexico's worst enemies, is pressing the issue of low Mexican wage rates, saying labor protections should be strengthened.

    Government records show that on Jan 24, 2014 — almost three years before the Sept. 30, 2016, inauguration of the Audi plant — the company signed a union contract that specified wages as low as $1.40 per hour, up to $4 per hour. Everybody knows what the conditions are when they apply. These are the wages, this is the union," said union chief Alvaro Lopez Vazquez. "You decide. If you don't like it, you can look elsewhere."


    In Mexico, $2 per hour workers make $40,000 SUVs - ABC News
    bajisima,

    Isn't this where some liberal chimes in and says that in Germany, labor unions are given a seat in the corporate board room and have a hand in deciding the direction of the company?

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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kallie Knoetze View Post
    bajisima,

    Isn't this where some liberal chimes in and says that in Germany, labor unions are given a seat in the corporate board room and have a hand in deciding the direction of the company?
    Germany has definitely changed in many ways. They now have several plants in Slovenia and Slovakia so they can pay less than half what they had been paying in Germany. They want to keep costs of vehicles down.
    Thanks from Madeline and NeoVsMatrix

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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Auto worker Ivan Flores spends his days transporting parts for U.S.-bound Audi SUVs at a plant in central Mexico, but he laughs when asked if he could ever buy one of the $40,000 Q5 SUVs the plant produces on his $2.25 per hour salary.

    "For us it is a dream to buy a Q5; we never could," said Flores, 40, who supports three sons on his roughly $110 weekly paycheck.

    But in Mexico — where the auto industry has boomed under the North American Free Trade Agreement, with plants like the Audi factory that opened in Puebla state in 2016 — the industry has created something different: a class of workers who are barely getting by, crammed into tiny 500-square-foot apartments in government-subsidized projects that they pay for over decades. Many can't afford even a used car, taking home as little as $50 per week after deductions for mortgages and cafeteria meals.

    Why have Mexican auto salaries stagnated or declined while pay for Chinese auto workers rose, despite all the promises that North American Free Trade Agreement would increase Mexican wages? That's the question U.S. negotiators are asking as the third round of NAFTA talks resumes in Ottawa, Canada.
    Ironically, U.S. President Donald Trump, widely seen here as one of Mexico's worst enemies, is pressing the issue of low Mexican wage rates, saying labor protections should be strengthened.

    Government records show that on Jan 24, 2014 — almost three years before the Sept. 30, 2016, inauguration of the Audi plant — the company signed a union contract that specified wages as low as $1.40 per hour, up to $4 per hour. Everybody knows what the conditions are when they apply. These are the wages, this is the union," said union chief Alvaro Lopez Vazquez. "You decide. If you don't like it, you can look elsewhere."


    In Mexico, $2 per hour workers make $40,000 SUVs - ABC News
    VW which obviously owns Audi has been in Puebla for decades. Perhaps they built a separate Audi only facility, but at one point I believe Puebla was the largest single auto plant in North America.
    Thanks from bajisima

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    Senior Member Loki's Avatar
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    If you want to see poverty, check out India or Sudan. They cry from the reality, you'll cry just visiting.

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    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Auto worker Ivan Flores spends his days transporting parts for U.S.-bound Audi SUVs at a plant in central Mexico, but he laughs when asked if he could ever buy one of the $40,000 Q5 SUVs the plant produces on his $2.25 per hour salary.

    "For us it is a dream to buy a Q5; we never could," said Flores, 40, who supports three sons on his roughly $110 weekly paycheck.

    But in Mexico — where the auto industry has boomed under the North American Free Trade Agreement, with plants like the Audi factory that opened in Puebla state in 2016 — the industry has created something different: a class of workers who are barely getting by, crammed into tiny 500-square-foot apartments in government-subsidized projects that they pay for over decades. Many can't afford even a used car, taking home as little as $50 per week after deductions for mortgages and cafeteria meals.

    Why have Mexican auto salaries stagnated or declined while pay for Chinese auto workers rose, despite all the promises that North American Free Trade Agreement would increase Mexican wages? That's the question U.S. negotiators are asking as the third round of NAFTA talks resumes in Ottawa, Canada.
    Ironically, U.S. President Donald Trump, widely seen here as one of Mexico's worst enemies, is pressing the issue of low Mexican wage rates, saying labor protections should be strengthened.

    Government records show that on Jan 24, 2014 — almost three years before the Sept. 30, 2016, inauguration of the Audi plant — the company signed a union contract that specified wages as low as $1.40 per hour, up to $4 per hour. Everybody knows what the conditions are when they apply. These are the wages, this is the union," said union chief Alvaro Lopez Vazquez. "You decide. If you don't like it, you can look elsewhere."


    In Mexico, $2 per hour workers make $40,000 SUVs - ABC News
    Remember when we could fight this by "buying American"?

    Not anymore.

    Slave-made luxury SUVs.....thanks, Hillary!

  8. #8
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loki View Post
    The question is : what will the market bear ?
    The market needs restraint. International trade in slave and child made goods must be brought to a halt.

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    The direct comparison of $2.25/hr to what we have is disingenuous. What does a loaf of bread, an average house, an average car (not an Audi) and so on cost to compare it to.

    Quite some time ago I tried to evaluate a job in Australia I was offered. The number of Australian dollars it paid was less than what I had been getting but IIRC houses were much cheaper, cars were more expensive, food was cheaper but utilities were more expensive so it was very hard to compare.
    Thanks from Madeline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loki View Post
    If you want to see poverty, check out India or Sudan. They cry from the reality, you'll cry just visiting.
    You don't have to go that far.

    Haiti is right here in our hemisphere.

    Fairly short flight from the US of A.
    Thanks from Madeline

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