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Thread: Americans receiving unemployment lowest since 1973

  1. #11
    Dick with my Buzz...Try DebateDrone's Avatar
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    Jobs report for March...130,000 jobs added.

    220,000 new UI applications?

    That does not sound good.




    8:30 A.M. (Eastern) Thursday, May 3, 2018
    UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE WEEKLY CLAIMS
    SEASONALLY ADJUSTED DATA
    In the week ending April 28, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 211,000, an increase of 2,000 from the previous week's unrevised level of 209,000. The 4-week moving average was 221,500, a decrease of 7,750 from the previous week's unrevised average of 229,250. This is the lowest level for this average since March 3, 1973 when it was 221,250.

    https://www.dol.gov/ui/data.pdf

  2. #12
    Self Banned Mister B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Now if we could only keep inflation in check.

    New applications for U.S. jobless benefits increased less than expected last week and the number of Americans receiving unemployment aid fell to its lowest level since 1973, pointing to tightening labor market conditions.

    Initial claims for state unemployment benefits rose 2,000 to a seasonally adjusted 211,000 for the week ended April 28, the Labor Department said on Thursday. Claims dropped to 209,000 in the prior week, which was the lowest level since December 1969.

    Economists polled by Reuters had forecast claims rising to 225,000 in the latest week. The labor market is considered to be near or at full employment. The unemployment rate is at a 17-year low of 4.1 percent, close to the Federal Reserve's forecast of 3.8 percent by the end of this year.

    Feds will leave rates unchanged for now.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/03/us-w...l-28-2018.html

    Yeah... Because more and more Americans are being denied thanks to stricter policies. Especially blacks, Hispanics and single parents.
    Thanks from OldGaffer

  3. #13
    Southern Strategy Liberal OldGaffer's Avatar
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    For most U.S. workers, real wages — that is, after inflation is taken into account — have been flat or even falling for decades, regardless of whether the economy has been adding or subtracting jobs.
    With a third of American workers earning less than a 1968 adjusted minimum wage, having a "job" is not as exciting as it was 50 years ago.

    For most workers, real wages have barely budged for decades | Pew Research Center
    Thanks from labrea and BigLeRoy

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DebateDrone View Post
    Jobs report for March...130,000 jobs added.

    220,000 new UI applications?

    That does not sound good.




    8:30 A.M. (Eastern) Thursday, May 3, 2018
    UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE WEEKLY CLAIMS
    SEASONALLY ADJUSTED DATA
    In the week ending April 28, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 211,000, an increase of 2,000 from the previous week's unrevised level of 209,000. The 4-week moving average was 221,500, a decrease of 7,750 from the previous week's unrevised average of 229,250. This is the lowest level for this average since March 3, 1973 when it was 221,250.

    https://www.dol.gov/ui/data.pdf
    This is the lowest level for this average since March 3, 1973 when it was 221,250.
    How do you see that as bad?

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister B View Post
    Yeah... Because more and more Americans are being denied thanks to stricter policies. Especially blacks, Hispanics and single parents.
    Really, what policy is that?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldGaffer View Post
    With a third of American workers earning less than a 1968 adjusted minimum wage, having a "job" is not as exciting as it was 50 years ago.

    For most workers, real wages have barely budged for decades | Pew Research Center
    October 9, 2014
    That was the Obamaconomy, Real Median Household incomes are higher in the Trumpconomy than at any time during the Obamaconomy.

  7. #17
    Southern Strategy Liberal OldGaffer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libertine View Post
    That was the Obamaconomy, Real Median Household incomes are higher in the Trumpconomy than at any time during the Obamaconomy.
    They have barely kept up with inflation, take off your rose colored glasses.

  8. #18
    Self Banned Mister B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libertine View Post
    Really, what policy is that?
    There's several...but before you go please note that there's only so many McDonald's people can work at. With further degradation of job training programs and educational programs, our nations poor will get poorer and poorer. But you and Trump don't care, do you?

    https://www.cbpp.org/research/federa...y-to-work-gain

    ob training funding has been falling for a number of years, in large part because of the tight caps that the 2011 Budget Control Act and sequestration placed on non-defense discretionary (NDD) programs. Under the Administration’s budget (taking the addendum into account), funding for WIOA job training grants in 2019 would be 22 percent less than its 2010 level, after adjusting for inflation.

    In addition, funding for job training would likely fall substantially in years after 2019 under the President’s budget plan. That’s because the budget calls for sharp cuts in NDD funding after 2019 — under the plan, overall funding for NDD programs in 2028 would be 42 percent below the 2017 level, and 50 percent below the 2010 level, adjusted for inflation.[3] That job training was targeted for such deep cuts in the Administration’s base budget strongly suggests that it would be targeted for deep cuts in future years when the Administration likely again calls for drastic reductions in overall funding for NDD programs.

    The President’s budget also cuts Job Corps by a fourth and cuts another $531.9 million in funding by eliminating three programs that target groups facing unique barriers to work: the Indian and Native American national programs,[4] the Senior Community Service Employment program, and the Migrant and Seasonal Farm Worker program. To be sure, there might be reasons to reduce funding in some areas to invest more in others. But the proposed cuts in training programs overall mean that investing in skills is not a priority for the Administration.[5]

    The budget does include some modest new investments in 2019, though many of these could be in jeopardy after 2019 if the Administration’s proposal for sharp NDD cuts in later years were ultimately adopted. For example, the budget increases funding for apprenticeship programs to $200 million in 2019, up from $95 million in 2017. Apprenticeship programs are important and should be expanded, but they’re just one part of a workforce development strategy (they constitute just 6 percent of the Labor Department’s training and employment services budget in the President’s proposal). The budget also provides an additional $15 million compared to 2017 for reemployment services and for eligibility assessments for certain unemployment insurance recipients, and calls for a larger investment in these services in future years.

    Budget Cuts TANF, Further Reducing Funding for Employment Services and Other Critical Supports
    The budget also cuts the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant and eliminates altogether the related TANF Contingency Fund — a cut of $2.3 billion, or 13 percent, compared to current law. States use TANF funds for short-term income assistance and other crucial supports for struggling families with children, including employment services and job training. The budget would also require states to focus a larger share of their TANF funding on work programs, education and training, and child care. While focusing a larger share of TANF on certain activities that support work is a sound idea, this proposal is problematic both because the 10 percent funding cut will undercut the benefit of increased targeting of resources and because the plan fails to recognize that providing income assistance to families that are very poor is also crucial to helping them regain their economic footing.

    College Made More Expensive for Many Low-Income Students
    The 2019 Trump budget eliminates the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), which supplements Pell Grants for some of the neediest students. The justification is that SEOG funds are not optimally distributed across schools. But rather than change the funding allocation, the Administration wants to eliminate a program that makes college more affordable for 1.5 million of the neediest students in the country — with no replacement.

  9. #19
    Self Banned Mister B's Avatar
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    This didn't work for food stamps and won't work for unemployment benefits, @Libertine. It's unconstitutional.

    https://www.vox.com/policy-and-polit...ance-drug-test

    Republicans in Congress want to make it easier for states to drug test the unemployed before they collect government benefits.

    This is no longer just a wish. Over the past few weeks, the Republican-controlled House and Senate sent a bill to President Donald Trump’s desk — which he’s expected to sign — that would undo an Obama-era regulation that limited drug testing for federal unemployment insurance.

    A 2012 law let states drug test and deny benefits to unemployment beneficiaries who work in fields that “regularly conduct drug testing.” But the Department of Labor under President Barack Obama took a narrow interpretation of the law, enacting a rule that made it so only people in fields in which employers randomly drug test after someone is hired can be drug tested for unemployment insurance. That effectively limited how many unemployment beneficiaries states could drug test — by blocking them from enforcing drug screenings for beneficiaries who work in occupations that only drug test as part of the job application process.

    The new bill passed by Congress — almost entirely along partisan lines — overturns the Obama-era rule, giving Trump’s Department of Labor a chance to enact a broader regulation that allows for more drug testing.

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