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Thread: Are virtual, online schools the future?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    I thought you would have taught a few online language arts classes. English and composition classes are very popular online choices for many online and ground campuses.
    Most of my students are upper-division, and our demographic is 80% first-generation college students.

    We're more likely to do flipped classrooms or a hybrid model.
    Last edited by Rasselas; 12th June 2017 at 07:22 PM.

  2. #22
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
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    I can't think of a more dangerous threat to the future of a Western Civilization than "personalized learning". Except maybe it's adult cousin, "personalized news".
    Last edited by Dr.Knuckles; 12th June 2017 at 07:28 PM.
    Thanks from Dragonfly5

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Knuckles View Post
    I can't think of a more dangerous threat to the future of a Western Civilization than "personalized learning". Except maybe "personalized news"
    Funny. Students at my school like the fact that they aren't a number. You've heard of learning styles, right?

  4. #24
    Senior Member libertariat720's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    Not sure what this means, exactly. We should lower standards in order to make education cheaper? Should they allow instructors who are less qualified to teach because they are cheaper to employ (that's by far the biggest cost in higher ed)? Or what do you mean?

    Something like 75% of my campus's budget is for salaries and benefits to faculty, staff, and administrators
    It's turned into a "good ol' boy's club".

    Entrepreneurial educators are attempting to resolve this dilemma by using new business models and new ways of learning, such as through online courses, to slash the cost of a college-level education. These innovations offer the prospect of a fundamental restructuring of higher education with a sharp reduction in costs—a revolution that would be a boon to students seeking to acquire the skills they need in today’s economy.

    Despite the promise presented by these innovations, a considerable obstacle remains: accreditation. A feature of the traditional education system, accreditation is a “seal of approval” granted to institutions of higher education and is intended to assure students that colleges and universities meet certain standards of quality. As a system of quality measurement, however, accreditation is riddled with problems. For example, it favors existing expensive business models for higher education, thereby making it difficult for new models to emerge. Additionally, accreditation rates entire institutions—rather than specific courses—and, as a result, is a poor indicator of the skills acquired by students.

    Accreditation also narrows the number of educational opportunities available to students: In order to receive federal student aid, students must attend an accredited school. While accreditation is technically voluntary, students at an unaccredited college are not eligible for federal student loans and grants. Consequently, as federal student aid and subsidies have become an increasingly larger share of university budgets over the past four decades, for most institutions there is little choice but to seek accreditation.
    Accreditation: Removing the Barrier to Higher Education Reform | The Heritage Foundation

  5. #25
    Senior Member libertariat720's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Knuckles View Post
    I can't think of a more dangerous threat to the future of a Western Civilization than "personalized learning". Except maybe it's adult cousin, "personalized news".
    Why is that?

  6. #26
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    Funny. Students at my school like the fact that they aren't a number. You've heard of learning styles, right?
    Yup. I was a teacher for 12 years. But I also know parents, and I know Parent associations, and I know rural school districts and (shudder) I know private schools.

    You want your neighbors kid learning that Jesus liberated Vietnam in 1975 on a golden dinosaur, and that's why Hindus shouldn't vote? Then by all means, let parents personalize their kids learning.

  7. #27
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by libertariat720 View Post
    Why is that?
    Let me google an example. Stand by.

  8. #28
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
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    Here's just a random example.

    2013 Was a Terrible Year for Evolution? but Only if You Tried to Teach It At a Christian School

    I don't mean to slam Christian schools. The topic isnt important. What's important is that kids whose parents believe in X should be in school with kids whose parents don't believe in X. Bevause it is absolutely vital for society that we do not produce adults raised in fake, artificial bubbles and then thrust into the real world where their "perspective" and "values" and "beliefs" are not shared. It creates angry, confused adults.

    See "Middle East" or "Kentucky".
    Last edited by Dr.Knuckles; 12th June 2017 at 09:31 PM.

  9. #29
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
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    I see all the Muslim kids going to their religious private school on my drive to work in the morning. At 18 they will be punted out of their imaginary world into a Canadian workforce they know nothing about, and expected to function in jobs and universities. All I can think is "hope they're teaching the ugly ones to mop and the cute ones to blow".

    Cause they won't be able to do anything else.

  10. #30
    Senior Member libertariat720's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Knuckles View Post
    Here's just a random example.

    2013 Was a Terrible Year for Evolution? but Only if You Tried to Teach It At a Christian School

    I don't mean to slam Christian schools. The topic isnt important. What's important is that kids whose parents believe in X should be in school with kids whose parents don't believe in X. Bevause it is absolutely vital for society that we do not produce adults raised in fake, artificial bubbles and then thrust into the real world where their "perspective" and "values" and "beliefs" are not shared. It creates angry, confused adults.

    See "Middle East" or "Kentucky".
    Wouldn't that be an argument against standardized teaching?

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