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Thread: Are virtual, online schools the future?

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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Are virtual, online schools the future?

    Interesting, I know so many who are taking classes online nowadays. I think it works well at the high school and collegiate level, but I still think little kids need interaction with other kids.


    The vision was clear throughout the American Federation for Children summit: that schools need to be reinvented with an emphasis on technology. And throughout the gathering, exclusively online schools were a key part of that vision—even though some supporters acknowledge existing virtual schools have not produced strong academic outcomes to date.

    Advocates say that online schools have the potential to harness “personalized learning,” a term that generally means using technology to provide an education tailored to each student’s needs. “The end game … is personalized learning,” said Kevin Chavous, a board member and the executive counsel at AFC, in response to a question about virtual schools. “Every child being shepherded into a schoolhouse where they sit in a classroom and where a teacher stands and delivers, and then they regurgitate back … those days are not going to be the future.”

    Robert Enlow of the group EdChoice described the research on virtual schools as “not great, at the moment,” but pointed out that studies rely on test scores, a limited measure in his view. Enlow said that he had seen evidence that online schools could improve life outcomes for students in a presentation from K12. “The device of making a school virtual—I think we need to preserve the tool,” said Derrell Bradford of the 50-state Campaign for Achievement Now, or 50CAN, which was part of the statement calling for tighter oversight. “At some point, someone’s going to figure out a way to do virtual well.”

    https://www.theatlantic.com/educatio...future/529170/
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    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    Online schools are a joke and I don't know of any employer that takes those degrees seriously.

    College isn't just about learning content, it shows a commitment that you get your ass up every day and show up, you learn social skills, you interact with your professors in a live setting.

    Those are skills employers look for, not simply sitting in your PJ's googling answers.

    I've TA'd in both real college and online courses and I can tell you without a doubt that professors do not give the amount of effort to online courses that they do to campus courses.

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    Moderator HayJenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Interesting, I know so many who are taking classes online nowadays. I think it works well at the high school and collegiate level, but I still think little kids need interaction with other kids.


    The vision was clear throughout the American Federation for Children summit: that schools need to be reinvented with an emphasis on technology. And throughout the gathering, exclusively online schools were a key part of that vision—even though some supporters acknowledge existing virtual schools have not produced strong academic outcomes to date.

    Advocates say that online schools have the potential to harness “personalized learning,” a term that generally means using technology to provide an education tailored to each student’s needs. “The end game … is personalized learning,” said Kevin Chavous, a board member and the executive counsel at AFC, in response to a question about virtual schools. “Every child being shepherded into a schoolhouse where they sit in a classroom and where a teacher stands and delivers, and then they regurgitate back … those days are not going to be the future.”

    Robert Enlow of the group EdChoice described the research on virtual schools as “not great, at the moment,” but pointed out that studies rely on test scores, a limited measure in his view. Enlow said that he had seen evidence that online schools could improve life outcomes for students in a presentation from K12. “The device of making a school virtual—I think we need to preserve the tool,” said Derrell Bradford of the 50-state Campaign for Achievement Now, or 50CAN, which was part of the statement calling for tighter oversight. “At some point, someone’s going to figure out a way to do virtual well.”

    https://www.theatlantic.com/educatio...future/529170/
    Agree that for the college level and maybe some high school classes it's a good idea. But learning is not just what school is all about. It's about learning social skills and hearing different points of view as well.

    Both my kids took a few online courses during college. But in general they liked taking actual classes so that they could have interaction with the professor's and other people in their classes.
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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    Agree that for the college level and maybe some high school classes it's a good idea. But learning is not just what school is all about. It's about learning social skills and hearing different points of view as well.

    Both my kids took a few online courses during college. But in general they liked taking actual classes so that they could have interaction with the professor's and other people in their classes.

    Agree. I see a lot of online classes for working adults so they can get a degree while working easier. That's getting popular. Also in areas like mine many schools cant get the money to hire new teachers for AP classes and such so they do online classes with one of the bigger cities. That way the kids can take the class online and get AP credit whereas otherwise they would have no chance for that.
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    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Agree. I see a lot of online classes for working adults so they can get a degree while working easier. That's getting popular. Also in areas like mine many schools cant get the money to hire new teachers for AP classes and such so they do online classes with one of the bigger cities. That way the kids can take the class online and get AP credit whereas otherwise they would have no chance for that.
    I teach online for both HS and College. I have also been a student, online and ground. In the HS, the Juniors complete a on line program for our discipline but we are in the classroom facilitating. Online for college, puts a lot of motivation on the student. I worked twice as hard as a online student when compared to ground classes. The grading is more stringent because written communication is all you have for the most part. One trend I am noticing, online colleges are beginning to require one or two days of synchronized learning where we meet for a class together. I use a microphone/webcam and Power Points as if in class and take attendance for both days. My personal opinion, if a student is fresh out of HS and young without life or professional experience, ground face to face is better for the student. If a student is a non traditional learner, such as a career changer and older, online probably fits better. 90% or so of my online students work during the day in different healthcare related disciplines. They perform very well in online classes. As far as employers, they really don't care as long as you hold the credentials needed for the job, at least in healthcare. Accreditation is everything with online colleges...the best ones are the colleges that are accredited by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation or CHEA. The expectations for online professors are MUCH higher than ground classes. We have to log in 6 days a week and be very engaged and visible in our classes. I teach many online classes and I basically work 7 days a week in them. I teach a couple of ground classes and am only present 1 or 2 days a week and never think about them until I show up. I earned my Master's degrees online, I ended up with a double major and literally had no life for 2.5 years. I wrote 2 giant research papers a week, one individual one and a group paper that were about 15 to 20 pages each. It was pretty brutal, when I compare it to my bachelor degrees with the exception of Nursing, the first one was a breeze and partied most of my time earning my BBA on campus.

    Online is what you make of it. If you want to learn, you will. If you want to coast, you probably will end up dropping out because the ownership is on you to complete your degree.

    Employers on online education - CNN.com
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    olguy OlGuy's Avatar
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    Going to class has some benefits though back in the day the local fraternity had copies of all the tests given by professors and would send the newbies to sit in class and answer roll. This was for the first two years of basic college courses, so online courses,(probably a little cynical), could be taken by someone else for a profit, and would thin out university costs. Or just focus on engineering or some other science without the basics of art etc

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    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlGuy View Post
    Going to class has some benefits though back in the day the local fraternity had copies of all the tests given by professors and would send the newbies to sit in class and answer roll. This was for the first two years of basic college courses, so online courses,(probably a little cynical), could be taken by someone else for a profit, and would thin out university costs. Or just focus on engineering or some other science without the basics of art etc
    I've written papers for people back when I was a student. I would do my ex's liberal arts stuff and she would do my math.

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    Veteran Member Southern Dad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    Online schools are a joke and I don't know of any employer that takes those degrees seriously.

    College isn't just about learning content, it shows a commitment that you get your ass up every day and show up, you learn social skills, you interact with your professors in a live setting.

    Those are skills employers look for, not simply sitting in your PJ's googling answers.

    I've TA'd in both real college and online courses and I can tell you without a doubt that professors do not give the amount of effort to online courses that they do to campus courses.
    That may be true but recently some very good monikers have joined the online school market like University of Alabama. Perdue University just bought Kaplan University.

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    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    I believe most universities offer online classes, I've taken a few of them myself.

    Those are different from purely online schools at least in the minds of employers I know.

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    Veteran Member Southern Dad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    I believe most universities offer online classes, I've taken a few of them myself.

    Those are different from purely online schools at least in the minds of employers I know.
    Like I said, there are big name universities getting into the online degree market. Not one class, but the full degree. The University of Alabama now has Bama By Distance. The degree will have the name University of Alabama upon it. The University of Maryland has done it for years. Purdue acquires for-profit Kaplan University. What employer is not going to take one of these degrees? These are prestigious schools. Although here in Georgia we do tend to look down upon University of Alabama.
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