Page 5 of 12 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 114
Thanks Tree79Thanks

Thread: Private vs public schools

  1. #41
    Moderator HayJenn's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    54,932
    Thanks
    42468

    From
    CA
    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    No drop off in California. We turned down 20K+ qualified students last year. Not a good time to be a small liberal arts college, though.
    Interesting...good job security for you too

  2. #42
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    47,090
    Thanks
    29088

    From
    New Hampshire
    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    Nor are they even required to subject their students to standardized testing. The DeVos DoE would deliberately avoid requiring these new charters and other schools from being directly compared to public schools. And they wouldn't be subject to the same requirements for special education or classroom diversity.
    I do notice with all these charter schools popping up there are more parents demanding school choice. Now don't get me wrong, I don't like DeVos, but I do think its having an impact. Our gubernatorial election last year pitted a pro school choice republican up against a democrat who wanted to stop charter schools and devote attention back to public schools. People were furious, many felt they would be closed and voted for the republican. I believe we could be witnessing the beginning of a new social issue that divides the parties. A decade ago few even knew what a charter school was, now they have enormous waiting lists. I think its going to be vastly different moving forward as they gain more acceptance.

  3. #43
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    47,090
    Thanks
    29088

    From
    New Hampshire
    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    Interesting - just ran across this article - Universities and colleges struggle to stem big drops in enrollment



    A dip in the birth rate means there are fewer 18- to 24-year olds leaving high schools, especially in the Midwest and Northeast. This has coincided with an even more precipitous decline in the number of students older than 24, who experts say have been drawn back into the workforce as the economy improves, dragging down enrollment at community colleges and private, for-profit universities that provide mid-career education.

    The result is that the number of students in colleges and universities has now dropped for five straight years, according to the National Student Clearinghouse, which tracks this — and this year is the worst so far, with 81,000 fewer high school graduates nationwide heading to places like Ohio Wesleyan, whose entering freshman class is down 9 percent from last year.

    How dramatic is the falloff? There were just over 18 million students enrolled in higher education nationally in the semester just ended — 2.4 million fewer than there were in the fall of 2011, the most recent peak, the National Student Clearinghouse reports.

    Universities and colleges struggle to stem big drops in enrollment - The Hechinger Report
    We are seeing huge school closures up here. Way fewer kids means far less need for so many classes, teachers and buildings. We also are seeing things like youth soccer, baseball football leagues ending as well due to lack of children. I read where 40 states are looking at horrific aging while the other 10 or so are using immigration as a way to keep enrollments up.

  4. #44
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    47,090
    Thanks
    29088

    From
    New Hampshire
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy View Post
    It says a lot when the politicians in charge of our education system send their own kids to private schools.
    When my kids were in school the superintendents all sent their kids to private schools. Parents got pissed and demanded that be a rule. But we ended up not able to secure decent candidates so they changed the rule back. Many of my last childs teachers were recommending the local charter schools. They were sending their kids there. It was disturbing to see a teacher teaching and telling parents at conferences, "go register and get on the waiting list over there, far better." What the hell is that?

  5. #45
    Veteran Member
    Joined
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    65,797
    Thanks
    37343

    From
    in my head
    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    I do notice with all these charter schools popping up there are more parents demanding school choice. Now don't get me wrong, I don't like DeVos, but I do think its having an impact. Our gubernatorial election last year pitted a pro school choice republican up against a democrat who wanted to stop charter schools and devote attention back to public schools. People were furious, many felt they would be closed and voted for the republican. I believe we could be witnessing the beginning of a new social issue that divides the parties. A decade ago few even knew what a charter school was, now they have enormous waiting lists. I think its going to be vastly different moving forward as they gain more acceptance.
    Hard to tell. Lots of times new products are produced for market and they are popular for a time, then less so as the drawbacks appear. I don't have that much problem with school choice so long as the choices are public schools. There's lots of evidence to show that schools with specialized missions tend in general to create better results than schools that try to be all things to all students. There's no reason to have huge high schools, for example, that offer every program under the sun. That's a choice we made some 60 years ago or so as smaller high schools were consolidated into bigger schools.

    We have to be concerned about the students who are left behind in schools that are less popular (and thus lose money and ultimately quality) and about the resegregation of our schools as parents make choices that divide up by ethnicity and/or SES.

    Plus the actual results of charters are underwhelming.
    Thanks from splansing and HayJenn

  6. #46
    Veteran Member
    Joined
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    65,797
    Thanks
    37343

    From
    in my head
    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    When my kids were in school the superintendents all sent their kids to private schools. Parents got pissed and demanded that be a rule. But we ended up not able to secure decent candidates so they changed the rule back. Many of my last childs teachers were recommending the local charter schools. They were sending their kids there. It was disturbing to see a teacher teaching and telling parents at conferences, "go register and get on the waiting list over there, far better." What the hell is that?
    One thing that shows me is that schools get better naturally when parents are MAKING choices and select schools intentionally. That alone suggests more involved parents and families whose life centers at least partly around school. If every family made school a priority, schools would do just fine. By making a deliberate choice, you put your child in a better class of students because they come from more organized families.

    The real author of so many social ills is the disorganized family.
    Thanks from bajisima

  7. #47
    Veteran Member Isalexi's Avatar
    Joined
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    35,203
    Thanks
    22067

    From
    Maryland
    Make public schools smaller and have schools within. We had three stories and on each floor was a different mini school and it was fantastic
    Thanks from bajisima

  8. #48
    Banned Camp
    Joined
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    13,513
    Thanks
    3319

    From
    California
    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Boy have times changed. Now it seems a lot of people prefer private schools, all ours have enormous waiting lists. Fifteen years ago when my eldest was in jr high they were begging for students as they had tons of openings. What's changed?

    "As another school year begins, Americans believe private schools provide students with the best K-12 education of five different types of schools in the U.S. The 71% who rate the quality of private school education as excellent or good exceeds the ratings for parochial, charter, home and public schooling, in that order. The 71% of Americans who rate private school education positively is only a bit higher than the 63% positive rating for parochial schools but far outpaces the percentages for charter schools (55%), home schooling (46%) and public schools (44%)."

    There are greater differences by party identification. Republicans are more positive than Democrats about parochial, charter and home schooling, and Democrats are more positive than Republicans about public schooling.

    Still, both party groups rank private schooling as the most effective, with 76% of Republicans and 68% of Democrats saying it provides students with an excellent or good education. Parochial schools rank second for both. However, charter schools rank third among Republicans, followed by home schooling and then public schools. For Democrats, charter schools tie with public schools at 48%, while home schooling is rated worst at 38%.

    Private Schools First, Public Schools Last in K-12 Ratings | Gallup
    Bajisima,

    Judging from my experience from my nieces and my friend's kids, private schools are heads and shoulders above public. Public schools tend to just be day care centers, whereas, private schools actually teach. My one niece went to private schools from grade 1 through grade 11. She decided to go to public schools her senior year, and was in essence, was taught subjects she had already learned in her sophomore and junior years.

    Pretty much all my other nieces and friends kids who went to private school scored very high on their SATs and got accepted into prestigious colleges.

    I will say that the part of New Jersey where my brother lives has an excellent program for separating the wheat from the chaff. There are several regional specialty high schools (concentrating in Arts, Science, Math) that you have to compete to get into, and where students don't have to associate with the riff raff. His kids seem to be flourishing in that environment.

  9. #49
    Established Member
    Joined
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    4,092
    Thanks
    1165

    From
    South FL
    ....indeed....better and cheaper where I'm at. If our district was able to send our children to the nearest private school our property taxes would be reduced by 25%.

  10. #50
    Senior Member
    Joined
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    10,545
    Thanks
    1738

    From
    Banned
    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    No drop off in California. We turned down 20K+ qualified students last year. Not a good time to be a small liberal arts college, though.
    MOOCs will be the big disrupter in University level education. In a decade that is how most grad and undergrad learning will be delivered. Students will get to study under the finest instructors in the world, no matter where either is located for a low cost. The superstar instructors will be wealthy rockstars and students will no longer have to suffer through mediocre teachers with tenure.


    mooc.org | Massive Open Online Courses | An edX Site

Page 5 of 12 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. DeVos' impact on public schools
    By Dittohead not! in forum Political Humor
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 8th February 2017, 06:35 AM
  2. Real free market schools outperform public schools
    By NonPartisanCapitalist in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 150
    Last Post: 8th October 2012, 01:20 PM
  3. Public Schools
    By Faithful One in forum Education
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12th May 2009, 11:01 AM
  4. How Would You Reform Our Public Schools?
    By Mrs Behavin in forum Education
    Replies: 321
    Last Post: 29th April 2009, 07:04 AM
  5. More Nazi Tactics In Public schools
    By conservative in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 14th March 2008, 12:50 PM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed