Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 68
Thanks Tree33Thanks

Thread: Private vs public schools

  1. #1
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    40,210
    Thanks
    23706

    From
    New Hampshire

    Private vs public schools

    Boy have times changed. Now it seems a lot of people prefer private schools, all ours have enormous waiting lists. Fifteen years ago when my eldest was in jr high they were begging for students as they had tons of openings. What's changed?

    "As another school year begins, Americans believe private schools provide students with the best K-12 education of five different types of schools in the U.S. The 71% who rate the quality of private school education as excellent or good exceeds the ratings for parochial, charter, home and public schooling, in that order. The 71% of Americans who rate private school education positively is only a bit higher than the 63% positive rating for parochial schools but far outpaces the percentages for charter schools (55%), home schooling (46%) and public schools (44%)."

    There are greater differences by party identification. Republicans are more positive than Democrats about parochial, charter and home schooling, and Democrats are more positive than Republicans about public schooling.

    Still, both party groups rank private schooling as the most effective, with 76% of Republicans and 68% of Democrats saying it provides students with an excellent or good education. Parochial schools rank second for both. However, charter schools rank third among Republicans, followed by home schooling and then public schools. For Democrats, charter schools tie with public schools at 48%, while home schooling is rated worst at 38%.

    Private Schools First, Public Schools Last in K-12 Ratings | Gallup
    Thanks from Rorschach and aboutenough

  2. #2
    Scucca Æthelfrith's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,756
    Thanks
    1367

    Equality of opportunity is paramount! This means that a 'comprehensive education', run by government, is best (both in terms of equity and efficiency criteria). To maintain high localised standards, regulation just needs to be engineered to test School 'value added' scores every 3-4 years.

  3. #3
    Veteran Member PACE's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    20,918
    Thanks
    17820

    From
    None of your business
    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Boy have times changed. Now it seems a lot of people prefer private schools, all ours have enormous waiting lists. Fifteen years ago when my eldest was in jr high they were begging for students as they had tons of openings. What's changed?

    "As another school year begins, Americans believe private schools provide students with the best K-12 education of five different types of schools in the U.S. The 71% who rate the quality of private school education as excellent or good exceeds the ratings for parochial, charter, home and public schooling, in that order. The 71% of Americans who rate private school education positively is only a bit higher than the 63% positive rating for parochial schools but far outpaces the percentages for charter schools (55%), home schooling (46%) and public schools (44%)."

    There are greater differences by party identification. Republicans are more positive than Democrats about parochial, charter and home schooling, and Democrats are more positive than Republicans about public schooling.

    Still, both party groups rank private schooling as the most effective, with 76% of Republicans and 68% of Democrats saying it provides students with an excellent or good education. Parochial schools rank second for both. However, charter schools rank third among Republicans, followed by home schooling and then public schools. For Democrats, charter schools tie with public schools at 48%, while home schooling is rated worst at 38%.

    Private Schools First, Public Schools Last in K-12 Ratings | Gallup
    I'm not so much a fan of private schools, parochial in particular, here's why, while they did Iowa testing when my child attended Catholic school, they did not allow for comparison to the public school system, which is wrong. Further, their inability to accurately report on the alumni college statistics, made me suspicious.

    What I had to do was this, take the schools ranking and compare it myself to the public school system; the finding were abysmal; math and science was substandard, the liberal course, writing, English, etc., were on par with the public school system. And I was paying, on top of taxes, for that privilege.

    This didn't have an effect on my child's academics; her education was supplemented at home, so I am not so sure, that private schools are all they are cracked up to be.

    When they start using the exact same metrics as a public school, then I'll be interested in this discussion, until then, it's a little underhanded to resist comparative analysis.

    Lastly, the real estate value is greatly affected by the school systems in towns and counties; to not have accurate reporting, is a detriment to those statistics.

    Regards
    Pace

  4. #4
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    40,210
    Thanks
    23706

    From
    New Hampshire
    Quote Originally Posted by PACE View Post
    I'm not so much a fan of private schools, parochial in particular, here's why, while they did Iowa testing when my child attended Catholic school, they did not allow for comparison to the public school system, which is wrong. Further, their inability to accurately report on the alumni college statistics, made me suspicious.

    What I had to do was this, take the schools ranking and compare it myself to the public school system; the finding were abysmal; math and science was substandard, the liberal course, writing, English, etc., were on par with the public school system. And I was paying, on top of taxes, for that privilege.

    This didn't have an effect on my child's academics; her education was supplemented at home, so I am not so sure, that private schools are all they are cracked up to be.

    When they start using the exact same metrics as a public school, then I'll be interested in this discussion, until then, it's a little underhanded to resist comparative analysis.

    Lastly, the real estate value is greatly affected by the school systems in towns and counties; to not have accurate reporting, is a detriment to those statistics.

    Regards
    Pace
    Charter schools seems to be a big deal up here these days. It seems every parent is on a waiting list for one. Of course many of the ones up here are run by MIT and various educators and professors with a heavy lean on STEM courses. So I think that's a big attraction for some. Quite a few public schools have lost so much funding that they have dramatically cut back on AP courses and the dedicated parents seem to want that AP experience. I also know having just graduated my last, that colleges look to be preferring charter and private school kids. One of our friends works at Dartmouth and he readily admits public school kids are last on the list. Which saddens me. That means they prefer wealthier kids that can afford better.
    Thanks from labrea

  5. #5
    Vexatious Correspondent Leo2's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,225
    Thanks
    2753

    From
    UK/Australia
    I am the educational product, thus far, of one of the great English Public Schools (very expensive and exclusive private schools for those not familiar) and whilst I acknowledge the standard of education available - I am opposed to that concept for general education. Like one's healthcare, one's standard of education should not be dependent upon one's parents' ability to pay obscene sums every year (the fees for a boarder at my old school start at £38,100 a year, to which there are many additions, bringing the total to nearer £50,000). I was lucky that my father was in the position to leave an educational trust for me, but how many parents can afford between $US.50,000 and $US.65,000 per child per year?

    State or government schools should be properly funded, and whilst parents should enjoy the choice of sending their offspring to exclusive and expensive private institutions if they so wish, the standard of public education should be high enough to render that unnecessary.

    We can spend billions on killing people, but ensuring the next generation is healthy and well-educated seems to be outside our range of values.
    Thanks from labrea

  6. #6
    Veteran Member PACE's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    20,918
    Thanks
    17820

    From
    None of your business
    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Charter schools seems to be a big deal up here these days. It seems every parent is on a waiting list for one. Of course many of the ones up here are run by MIT and various educators and professors with a heavy lean on STEM courses. So I think that's a big attraction for some. Quite a few public schools have lost so much funding that they have dramatically cut back on AP courses and the dedicated parents seem to want that AP experience. I also know having just graduated my last, that colleges look to be preferring charter and private school kids. One of our friends works at Dartmouth and he readily admits public school kids are last on the list. Which saddens me. That means they prefer wealthier kids that can afford better.
    My experience with AP is that I paid for the classes, and because my kid was AP centric in high school, public school, I paid dearly, Dartmouth is using "ole thinking"; the engineering schools aren't doing that, they are actively seeking students for all walks of life, international and domestic, because the math and science community is suffering, world wide, there is a concerted effort by tech companies to push this goal in the major engineering schools and universities, University of Arizona, and Edinburgh are good example. The multicultural experience is also beneficial to prepare students upon entry in the world of commerce, engineering, science, whatever.

    Darthmouth's "ole think" won't serve them well going forward. Same goes for other ivy leagues that do this, certainly that model is changing in other top universities.

    Regards
    Pace

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
    Joined
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    59,972
    Thanks
    32194

    From
    in my head
    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Charter schools seems to be a big deal up here these days. It seems every parent is on a waiting list for one. Of course many of the ones up here are run by MIT and various educators and professors with a heavy lean on STEM courses. So I think that's a big attraction for some. Quite a few public schools have lost so much funding that they have dramatically cut back on AP courses and the dedicated parents seem to want that AP experience. I also know having just graduated my last, that colleges look to be preferring charter and private school kids. One of our friends works at Dartmouth and he readily admits public school kids are last on the list. Which saddens me. That means they prefer wealthier kids that can afford better.
    What you're describing is the beginning of a death spiral for public schools.

    As for Dartmouth, it and all the other Ivies have enough endowment that they could operate without charging tuition at all. They could simply admit the brightest and most capable students in the country without regard to ability to pay. They don't and wouldn't consider the possibility. Why? Because they trade on prestige and you can't have prestige if you let the riffraff in...even if they are smart riffraff.
    Last edited by Rasselas; 21st August 2017 at 08:08 AM.
    Thanks from Ian Jeffrey, labrea and bajisima

  8. #8
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    47,976
    Thanks
    22521

    From
    Vulcan
    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    What you're describing is the beginning of a death spiral for public schools.
    And thus of the opportunity for most to even get an education.
    Thanks from labrea, bajisima and Rasselas

  9. #9
    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
    Joined
    May 2012
    Posts
    55,636
    Thanks
    10152

    From
    By the wall
    Sorry but public just can't compete with private schools.

    My ex teaches for one and it is just superior in every way.

    Class sizes are small, there is no pop culture allowed and everyone wears a uniform.

    Its about the learning and their scores prove that it works.
    Thanks from publius3

  10. #10
    Vexatious Correspondent Leo2's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,225
    Thanks
    2753

    From
    UK/Australia
    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    Sorry but public just can't compete with private schools.

    My ex teaches for one and it is just superior in every way.

    Class sizes are small, there is no pop culture allowed and everyone wears a uniform.

    Its about the learning and their scores prove that it works.
    That is so, but it is also a bit like saying a Toyota Corolla simply can't compete at every level with a Bentley Continental. That is certainly the status quo where education, health, justice, etc. is concerned in a predominantly materialistic society, but the question needs to be asked - is that best of all possible societies? Is it not desirable that we change our priorities to ensure a greater level of equality of opportunity for the have-nots. The alternative being societally supported elitism, plutocratic rule, and the emergence of a poorly educated, unhealthy, and often violent underclass, necessitating the privileged few to live in gated communities, and employ bodyguards. Who would want that for his society?
    Thanks from labrea

Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. DeVos' impact on public schools
    By Dittohead not! in forum Political Humor
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 8th February 2017, 06:35 AM
  2. Real free market schools outperform public schools
    By NonPartisanCapitalist in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 150
    Last Post: 8th October 2012, 01:20 PM
  3. Public Schools
    By Faithful One in forum Education
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12th May 2009, 11:01 AM
  4. How Would You Reform Our Public Schools?
    By Mrs Behavin in forum Education
    Replies: 321
    Last Post: 29th April 2009, 07:04 AM
  5. More Nazi Tactics In Public schools
    By conservative in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 14th March 2008, 12:50 PM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed