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Thread: Reading Clinton Aloud

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmiller1610 View Post

    So here is the point of the thread. If you were to riff off this concept and pick right wing american women who persisted, whom would you pick?
    Ayn Rand, but horror stories are more suitable for High schoolers.

  2. #12
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    Ann Coulter.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    I have a serious question--persisted against what? I mean, we can certainly name right-wing American women who have been successful in various ways, and any success requires some sort of persistence, but something tells me that Clinton's book is about a particular kind of persistence...probably persistence against powerful forces that opposed them. Not sure how the women who've been mentioned so far qualify. I'm not denying that they did, but I'd like to hear that part of their biographies.

    The thing is, "right wing" pretty much by definition is about aligning with the rich and powerful rather than opposing them.

    How about Camille Paglia? She persists against the whole feminist-leaning world of the humanities.
    The stories vary, persisting against physical handicaps (Helen Keller), against social injustice (multiple examples), against the low expectations of parents, against physical barriers (such as a great athlete might face), against perceived social limitations (Women can't do that!).

    Condi Rice faced the same barriers as any black woman who grew up in the south, so she was the first one that came to my mind.

    I tailored my presentation by repeating several ideas: knowing what is right in your heart and persisting in your opinion, aiming high to accomplish something that is hard, visualizing a future and looking for pathfinders you can emulate. I tried to give the 2nd graders different hooks to match their own talents because telling them they SHOULD do all those things or persist in all those ways is just a bunch of noise. And since you don't know the children I tried to illustrate in different ways just as Clinton's book did.
    Last edited by kmiller1610; 27th October 2017 at 07:44 PM.
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmiller1610 View Post
    The stories vary, persisting against physical handicaps (Helen Keller), against social injustice (multiple examples), against the low expectations of parents, against physical barriers (such as a great athlete might face), against perceived social limitations (Women can't do that!).
    Not sure why you associate these people or struggles with the left wing. Honestly, that last one is hard for me to associate with the right wing, since an women who succeeds in right-wing politics has to comport herself in ways that don't upset traditionalists, since traditionalists hold a lot of power in right-wing circles. That's part of the "conservative" identity, no?

    Condi Rice faced the same barriers as any black woman who grew up in the south, so she was the first one that came to my mind.
    Agreed. And she's certainly right-wing. But the barriers she faced weren't right-wing barriers, or if they were, her status as a right-wing thinker HELPED her against those barriers. Perhaps the most impressive thing about her is that she achieved first as a concert pianist and only later as a diplomat. A unique skill combination that must have led to an interesting life. I admire Arthur Brooks (violin) of the AEI for the same thing, even when I'm disagreeing with his conclusions about things.

    I tailored my presentation by repeating several ideas: knowing what is right in your heart and persisting in your opinion, aiming high to accomplish something that is hard, visualizing a future and looking for pathfinders you can emulate. I tried to give the 2nd graders different hooks to match their own talents because telling them they SHOULD do all those things or persist in all those ways is just a bunch of noise.
    Sounds like you done good.
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    Not sure why you associate these people or struggles with the left wing. Honestly, that last one is hard for me to associate with the right wing, since an women who succeeds in right-wing politics has to comport herself in ways that don't upset traditionalists, since traditionalists hold a lot of power in right-wing circles. That's part of the "conservative" identity, no?

    Agreed. And she's certainly right-wing. But the barriers she faced weren't right-wing barriers, or if they were, her status as a right-wing thinker HELPED her against those barriers. Perhaps the most impressive thing about her is that she achieved first as a concert pianist and only later as a diplomat. A unique skill combination that must have led to an interesting life. I admire Arthur Brooks (violin) of the AEI for the same thing, even when I'm disagreeing with his conclusions about things.

    Sounds like you done good.
    My original point is that a number of the women in the book were progressive heroes. In fact the title itself is based on an Elizabeth Warren episode (this is according to the instructions we were given as readers).

    But folks who are associated with right wing causes can be heroes too and often in the exact same ways.

    One funny thing that happened. I try to be goofy during such a heavy exploration of amazing people. So when we got to the American dancer who broke through the "Russians only" barrier, I talked about my one and only ballet class and showed how the simplest thing can be painful, so I did a simple Plie, the only thing I learned from my one class. I said that even though I did not persist as a ballet dancer, I can still do that one move.

    Any resemblance between a beer bellied 66 year old and a ballerina aside, when the class was over and I asked if they had any questions, two of the children asked me to do that squat thing again.

    Cool.
    Last edited by kmiller1610; 28th October 2017 at 05:36 AM.
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    Isn't it surprising that the school was using the Read Aloud program to promote liberal politicians. I'm shocked, shocked mind you.

    I got complaints when I read Shel Silverstein's poetry to a third-grade class. The kids enjoyed it but the teachers didn't.

    The final straw was when I expected a third-grade class and was shifted to a sixth-grade class. I got a book I was reading out of my attache case and read from Hiking the Yellowstone Backcountry. When I finished reading about bears and other health hazards I asked the class if there were any words they didn't know. Every hand went up. I asked one what the words were.
    :Giardiasis." All the hands went down. "What do you think that is?"
    "It some kind of sickness you get from drinking water cows have pooped in."
    "What more do you need to know?" After a moment the kids laughed.

    "This means you're quite ready to read whatever you want." I shouldn't have said that. The idea that people can read whatever they want is anathema to the left. Control, control, control.

  7. #17
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    Betty Ford.

    She showed women that there is no moral class when it come to addition. That even the very most moral can succumb to addiction and a woman's social status is not protection.
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmiller1610 View Post
    My wife signed the two of us up for this reading event at one of the local elementary schools.

    We had already signed up and I was committed when I discovered I would be reading Chelsea Clinton's book "She Persisted" to 2nd graders.

    The book is only about the persistence of American Women and many of them are Democrat heroines.

    This perfectly positive book allowed us readers to answer questions and riff off the book for about half an hour.

    Of course being that I am a Republican and there wasn't anyone who had any obvious connections to Republican heroines, I had to bite my tongue a bit, but I do live in a blue state and this is a local school, run by local folks, so what should I expect?

    Chelsea Clinton?s children?s book She Persisted, reviewed.

    So here is the point of the thread. If you were to riff off this concept and pick right wing american women who persisted, whom would you pick?
    Write ONE.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickt View Post
    Isn't it surprising that the school was using the Read Aloud program to promote liberal politicians. I'm shocked, shocked mind you.

    I got complaints when I read Shel Silverstein's poetry to a third-grade class. The kids enjoyed it but the teachers didn't.

    The final straw was when I expected a third-grade class and was shifted to a sixth-grade class. I got a book I was reading out of my attache case and read from Hiking the Yellowstone Backcountry. When I finished reading about bears and other health hazards I asked the class if there were any words they didn't know. Every hand went up. I asked one what the words were.
    :Giardiasis." All the hands went down. "What do you think that is?"
    "It some kind of sickness you get from drinking water cows have pooped in."
    "What more do you need to know?" After a moment the kids laughed.

    "This means you're quite ready to read whatever you want." I shouldn't have said that. The idea that people can read whatever they want is anathema to the left. Control, control, control.
    Then HOW COME its the TEXAS SCHOOL BOOK COMMISSION, always headed by CONSERVATIVES (& crazies), had the MOST influence on school books for the entire country? You know, what people could read. Kids could learn!! The list of additions and deletions from these fucking fools is legendary. At least in the electronic world, the textbook companies should be able to insert FACTS into schoolbooks. Maybe even the occasional WOMAN or person of COLOR for books sent to other states besides TEXAS!

    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2012/06/21/how-texas-inflicts-bad-textbooks-on-us/


    These are 10 of the winners, as seen by a TEXAS PAPER, with ridic--I mean commentary, of the 'facts' 'flavor' for inclusion by the Texas School Book Commission written for Texas students. This from 5 years ago. Maybe things have gotten better. I doubt by much!

    (NOTE: In short--the State of CA wrote a law as a countermeasure so they didn't get stuck with TEXAS' version of the truth. They have approval rights over textbooks coming into their state for recommendations from the Texas Commission)



    10. Moses basically invented the United States. Surprising, we know. We honestly were under the impression that the Founding Fathers - though all likely versed in biblical scripture - relied pretty heavily on people like John Locke and company, but it seems we were misinformed, as far as these textbooks go. One textbook asks students, "Where did the Founders get their ideas?" To our surprise, Moses (as in Exodus, Ten Plagues, played-by Charlton Heston Moses) is at the top of the list. The book follows up with Locke, Charles de Montesquieu and William Blackstone, but Moses and his stone tablets are definitely leading the pack.

    Sure, Thomas Jefferson was basically cribbing from Locke when he wrote the Declaration of Independence, but really Moses was the one who helped start it all, according to this textbook (and we are using the term "textbook" very lightly.) Heck, it's been clearly documented how the ideas of Locke, Montesquieu and Blackstone contributed to the country's founding documents (Locke's central ideas are either paraphrased or alluded to in the Declaration of Independence, while Montesquieu and Blackstone get mention in the Federalist Papers), but it turns out that Moses did all the heavy lifting first.

    According to Perfection Learning's textbook, the "concept" that Moses supposedly contributed to the founders: "A nation needs a written code of behavior." And thus Moses gets the credit. Then, in a delightful bit of embroidery, Moses and Solomon share credit for helping plant the seeds of democracy "deep in human history." We just won't even bother to mention in the text that Moses was more into theocracy than democracy, and Solomon was a monarch, and one who believed that cutting a baby in half was a pretty fair form of justice. But yeah, sure. It was all thanks to those two.

    9. "Much of the violence you read about in the Middle East is related to jihad." Really? It's that simple, is it? We had no idea that all of the many tensions, tendencies and complexities - economics, natural resources, population pressures and all - that are the makeup of the complicated political, social and economic world that is the Middle East were just the cause of one little old holy war. Man, if we had known this sooner, perhaps there would be peace in the Middle East by now. Someone should hurry up and carry Active Classroom: World History over the big water to that sandy place that probably looks exactly like the cartoon world of Aladdin (complete with talking parrots) right this second. Someone needs to call President Obama right this second and say the answer to ISIS and the civil war in Syria and the mess in Iraq and the whole Israel/Palestine conflict is to be had in the pages of this one book. Send it to Congress too. Because it's all related to jihad. We'll bet hundreds of years of conflict over religion and, you know, oil have nothing to do with anything. Not a smidge.

    8. Hindus are strict vegetarians. Did y'all Hindus hear that? If you are having a piece of chicken while reading this, drop it immediately. According to the textbooks created along the guidelines arbitrated by the Lone Star State, you are totally doing your whole religion incorrectly. Hey, we know some Shaivites aren't even vegetarian and that Brahmins get to eat fish and other meat, but the textbook says no meat for y'all. And these textbooks are always right. Kind of. Also, selfishness is the only form of desire, Buddhists. Adjust accordingly.

    7. Mark Twain may have named the Gilded Age, but he was obviously wrong about it. The Gilded Age was the best. Seriously, according to some of these textbooks, from the 1870s to about 1900, life was just grand in the United States, despite what Twain, that grouchy old writer, had to say about it. Everyone was happy. Everybody was optimistic and whistling while they worked in factories that were perfectly safe. There definitely wasn't desperate poverty amongst millions of European immigrants pouring into this country. The fact that women couldn't vote - and wouldn't be able to until 1920 - wasn't a big deal at all. See, they could get married, work as servants or shop girls, go work in factories or have low-paying but utterly respectable jobs as teachers. Plenty of options. Plus, Social Darwinism became a thing about this time, and that whole "survival of the fittest" mindset, as applied to human society, really made for a caring society. See, Twain was critical, but "most Americans were not as cynical. The dizzying array of things to do and buy convinced the growing middle class that modern America was in a true golden age," according to Pearson Education's United States History: 1877 to the Present. Sure. Whatever.

    6. Nothing good has happened in society since 1927. "In the words of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., taxes are 'what we pay for civilized society.' Society does not appear to be much more civilized today than it was when Justice Holmes made that observation in 1927," according to MacGruder's American Government. Right, creating Social Security, ending segregation, the Civil Rights Act, the Violence Against Women Act, the Clean Water Act. Nope, none of that has made us more "civilized."

    5. Apparently we still say "negro"? "South of the Sahara Desert most of the people before the Age of Explorations were black Africans of the Negro race," according to World History A: Early Civilizations to the Mid-1880s. So "Negro" is suddenly an acceptable term to be used in a friggin' school textbook. It's pointed out in the report that use of the term is "archaic and fraught with ulterior meaning." Reading that one sentence makes us intensely curious about what the authors of this textbook had to say about the rest of early civilization. Both curious and afraid.

    4. The Native Americans hung out with the Pilgrims and the whole thing turned out just fine for Squanto and his buddies. "In the fall of 1621, the Pilgrims included their new Wampanoag friends in a feast of thanksgiving," according to United States History to 1877. Basically, just picture the sharing of corn and pie (because there's always pie at Thanksgiving.) And that's pretty much how things go for the Native Americans right up until they get to Little Big Horn. There's no mention of the many tensions and problems, of smallpox, or Manifest Destiny or the whole brutal bloody dealings with President Andrew Jackson. Nope, just a friendly thanksgiving. Nothing else to see here. And that whole Little Big Horn thing came out of nowhere. 3. "Harvey Milk was the first openly gay elected official in the United States." Wrong. It's just incorrect. The mayor of San Francisco (as he was called though he was actually elected to the city board of supervisors) was one of the first but he was not the first openly gay official elected to public office (and there plenty of not-so-open ones elected before him.) Other openly gay or officials preceded him, including Kathy Korazchenko, elected to the Ann Arbor city council in 1974, and Elaine Noble, who took her seat in the Massachusetts Legislature in 1974.

    2. The whole segregation thing wasn't that big of a deal. Yep, Brown v. Board of Education only happened because sometimes "the buildings, buses, and teachers for the all-black schools were lower in quality," according to United States Government by McGraw-Hill. Really? That was it? Most of the schools designated for African American children were gleaming marble halls of learning with adequate classrooms, teachers, books and school supplies? The Jim Crow laws didn't place obscene limits on educational opportunities for black people? Well, then we are just flabbergasted. Why on earth did people fight the desegregation of schools so bitterly then? Why did it takes decades to get the schools desegregated - one school district in Odessa, Texas was finally ruled officially desegregated in 2010 - in Texas alone, if it was all so simple? Also, "it seems clear the days of affirmative action programs are drawing to a close," according to MacGruder's American Government. Huh.
    s American Government..
    1. The "Gay Liberation Movement" The "gay liberation movement" -- or as the rest of us call it the gay rights movement -- was totally the same as "social upheaval" and a society that was "spinning out of control," according to American History II: Post-Civil War America to the Present. Because obviously Stonewall and the whole thing about LGBT citizens making strides toward key civil rights advances should be associated with a crumbling society. Probably because society ceased to make any advances in civilization as of 1927. Yup, that must be it.


    Last edited by cpicturetaker12; 15th February 2018 at 06:51 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Idiocracat View Post
    Ann Coulter.
    After all, it is Halloween!

    I think the ScareCoulter is prettier than the real one.

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