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Thread: Best high schools for 2018: most are charter schools

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    seems to be a trend. Even here in new england, most of the top schools were all charters.

    https://www.usnews.com/education/bes...ional-rankings
    NOT in Florida. Half were failing or below average. Now that was 2 years ago, maybe they magically got better.

  2. #12
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    It's THE key question in evaluating what I think is the main implication of your OP. Say you and I are going to play basketball, and we have to choose players from a group of ten available people. You get to choose your five. I take what's left over. Who's going to win?

    I'm not totally opposed to charter schools, but we have to recognize the obvious implications of charter school policy. Any schools that offers a specialized program will tend to draw families who are more organized, committed, and yes even more wealthy. Kids who come from privileged backgrounds are going to perform better than than someone drawn from a random sample. Comparing schools who have to take all kids from a given geographical area against schools who can recruit the most committed families isn't an even playing field. Compounding this is the fact that all those pre-selected kids are taken out of the random pool, making the non-charters worse in terms of their student bodies. My own kids go to a magnet elementary school that selects by lottery. We prefer that not because we think the teachers will be better but because it's pretty much guaranteed to serve some of the most committed families in our district.

    I looked at how these schools in your OP were selected. The first two (overall performance vs state average and minority student performance vs state average) is going to highly impacted by the selection process of students. The third (availability of and performance after AP and IB coursework) is a function of available funding. Not every school can afford IB or many AP courses--that's a function of funding and community demands.

    In short, I don't think this evidence says that much about the relative quality of charter schools over others. It's more about school policy aimed at further advantaging those of us who are already advantaged.
    So how do you think schools should be measured? I know some say certain tests, but usually most dont like that. Would it be a good idea to separate schools into charter, private, religious, general public? I think they used to do it that way but then they changed.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpicturetaker12 View Post
    NOT in Florida. Half were failing or below average. Now that was 2 years ago, maybe they magically got better.
    Strange almost all those failing schools in FLA are in BLUE COUNTIES

    South Florida schools receive record number of F's - Sun Sentinel
    Last edited by TNVolunteer73; 9th May 2018 at 11:15 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    So how do you think schools should be measured? I know some say certain tests, but usually most dont like that. Would it be a good idea to separate schools into charter, private, religious, general public? I think they used to do it that way but then they changed.
    It would seem such a division into categories, with specific criteria for each, would make sense. Otherwise, you are comparing apples to oranges.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jeffrey View Post
    It would seem such a division into categories, with specific criteria for each, would make sense. Otherwise, you are comparing apples to oranges.
    No it is apples to apples, Children/Parents choose the school if it is a Charter school.

    One Daughter of mine Chose Hume Fogg Academic High School because she wanted to prepare for Economic and German for her college prep.
    One Daughter chose McGavock Comprehensive high school because she wanted to study music.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TNVolunteer73 View Post
    No it is apples to apples, Children/Parents choose the school if it is a Charter school.

    One Daughter of mine Chose Hume Fogg Academic High School because she wanted to prepare for Economic and German for her college prep.
    One Daughter chose McGavock Comprehensive high school because she wanted to study music.
    So how do you decide if a school that focuses on music education is better or worse than a school that focuses on things like economics and languages?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNVolunteer73 View Post
    No it is apples to apples, Children/Parents choose the school if it is a Charter school.
    That depends on the degree to which the charter school can choose which applicants it takes.
    Thanks from HayJenn

  8. #18
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jeffrey View Post
    It would seem such a division into categories, with specific criteria for each, would make sense. Otherwise, you are comparing apples to oranges.
    I can agree as well but the distinctions can be blurred. Its easy to compare public vs religious schools or public vs private schools, but when we add in charter schools and magnet schools that complicates it since they (mostly) are public and there is no extra tuition. For example where I live we have one public high school, and a choice of 4 charters all which are free and the district offers busing. So that makes it hard. From what I also understand, some charters arent being called charters anymore, they just have a name and are within the district. They are a charter school for sure, but they no longer are called ABC charter school. So its possible some dont even realize they are charter schools.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    I can agree as well but the distinctions can be blurred. Its easy to compare public vs religious schools or public vs private schools, but when we add in charter schools and magnet schools that complicates it since they (mostly) are public and there is no extra tuition. For example where I live we have one public high school, and a choice of 4 charters all which are free and the district offers busing. So that makes it hard. From what I also understand, some charters arent being called charters anymore, they just have a name and are within the district. They are a charter school for sure, but they no longer are called ABC charter school. So its possible some dont even realize they are charter schools.
    Hence the need for categorization based on specific criteria. If you compare apples to oranges, then you will get a false set of results that can be twisted to support any agenda.

  10. #20
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StanStill View Post
    So how do you decide if a school that focuses on music education is better or worse than a school that focuses on things like economics and languages?
    They are similar to European schools where the child chooses at grade 9 or so which path they want to take, vocational, collegiate, arts, business etc. They have core subjects for a few hours a day but then spend the rest of the day doing what they love. We have one here that focuses on math and science. They take English, language etc for 3 hours in the morning and then spend the rest of the day on nothing but math and science.

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