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Thread: Best high schools for 2018: most are charter schools

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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Best high schools for 2018: most are charter schools

    Seems to be a trend. Even here in New England, most of the top schools were all charters.

    https://www.usnews.com/education/bes...ional-rankings

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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Seems to be a trend. Even here in New England, most of the top schools were all charters.

    https://www.usnews.com/education/bes...ional-rankings
    I'm wondering how many of those schools get to choose their students.

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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    I'm wondering how many of those schools get to choose their students.
    I have no idea. The charter thing wasnt big when my kids were in school so any knowledge I have is through friends and neighbors. But they all seem onboard. Waiting lists miles long and their kids get recruited for colleges with big scholarships. Met a woman who is fairly high up at MIT in the admissions office and she said they do look at charter school and private school applicants first. So I guess parents know that and want to give them a try.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Seems to be a trend. Even here in New England, most of the top schools were all charters.

    https://www.usnews.com/education/bes...ional-rankings
    I would bet most of those charter schools are new schools. I would further bet that most of all top performing schools are new schools.

    New suburban schools are making marks while old schools in the city proper are dying and are being shut down or consolidated.

    I was totally shocked when I saw a parade with my high school's marching band marching in a recent parade. It was a shell of what I remember. We graduated a class of over 1,100. The total student body is only double that.
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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DebateDrone View Post
    I would bet most of those charter schools are new schools. I would further bet that most of all top performing schools are new schools.

    New suburban schools are making marks while old schools in the city proper are dying and are being shut down or consolidated.

    I was totally shocked when I saw a parade with my high school's marching band marching in a recent parade. It was a shell of what I remember. We graduated a class of over 1,100. The total student body is only double that.
    As far as I know all charter schools are relatively new. I hadnt even heard about them a decade ago. Especially here in New England where the public schools had always won accolades. Now the charter schools have really become popular around here too. Sadly many of the public schools are cutting back on science labs, bands, arts, sports etc. One local public school here lamented that they needed to do something to catch up with the STEM programs at the local charter schools as they were losing students to them. They didnt want to be known as the "jock school."

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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Seems to be a trend. Even here in New England, most of the top schools were all charters.

    https://www.usnews.com/education/bes...ional-rankings
    This is a premier private school that is close to where I live. I have several friends who are sent their kids and now grandchildren to Lake Ridge. This school is very expensive, even with financial assistance. This school does not take vouchers and my friends spent a fortune on their education K-12. Kindergarten is 19K!! Twelfth grade is over 30K. It did pay off, all of their kids are top level professionals, lawyers, physicians, etc.

    https://www.lakeridgeacademy.org/

    The Jock schools around here are Catholic schools and are known for academics. St. Ignatius is a huge football school and Ohio State recruits directly from it. Jock schools can provide a full ride to any College who recruits them. St. Ignatius recruited a co workers son to play football for them and he was not even Catholic but he got a full ride. Private sports schools recruit as aggressively as colleges.

    https://www.ignatius.edu/
    Last edited by HCProf; 9th May 2018 at 08:07 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    I have no idea.
    It's THE key question in evaluating what I think is the main implication of your OP. Say you and I are going to play basketball, and we have to choose players from a group of ten available people. You get to choose your five. I take what's left over. Who's going to win?

    I'm not totally opposed to charter schools, but we have to recognize the obvious implications of charter school policy. Any schools that offers a specialized program will tend to draw families who are more organized, committed, and yes even more wealthy. Kids who come from privileged backgrounds are going to perform better than than someone drawn from a random sample. Comparing schools who have to take all kids from a given geographical area against schools who can recruit the most committed families isn't an even playing field. Compounding this is the fact that all those pre-selected kids are taken out of the random pool, making the non-charters worse in terms of their student bodies. My own kids go to a magnet elementary school that selects by lottery. We prefer that not because we think the teachers will be better but because it's pretty much guaranteed to serve some of the most committed families in our district.

    I looked at how these schools in your OP were selected. The first two (overall performance vs state average and minority student performance vs state average) is going to highly impacted by the selection process of students. The third (availability of and performance after AP and IB coursework) is a function of available funding. Not every school can afford IB or many AP courses--that's a function of funding and community demands.

    In short, I don't think this evidence says that much about the relative quality of charter schools over others. It's more about school policy aimed at further advantaging those of us who are already advantaged.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Seems to be a trend. Even here in New England, most of the top schools were all charters.

    https://www.usnews.com/education/bes...ional-rankings
    Bajisima,

    Also interesting that only 3 of the top 20 are in blue states.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    I'm wondering how many of those schools get to choose their students.
    Many of them are Public Schools.. go Fiigure, Students choose the schools not the School choosing the Students.

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    Also interesting that the top five spots are taken by a single chain of schools in Arizona. That seems a bit unlikely to me. Do they advertise in USN&WR?

    But as Rasselas said, it kind of hinges on whether these "public" schools can tell kids who fall behind that they don't measure up and transfer them out to a truly public school. Or better yet have an entrance exam and prevent the kids who need education the most from ever entering.
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