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Thread: Judge says there's no fundamental right to learn to read and write

  1. #31
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labrea View Post
    Education as a right is included in the constitutions of 174 countries.

    I don't doubt that, but the United States isn't one of those countries. We rely upon the kindness of Congress.
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  2. #32
    Master political analyst Dittohead not!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BDBoop View Post
    Does this mean truancy is no big anymore? I mean, who cares if kids are in school, since there's no reason for them to be there.

    Detroit Free Press



    I'm seriously starting to think that the entire system of governance in America is corrupt. Everybody is on the take, everybody is advancing a fucked-up agenda for no discernible reason.
    If the school system is so deficient that children no longer have an opportunity to learn to read and write, that's OK because they don't have a right to literacy anyway....

    ...Is that really what this is all about?

    If it will take $500 million to get the buildings up to code and adequate for the task of teaching, how much will it cost to actually get a school that serves the needs of the community? There is more to a school than the building. It takes competent administration not hamstrung by bureaucracy, competent teachers given adequate facilities and supplies and not so many students that their job becomes one of simply keeping order, parents who see to it their kids get to school on time and are ready to learn. A lot goes into a successful school.
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  3. #33
    Member Robert Urbanek's Avatar
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    Perhaps the teachers should be suing themselves if they are failing to teach students how to read and write.

  4. #34
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dittohead not! View Post
    If the school system is so deficient that children no longer have an opportunity to learn to read and write, that's OK because they don't have a right to literacy anyway....

    ...Is that really what this is all about?

    If it will take $500 million to get the buildings up to code and adequate for the task of teaching, how much will it cost to actually get a school that serves the needs of the community? There is more to a school than the building. It takes competent administration not hamstrung by bureaucracy, competent teachers given adequate facilities and supplies and not so many students that their job becomes one of simply keeping order, parents who see to it their kids get to school on time and are ready to learn. A lot goes into a successful school.

    Just curious. What are some examples of school administrators being "hamstrung by bureaucracy"?

  5. #35
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Urbanek View Post
    Perhaps the teachers should be suing themselves if they are failing to teach students how to read and write.

    There's no point in suing a teacher. Hell, they're the most dirt poor degreed professionals out there. It would be like squeezing blood from a turnip.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by orangecat View Post
    Judge is correct.
    That opinion seems to be the exception.

    ...the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, whose Article 13 provides expansive assurances of education. In addition, each of these countries—well, almost every country in the world—is also party to the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the most widely accepted human rights treaty in history. The convention, which prohibits among other things the kidnapping and sexual exploitation of children, vigorously asserts the right of a child to education. Of UN members, only Somalia and the United States have not ratified that agreement.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/educatio...cation/280583/

  7. #37
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labrea View Post
    That opinion seems to be the exception.

    I disagree. The judge was not ruling on international law, but on US law.

    We may not like it, but it is what it is.
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  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by excalibur View Post
    Declaring literacy a "right" would mean an endless stream of wacky, money wasting programs that enrich a few, and would substantially result in the same literacy rates.
    How are we going to make america great again when we rank 17th out of 40 countries in education? (them socialist nordic countries out preform us again - whats up with that?)
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  9. #39
    #walkaway orangecat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labrea View Post
    That opinion seems to be the exception.
    I'm an exceptional person living in an exceptional country.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NightSwimmer View Post
    Access to education may be considered a right under international law, but it isn't guaranteed to US citizens under our Constitution. Without legislation, we'd have no public education system, and far too many of us, I'm afraid, would be just fine with that. I'm old enough to remember when our public education system was cherished by most Americans, but that was before the courts stepped in and insisted that it must be equitably provided to everyone.
    Is that when republicans began their assault on free, universal public education?
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