Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 64
Thanks Tree36Thanks

Thread: Attitudes towards Depression

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Joined
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,932
    Thanks
    711

    From
    Not on this forum anymore

    Attitudes towards Depression

    Depression is a major health issue, unfortunately the sort of attitudes going round about it from the general public aren't always the correct attitudes. Perhaps it is just my experience, but some people seem to view it as if it is a contagious disease, and that depressed people are to be avoided or ignored. This is the worst possible attitude to have, before actually harassing people and encouraging them to suicide; as it just isolates people with depression further from society.

    First of all, depression effects every social-economic group, it doesn't matter whether you are rich or poor. You can have everything going for you in life, or realistically have no rational reason to feel like things are too hard for you to go on. Then you can be in a situation where things are truly hard for you in life i.e. relationship or financial problems, and lose the confidence and motivation to leave it behind, meaning there are rational reasons behind it - but being suicidal is not.

    Depression is still something we don't know much about, some argue it is chemical imbalance in the brain that can be corrected through drugs; the heavy advocates of medication argue that you should be medicated indefinitely if you have depression to a serious extent. The alternative position is that drugs should be avoided, and that environmental factors are the cause, and should be removed; and that medication should only be used sparingly.

    Some people recover, while others do not. We simply don't know enough to help everyone recover. In my experience, there simply isn't enough help for people with depression, especially more vulnerable young people.

    When I went through high school there were counselors, and help lines to call if you were depressed. But no actual community support in the school, or any real attempts to actually combat depression and the factors that make it worse. Students feel like no one is there for them, or that they have to keep all their pain inside. Going to school counselors, is always recognized by other students in the school (especially bullies), and there is a very real feeling that going there is a sign of weakness on their part.

    Helplines are staffed by real people, but they aren't any substitute for a real person there 24/7 like a friend or family member. My experience with helplines was not a good one, the first time they offered no support and only listened, eventually they just rang the police and accused them of child abuse; after that they never rang back or offered any further support. I think that is a classic response from governments and schools, to blame the parents, rather than work with the children and the parents to pave a road to recovery (or at the very least ease the circumstances that make the depression worse).

    So for many people with depression, society fails them early on. But that is the case of being young, and struggling with bullying and other factors. There are bad situations in offices too, with co-workers having the wrong attitude towards others in the workplace i.e. putting people down (to an extent that really isn't helpful), and failing to make the workplace at least tolerable for everyone to work in.

    There is no clear answer to resolving depression, some argue it is so bad because the modern world has so many more distractions, and that communities have drifted apart despite things like social media. While others put it down to economics or biological factors out of our control. However, it doesn't help when people ignore 'other people's problems', and think because they don't have depression that it isn't their problem to deal with.

    It is sad to see that some feel that pumping people with drugs, or sending people to psychologists, counselors and helplines; is a real substitute for 24/7 concern and help from friends, family, co-workers; and the community at large. Not saying that people have to throw money at depressed people, but instead just treat them like human beings that need help from those around them - rather than ignoring them due to their negative views or body language. Have to feel as if people just said hello, rather than ignoring those in a bad state, that the world would just get a little brighter. As for the economic statistics, I don't think I really need to underline what has already been said, safe to say it costs businesses, families, and the community at large billions of dollars in the US alone every year.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Joined
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    7,991
    Thanks
    1627

    From
    AK
    The evidence supports CBT, SSRIs and/or vigorous daily exercise as best practice in addressing depression.

    Personally, I think it's over-diagnosed. An alcohol or drug or other addict hits a dead-end with the addiction, guess what? Likely to be "depressed." A person's romantic relationship ends. Depressed. Someone dies. Depressed.

    Depression can be diagnosed by anyone with a master's degree in some social service related field, after someone simply states that they have 5 of the 9 symptoms listed under a Major Depressive Episode in the DSM-IV. Depressed mood, disinterest in daily activities, weigh loss or gain, concentration difficulties, insomnia/hypersomnia, daytime fatigue, psychomotor agitation, feelings of guilt or worthlessness, thoughts of death or suicide. That's all it is. Very broad and common.

    I personally think far fewer people than mainstream statistics suggest truly have what I'd call "real" depression. The rest are going through some sort of life adjustment and/or are dramatizing their own distress.
    Last edited by Neomalthusian; 8th February 2014 at 07:54 PM.
    Thanks from Friday13

  3. #3
    ~Standing My Ground~ Sassy's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    11,139
    Thanks
    2830

    Quote Originally Posted by Neomalthusian View Post
    The evidence supports CBT, SSRIs and/or vigorous daily exercise as best practice in addressing depression.

    Personally, I think it's over-diagnosed. An alcohol or drug or other addict hits a dead-end with the addiction, guess what? Likely to be "depressed." A person's romantic relationship ends. Depressed. Someone dies. Depressed.

    Depression can be diagnosed by anyone with a master's degree in some social service related field, after someone simply states that they have 5 of the 9 symptoms listed under a Major Depressive Episode in the DSM-IV. Depressed mood, disinterest in daily activities, weigh loss or gain, concentration difficulties, insomnia/hypersomnia, daytime fatigue, psychomotor agitation, feelings of guilt or worthlessness, thoughts of death or suicide. That's all it is. Very broad and common.

    I personally think far fewer people than mainstream statistics suggest truly have what I'd call "real" depression. The rest are going through some sort of life adjustment and/or are dramatizing their own distress.
    But if they didn't, how would all the drugs get peddled?

    going through a divorce for instance. You don't need a pill. How about counseling for grief, adjustment, anxiety?
    Thanks from Friday13 and bajisima

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Joined
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    7,991
    Thanks
    1627

    From
    AK
    Quote Originally Posted by Sassy View Post
    But if they didn't, how would all the drugs get peddled?

    going through a divorce for instance. You don't need a pill. How about counseling for grief, adjustment, anxiety?
    I think it's clear a considerable number of people's careers are based on treating normal (unpleasant) life processes like they're specific illness that can be measurably and professionally treated. It's an incredibly soft science, in my opinion.
    Thanks from Friday13

  5. #5
    ~Standing My Ground~ Sassy's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    11,139
    Thanks
    2830

    Quote Originally Posted by Neomalthusian View Post
    I think it's clear a considerable number of people's careers are based on treating normal (unpleasant) life processes like they're specific illness that can be measurably and professionally treated. It's an incredibly soft science, in my opinion.
    Well, a psychiatrist doesn't make any money referring you to a therapist. He makes money by having you come in monthly for scrips.
    Thanks from Friday13

  6. #6
    Senior Member sky writer's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    10,281
    Thanks
    3310

    From
    *
    Depression can be a completely debilitating illness. For the most part, I think conservative attitudes toward mental illness of any kind are harsh, (this very thread demonstrates that). People die of this illness.

    It's pretty serious. It's not just a question of being a little bit sad once and awhile.
    Last edited by sky writer; 8th February 2014 at 09:03 PM.

  7. #7
    ~Standing My Ground~ Sassy's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    11,139
    Thanks
    2830

    Quote Originally Posted by sky writer View Post
    Depression can be a completely debilitating illness. For the most part, I think conservative attitudes toward mental illness of any kind are harsh, (this very thread demonstrates that). People die of this illness.

    It's pretty serious. It's not just a question of being a little bit sad once and awhile.
    Real depression is very serious. It disables and yes, kills people. No one disputed that.

  8. #8
    Senior Member sky writer's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    10,281
    Thanks
    3310

    From
    *
    Quote Originally Posted by Sassy View Post
    Real depression is very serious. It disables and yes, kills people. No one disputed that.
    Your buddy says that few people have "real" depression. That's absolute crap. Stiff upper lip attitudes toward mental illness are fucked up.
    Last edited by sky writer; 8th February 2014 at 09:11 PM.
    Thanks from labrea

  9. #9
    Senior Member sky writer's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    10,281
    Thanks
    3310

    From
    *
    Quote Originally Posted by Sassy View Post
    Well, a psychiatrist doesn't make any money referring you to a therapist. He makes money by having you come in monthly for scrips.
    Yes, doctors get paid for diagnosing illness and prescribing treatments, including medication.
    Thanks from labrea

  10. #10
    ~Standing My Ground~ Sassy's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    11,139
    Thanks
    2830

    Quote Originally Posted by sky writer View Post
    Your buddy says that few people have "real" depression. That's absolute crap. Stiff upper lip attitudes toward mental illness are fucked up.
    Can you refrain from projecting another poster's views on me because I may agree with part of a post?

    I know real depression. It took me years to convince my brother that my mother was not lazy. She was paralyzed.

    She does need medication for it and she is lucky that she has one that works for her very well. She is a completely different person now.

    Or rather, she is who she always was, before that happened to her.
    Thanks from bajisima, Ian Jeffrey and sparsely

Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed