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Thread: Dentist Kills Three Year Old

  1. #21
    Vexatious Correspondent Leo2's Avatar
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    I have not yet had to have any remedial dental work for cavities or tooth decay, but I had a sporting accident which damaged a front tooth a few years ago, and had to have it rebuilt. Even though it involved dental surgery, including stitches, etc. there was no question of a general anaesthetic. The dentist simply gave me a couple of local anaesthetic injections, and I didn't feel a thing during the procedure. Why on earth would you put someone out for a simple procedure such as dentistry? I have a couple of friends who are doing Medicine at the same uni where I am doing Law, and they tell me that a general anaesthetic should be avoided in any circumstances short of major surgery. It is particularly risky for the very young and the very old.
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  2. #22
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    There was recently a case like that in Yekaterinburg, in Russia, anaesthetiologist at local children's clinic dental department was put on trial, for failing to bring a little girl back out of it at the end of her procedure. She went into a coma and died. He was found not criminally responsible; though the clinic will have to still pay out a big compensation to the family. And the doc is in witness protection or whatever now, because girl's dad's fellow ex-special forces friends have promised, after the verdict, to arrange death for him also...
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  3. #23
    told you so Amelia's Avatar
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    Dental infections can be associated with heart disease.

    This child's mouth may have been in very bad shape to need extractions and caps. Maybe that could have led to undiagnosed heart trouble.
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  4. #24
    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo2 View Post
    I have not yet had to have any remedial dental work for cavities or tooth decay, but I had a sporting accident which damaged a front tooth a few years ago, and had to have it rebuilt. Even though it involved dental surgery, including stitches, etc. there was no question of a general anaesthetic. The dentist simply gave me a couple of local anaesthetic injections, and I didn't feel a thing during the procedure. Why on earth would you put someone out for a simple procedure such as dentistry? I have a couple of friends who are doing Medicine at the same uni where I am doing Law, and they tell me that a general anaesthetic should be avoided in any circumstances short of major surgery. It is particularly risky for the very young and the very old.
    This was done at a surgical facility meaning it was rather serious.

    It wasn't your local dentists office.

    I don't know of any surgery that keeps the patient alert unless it's required for the actual surgery.

  5. #25
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jeffrey View Post
    Who determines what is medically necessary? The patient's doctor, or a bureaucrat who has never examined the patient?
    Most insurance companies expect providers to prove medical necessity prior to approving a procedure. This includes a lot of documentation on the behalf of the doctor. I have had patients wait in the hospital for 2 days before treatment or advanced diagnostics are performed. Keeping a bed occupied just waiting on approval is waste IMO. Preauthorizations or precertifications are needed to help with cost control. To answer your question...insurance companies decide based on the level of proof provided by the doctor. Most insurance companies hire RN's to work with approvals so experienced personnel is making the decisions. Most insurance complies employ a medical director, a MD, to make the final decision if needed. Any dental procedure, I would think, would need a light sedative for a toddler. Some anesthesia must be given, the numbing injections are brutal too and without anything, could be pretty painful for anyone. I used to ask for gas before the needle before many stopped using it.
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  6. #26
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    Putting 3 year olds under is common, it's no more danger to them then anyone else.

    I can imagine doing much dental work on a 3 year old would be near impossible if they felt it.

    And I doubt those baby teeth were just wiggling around or the kid would have pulled them out himself. They were probably still rooted in there so I would like to see you get teeth pulled with no anesthesia or nova cane at least.

    But there is always a slight risk when people go under, that's why they warn you and make you sign something.
    I think it might be fairly common. The fear of the dental office can make a child wild. A toddler once kicked my ass while giving a vaccine. Broke loose from the hold and kicked me in the face. I saw stars. That is how wound up a toddler can get and you can't reason with them. If the tooth has rotted and broke off at the gum line, the dentist would have to dig it out. This would warrant anesthesia.

  7. #27
    the "good" prag pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    No insurance, public or private, should reimburse for care that is not medically necessary.

    Children do not begin to get permanent teeth until around age 6. Baby teeth with cavities probably should be dealt with by pulling that tooth and better at-home diet and hygiene.

    There is a risk associated with general anesthesia on anyone, especially a toddler. The dentist should never have considered this risk for this child.

    Congratulations on your new career!

    Have never heard of putting a cap on a baby tooth. Seems bizarre unless there were some kind of extreme special circumstance.

    And applying general anesthesia (not just local and/or a sedative.) should call for an "anesthesiologist quality professional" to be present.
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  8. #28
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    Well there may have been a problem with the incoming adult teeth they need corrected.

    As for the caps I am not sure unless they are talking about that procedure where people put that coating on their teeth that helps fight cavities or whatever it does, I forget what it's called.

    Whenever I get dental work done I always have them put me under unless its really minor.

    I like to see how far I can count backwards until it hits me.

    I found this:

    First Trip to the Dentist




    First Trip to the Dentist
    This is true with any medical encounter with a child. The first health care experiences can determine how well an adult takes care of themselves. A bad experience takes a long time to overcome. The first Dental experience is fun for the toddler if their teeth are not rotting out of their head. If it is only a fun filled check up and not a disaster. I honestly would be embarrassed to take a toddler to the dentist with teeth in that condition. It is completely preventable with hygiene and diet.

  9. #29
    olguy OlGuy's Avatar
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    Hippocratic oath takes backstage for the "acceptable risk" that patients have to take, even if they're too young to acknowledge.
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  10. #30
    the "good" prag pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlGuy View Post
    Hippocratic oath takes backstage for the "acceptable risk" that patients have to take, even if they're too young to acknowledge.
    What does that statement even mean?

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