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Thread: Foot Insurance - A kick in the teeth

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    Then why not make medical checkups elective as well? Why not declare the medical checkups "optional" and have insurance only cover the treatment of specific conditions, as libertariat720 suggested?
    Mr. Djinn,

    Because preventative medicine is not elective. You need them to catch life threatening conditions before they start.

  2. #32
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    Those who undergo routine cleanings twice annually are statistically less likely to require cavity treatment, root canal work, etc. An ounce of prevention vs. a pound of cure.
    I seriously wonder if at some point in history that somebody just figured that if a tooth was bad, one could get a pair of pliers and pull it out. But they cant do that for medical care/surgery etc. So that's why we have what we have. One can live without teeth kind of mentality.

  3. #33
    Anarquistador StanStill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    So under the new Republican health plan being discussed in the Senate, feet, and foot-related conditions are excluded. This doesn't mean there's no coverage, but it means you'll need separate insurance coverage for feet, as related treatments and procedures will not be covered under general insurance plans. This is, of course, a complete lie that I just made up, but it's a good lead-in to my point.

    Dental insurance. Why aren't teeth covered under health insurance plans? Why can one purchase health insurance plans that cover every part of your anatomy, except your teeth? I did some research on the subject, and if my findings are correct, it's because dental care was once a service typically provided by barbers. As such, it didn't qualify as medical, and so when medical insurance became a thing (1850s), it didn't include dental care.

    Is there ANY reason today why dental insurance should remain separate from medical insurance?
    I don't think that your findings are correct. After all, the days when barbers pulled teeth were the days when they did surgeries too. The red and white stripes of the pole represent blood and bandages, and surgeries are covered (provided they aren't cosmetic.) I think the main reason they get away with it is dental visits are something everyone needs to have regularly, they are somewhat expensive, and they've always gotten away with not covering them. It's why eye plans are like the Loch Ness Monster. I've heard people talk about them, but never seen one first hand. And of course at some point in most everyone's life they will need glasses or contacts, and they too are expensive.

    After all, it's a business not a democracy. You'll take what you're offered and you'll stop complaining!

  4. #34
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kallie Knoetze View Post
    ... Because preventative medicine is not elective. You need them to catch life threatening conditions before they start.
    So preventative medicine is not elective - but preventative dentistry is elective? There's no rhyme or reason to this. Diseases originating in the mouth - like periodontic disease can weaken bones, increase your risk of heart attacks / strokes. The bacteria can also travel to your lungs, creating respiratory disease. Gum infections gums release inflammatory substances causing brain inflammation, leading to neuronal (brain cell) death - causing dementia.

    You said "you need to catch life threatening conditions before they start."

    That's what dentists do.

  5. #35
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StanStill View Post
    I don't think that your findings are correct. After all, the days when barbers pulled teeth were the days when they did surgeries too. The red and white stripes of the pole represent blood and bandages, and surgeries are covered (provided they aren't cosmetic.) I think the main reason they get away with it is dental visits are something everyone needs to have regularly, they are somewhat expensive, and they've always gotten away with not covering them. It's why eye plans are like the Loch Ness Monster. I've heard people talk about them, but never seen one first hand. And of course at some point in most everyone's life they will need glasses or contacts, and they too are expensive.

    After all, it's a business not a democracy. You'll take what you're offered and you'll stop complaining!
    By the mid-1850s (which is also when the AMA was established), barbers were pretty much done with surgeries, and the medical profession was becoming more regulated, complete with licensing.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    So preventative medicine is not elective - but preventative dentistry is elective? There's no rhyme or reason to this. Diseases originating in the mouth - like periodontic disease can weaken bones, increase your risk of heart attacks / strokes. The bacteria can also travel to your lungs, creating respiratory disease. Gum infections gums release inflammatory substances causing brain inflammation, leading to neuronal (brain cell) death - causing dementia.

    You said "you need to catch life threatening conditions before they start."

    That's what dentists do.
    Mr. Djinn,

    That's what pliers are for.

  7. #37
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kallie Knoetze View Post
    Mr. Djinn, That's what pliers are for.
    Curing periodontic disease with a pair of pliers is not feasible. Do you have any real counter-argument, given that you conceded the importance of "catching life threatening conditions before they start."

  8. #38
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    Why not? What's the difference? Is an oncologist the same thing as a medical doctor? Is a podiatrist the same thing as a medical doctor?
    Dentists are doctors of their own specialty. They have DEA licensure and write for opioids, just like any other physician.

  9. #39
    Anarquistador StanStill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    By the mid-1850s (which is also when the AMA was established), barbers were pretty much done with surgeries, and the medical profession was becoming more regulated, complete with licensing.
    Not sure what that has to do with anything. Health insurance didn't come around until about 75 years later. Dentists were well established by that point.

  10. #40
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    Dentists are doctors of their own specialty. They have DEA licensure and write for opioids, just like any other physician.
    Sounds like a good reason to roll their practice into standard insurance policies.

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