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Thread: Should morbid obesity be a qualifier for Disability?

  1. #11
    Shut up and vote Addiction Solitaire Champion, Double Deuce Champion, Queen Jewels Champion, Ray Ray Shuffle Champion, Twins Champion, Blow Up: Arcade Champion, Bunch - Time Trial Champion, Znax Champion, Zoo Keeper Champion, Sobics School Champion, Swap a Smiley Champion, Makos Champion, Dino Drop Champion, Flower Frenzy Champion, Some Puzzle Champion, Funny Bubbles Champion, CubeZ Champion, Dinky Smash Champion, Fun Fun Animals Champion, Fruit Fabriek Champion, Raft Wars Champion, Rainbow Monkey RunDown Champion, Raft Wars Champion, Crime Puzzle Champion Blueneck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    It is interesting. Most obese people I know have some underlying reason for it, depression, food addiction, grief etc. So in those cases, I would say its likely part of a mental health issue. However, it becomes cloudy if we know that the 10 year old next door is morbidly obese because he eats sweets all day and plays video games non stop. Then is it the parents fault or his own? I hate fat shaming of any sort because even someone just 40 pounds overweight is acutely aware of it and the problems it plays. But either finding the time or money to lose the weight isnt always easy. Few rich people are morbidly obese and there is a reason for that.
    Well, we tobacco shame and addiction shame. But I don't think that's helpful in any case. What I was curious about was the fact that it's not aggressively treated and in cases of government benefits, it isn't until morbidity issues begin to appear that it's considered disabling. Which makes sense, but I also discovered that Obamacare covers a lot of medical treatment for obesity before those issues develop. My neighbor was obese and had a heart "incident" and that caused his insurance to kick in and paid for a lap band. He's lost probably 100 lbs. (my guesstimate) and because he was able to do that before he developed more severe problems, he's much healthier that he would have been if they had refused.

    My cousin is averse to almost any sort of help in the way of surgery or even anti-depressants or anti-anxiety medication, which because she stress eats, might help her. She won't even take opiates for pain. Which wouldn't bother me if she wasn't constantly complaining about how much pain she's in and manipulating all her friends and her son's caregivers (which is me, for one) to do all her housework, weed her garden, etc. I worry she's going to lose her mobility completely and wind up being one of those "my 600 lb. life" people stuck in a chair with everyone feeding her all day long. Her husband does everything for her, but now he's sick with what appears to be pneumonia and refuses to go to the hospital, which is ironic because he's an RN and a respiratory therapist for the county. He also has diabetes and Menierre's disease, although he's not obese himself.

    The whole damn family is a disaster waiting to happen and they have good insurance! I don't get that. And I don't get why any insurance company or even Medicaid to would wait till someone's health deteriorates to a point where they can't work at all before helping them deal with the underlying problem and instead just treat the symptoms and side effects. It doesn't seem cost effective.

    I sympathize more with people addicted to drugs because it's illegal and asking for treatment from your doctor can cause you to lose your job or DL or have your kids taken away if you don't comply with treatment. In some states they are required by law to contact the police. But if you're just obese and you cheat on your diet, there's no legal consequences.

    To me it's weird how people react to people's drug problems with great alarm, but someone eating themselves to death is allowed to do so with little interference from anyone.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by John T Ford View Post
    It's a little more complicated than that.
    Sometimes it is.

    Not in her case.

    And, she's not afraid to admit it.

    She loves food more than life.

  3. #13
    Junior Member Slartibartfast's Avatar
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    Maybe a pay-as-you-go society would help combat obesity. Services, where applicable, should charge $x.xx per lb of weight; to see a doctor, fly on a plane etc..

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DebateDrone View Post
    One condition exacerbates the other.

    It is not like her obesity causes conditions A, B and C any more than A,B, and C caused her obesity.

    Fixing her obesity may not fix her disabilities. I see a lot of skinny people at my cardiologist's office.
    True, but things like joint damage are permanent so even when you lose the weight that doesn't go away although it makes a great difference in how you feel. Same with heart issues. If you wait to lose weight until you have a heart attack, you damage your heart muscle and you can't get that back either.

    Even if obesity is just a contributing problem to conditions that were already there, it's one thing that can be treated to alleviate the damage, it makes sense to me that a physician would aim to stress weight loss for anyone showing signs of wear and tear that adds to health issues one may already have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slartibartfast View Post
    Maybe a pay-as-you-go society would help combat obesity. Services, where applicable, should charge $x.xx per lb of weight; to see a doctor, fly on a plane etc..
    Who does that benefit?

  6. #16
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueneck View Post
    Well, we tobacco shame and addiction shame. But I don't think that's helpful in any case. What I was curious about was the fact that it's not aggressively treated and in cases of government benefits, it isn't until morbidity issues begin to appear that it's considered disabling. Which makes sense, but I also discovered that Obamacare covers a lot of medical treatment for obesity before those issues develop. My neighbor was obese and had a heart "incident" and that caused his insurance to kick in and paid for a lap band. He's lost probably 100 lbs. (my guesstimate) and because he was able to do that before he developed more severe problems, he's much healthier that he would have been if they had refused.

    My cousin is averse to almost any sort of help in the way of surgery or even anti-depressants or anti-anxiety medication, which because she stress eats, might help her. She won't even take opiates for pain. Which wouldn't bother me if she wasn't constantly complaining about how much pain she's in and manipulating all her friends and her son's caregivers (which is me, for one) to do all her housework, weed her garden, etc. I worry she's going to lose her mobility completely and wind up being one of those "my 600 lb. life" people stuck in a chair with everyone feeding her all day long. Her husband does everything for her, but now he's sick with what appears to be pneumonia and refuses to go to the hospital, which is ironic because he's an RN and a respiratory therapist for the county. He also has diabetes and Menierre's disease, although he's not obese himself.

    The whole damn family is a disaster waiting to happen and they have good insurance! I don't get that. And I don't get why any insurance company or even Medicaid to would wait till someone's health deteriorates to a point where they can't work at all before helping them deal with the underlying problem and instead just treat the symptoms and side effects. It doesn't seem cost effective.

    I sympathize more with people addicted to drugs because it's illegal and asking for treatment from your doctor can cause you to lose your job or DL or have your kids taken away if you don't comply with treatment. In some states they are required by law to contact the police. But if you're just obese and you cheat on your diet, there's no legal consequences.

    To me it's weird how people react to people's drug problems with great alarm, but someone eating themselves to death is allowed to do so with little interference from anyone.
    It is a sort of odd disconnect isnt it? I found the same kind of thing with my brothers diabetes. While he wasnt obese, he had gained weight after turning 50 and sitting at a desk all day. Yet the medical community pushed drugs over everything else. He told them he wanted to try dieting first and then come back in 6 months or so to get re-checked. They pushed back and told him he must do the drugs as well. He refused and lost over 80 pounds and his sugar went back to normal. They almost seemed pissed. It was bizarre. If I didnt know better, I would have thought they wanted to trap him in the pill world where one Rx gives one symptoms so they need another pill. With his way they could only say "see you next year." As for insurance, lots of people are like that. Dentists are relatively cheap especially if one starts young and yet fewer people bother to go at all. Its just one of those things I guess. My spouse wont go to a doctor at all, he absolutely loathes going. I thought maybe it was a younger guy thing, but now that he is older, its worse.

    As for the weight thing, I sometimes wonder if the tough love thing might work in some cases. I know years ago my friends kid (12)was getting chubby and she refused to buy junk food and took his video games away. She made him go outside all the time. Told him over and over he would end up fat and sick. Seemed to work he is in his mid 20s now and loves to be outside and do athletic things.
    Thanks from Wonderer and Blueneck

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by John T Ford View Post
    Many people who have the surgery regain the weight over time.

    Because, this is more of a mental issue than physical.

    Like alcoholism ..... it's an addiction and must be treated as so.
    Both are needed, get the weight off, work on the mental aspects. Different results for different people.

  8. #18
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by THOR View Post
    Perhaps qualification for disability requires having the surgery to tie off the stomach. That often forces the weight reduction. Just handing out the money doesn't motivate anyone to do anything to remedy their problem. THe surgery would likely cost a fraction of what long term health issues will cost to treat.

    Alternatively, they could be required to gain even more weight, which would limit the amount of time for which they would remain a burden to society.

  9. #19
    Veteran Member Panzareta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Most people regain the weight back almost immediately. Underlying issues at play.

    https://www.healthline.com/health-ne...eriod-080515#2
    My SIL has kept her 100 +pounds off for the last sixteen years since her gastric bypass surgery. Plus her wildly fluctuating blood glucose levels which she had for years from her diabetes, stopped and settled within normal limits almost immediately.

    Except for a low dosage BP med she takes no other medications other than for pain. She reportedly continues with the occasional diarrhea and can only eat small meals at one time.
    Thanks from Wonderer and bajisima

  10. #20
    Flibbertigibbet Wonderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panzareta View Post
    My SIL has kept her 100 +pounds off for the last sixteen years since her gastric bypass surgery. Plus her wildly fluctuating blood glucose levels which she had for years from her diabetes, stopped and settled within normal limits almost immediately.

    Except for a low dosage BP med she takes no other medications other than for pain. She reportedly continues with the occasional diarrhea and can only eat small meals at one time.
    That's a good result!

    I have two family members who did the gastric balloon procedure -- without much luck. I don't monitor them closely but it didn't seem to change their eating habits much -- or if it did, it was only temporary.

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