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Thread: Should morbid obesity be a qualifier for Disability?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    It is interesting. Most obese people I know have some underlying reason for it, depression, food addiction, grief etc. So in those cases, I would say its likely part of a mental health issue. However, it becomes cloudy if we know that the 10 year old next door is morbidly obese because he eats sweets all day and plays video games non stop. Then is it the parents fault or his own? I hate fat shaming of any sort because even someone just 40 pounds overweight is acutely aware of it and the problems it plays. But either finding the time or money to lose the weight isnt always easy. Few rich people are morbidly obese and there is a reason for that.
    Once someone's weight becomes a life or death issue, you have to consider the practicality of addressing those issues with just diet, exercise and therapy. For example, one thing most people who've lost large amounts of weight and kept it off do is completely change how they view food - it's not for comfort or taste, it's just fuel. But that takes a while to be able to make a major lifestyle change and have it yield results.

    I don't think my cousin has that kind of time. I don't think she even has time to lose weight the normal way. She's in her early 60's and this arthritis problem has advanced aggressively over just the last few years. She can't exercise at all either. I worry she might be at a point where it's surgery or disability...or death.

    I thought the doctor jumping down her throat would wake her up, but so far she hasn't made any major changes and doesn't seem to have a sense of urgency about it.
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    It is a sort of odd disconnect isnt it? I found the same kind of thing with my brothers diabetes. While he wasnt obese, he had gained weight after turning 50 and sitting at a desk all day. Yet the medical community pushed drugs over everything else. He told them he wanted to try dieting first and then come back in 6 months or so to get re-checked. They pushed back and told him he must do the drugs as well. He refused and lost over 80 pounds and his sugar went back to normal. They almost seemed pissed. It was bizarre. If I didnt know better, I would have thought they wanted to trap him in the pill world where one Rx gives one symptoms so they need another pill. With his way they could only say "see you next year." As for insurance, lots of people are like that. Dentists are relatively cheap especially if one starts young and yet fewer people bother to go at all. Its just one of those things I guess. My spouse wont go to a doctor at all, he absolutely loathes going. I thought maybe it was a younger guy thing, but now that he is older, its worse.

    As for the weight thing, I sometimes wonder if the tough love thing might work in some cases. I know years ago my friends kid (12)was getting chubby and she refused to buy junk food and took his video games away. She made him go outside all the time. Told him over and over he would end up fat and sick. Seemed to work he is in his mid 20s now and loves to be outside and do athletic things.
    LOL at the dentist thing, if you watch television enough, you would think Americans are obsessed with their teeth. Every other commercial is for some sort of dental product. Whiteners, rinses, toothbrushes and then those invisible braces and dental implants. And everyone on television has perfect teeth that are so white it's ridiculous.

    But untreated dental issues can lead to heart damage too. Although the cosmetic aspect seems to be where the money is if you judge it by the advertising.

    It's sad when you see young people who are overweight. That's pretty common around here and usually when you see it, the parents are obese also. Whole families in Walmart with a cart full of Twinkies and frozen pizzas. I actually think poverty (combined with no nutritional education) compounds that. People think if they get a $5 dollar pizza they are saving money even though they end up getting two or three to feed their family.

    To eat healthy it requires a large output up front, meal planning and cooking and food storage ability. But most people think if they just buy a pot pie for a dollar, that's a meal, but it really isn't. I have a serious aversion to onions, so I wind up making my own frozen meals in small containers and they're really healthy. It's a lot of work and expense to make say, a casserole with brown rice, black beans, spinach and ham, but it ends up being very filling and a 9X13 baking dish makes enough for 8 lunches or something like that. But it's messy and time consuming and can see why someone with kids wouldn't have the time or energy to do that.
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  3. #23
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueneck View Post
    Once someone's weight becomes a life or death issue, you have to consider the practicality of addressing those issues with just diet, exercise and therapy. For example, one thing most people who've lost large amounts of weight and kept it off do is completely change how they view food - it's not for comfort or taste, it's just fuel. But that takes a while to be able to make a major lifestyle change and have it yield results.

    I don't think my cousin has that kind of time. I don't think she even has time to lose weight the normal way. She's in her early 60's and this arthritis problem has advanced aggressively over just the last few years. She can't exercise at all either. I worry she might be at a point where it's surgery or disability...or death.

    I thought the doctor jumping down her throat would wake her up, but so far she hasn't made any major changes and doesn't seem to have a sense of urgency about it.
    I am not sure if disability benefits will prolong her life...but weight loss surgery would. Quality of life is important at any age and hers will decline year by year. Weight loss surgery is not a bad as it used to be, there are many options and different types. Even tho, studies are now coming out that some patients are gaining the weight back, but many don't and if they learn to eat properly, then the odds are good that she won't gain the weight back. I sounds like your cousin has depression and rightfully so because her quality of life is so poor at this point. If she has the surgery, it is not unusual to lose a 100 pounds in one year. She will feel like a new person after that.

    It is hard to qualify for disability in Ohio, but in Tenn, one of my Dad's friends kid was able to receive it for obesity. He was 24 when he had the surgery. He was 5'7 and between 400 to 500 pounds. He could not even lay down to sleep because of the abdominal weight pressing against his lungs. He slept on his knees face down on the couch. He did not take the surgery seriously and only lost 70 pounds because he learned to work around the small stomach..he had a gastric bypass. Instead of eating two double Whoopers at one sitting, he would still eat two Whopper but it would take him all day to eat them.

    I also worked with a instructor a few years back and she was over 500 pounds. She ended up losing circulation in her legs and developed huge sores on her legs and was admitted into a nursing home to lose weight. She was in there for a long time and lost some weight because they put her on a liquid diet. She ended up dying at 49 years old from a heart attack.

    I would push the surgery...hard.
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  4. #24
    Junior Member Slartibartfast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueneck View Post
    Who does that benefit?
    The obese, and in the UK, the taxpayer that funds the NHS.
    Last edited by Slartibartfast; 27th June 2018 at 01:06 AM.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    I am not sure if disability benefits will prolong her life...but weight loss surgery would. Quality of life is important at any age and hers will decline year by year. Weight loss surgery is not a bad as it used to be, there are many options and different types. Even tho, studies are now coming out that some patients are gaining the weight back, but many don't and if they learn to eat properly, then the odds are good that she won't gain the weight back. I sounds like your cousin has depression and rightfully so because her quality of life is so poor at this point. If she has the surgery, it is not unusual to lose a 100 pounds in one year. She will feel like a new person after that.

    It is hard to qualify for disability in Ohio, but in Tenn, one of my Dad's friends kid was able to receive it for obesity. He was 24 when he had the surgery. He was 5'7 and between 400 to 500 pounds. He could not even lay down to sleep because of the abdominal weight pressing against his lungs. He slept on his knees face down on the couch. He did not take the surgery seriously and only lost 70 pounds because he learned to work around the small stomach..he had a gastric bypass. Instead of eating two double Whoopers at one sitting, he would still eat two Whopper but it would take him all day to eat them.

    I also worked with a instructor a few years back and she was over 500 pounds. She ended up losing circulation in her legs and developed huge sores on her legs and was admitted into a nursing home to lose weight. She was in there for a long time and lost some weight because they put her on a liquid diet. She ended up dying at 49 years old from a heart attack.

    I would push the surgery...hard.

    At the moment, it is still in the animal trials stage, but there is a new drug that has the potential to replace gastric bypass surgery: https://www.docwirenews.com/docwire-...astric-bypass/
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  6. #26
    Veteran Member Puzzling Evidence's Avatar
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    You know, you guys dont have to actually quote an entire five page quote if you want to comment. Some of us are posting on our cell phone.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueneck View Post
    I have a cousin who is struggling with obesity. Big time. It's wrecking her joints (every pound of excess weight adds four pounds of stress to your joints), she's borderline diabetic, has high blood pressure and there is a history heart problems on both her parents side of her family. Her brother died suddenly in his mid 40's when his enlarged heart (which he didn't know he had) exploded. He was overweight, but not what I would call obese.

    She's about 5'4" and easily over 300 pounds, although I've never asked because she's very sensitive about it. She struggles to walk and runs out of breath with very little effort. She told me her BMI is very high, too. I asked her if she's considered a lap band and surprisingly, she didn't even know what that was until I mentioned surgery, which she quickly replied "NO. No surgery."

    Her doctor finally laid down the law to her over the issues with her joints and told her her problem is her weight. For 6 years she's been in denial about this, blaming her job for having to be on her feet too much, an "exploded tendon" in her foot and then finally arthritis, but she's never seemed to embrace the idea that her weight is causing this. The doctor wrote her an order for a walker and she spent $5,000 on a Jacuzzi tub which after installed, she couldn't even fit in (it's 32") so she has upgraded to a bigger one which hasn't been installed yet, but it will cost even more money. She insists she can lose the weight with the proper diet, which I am sure is true, but I don't think at her point will power alone will be enough and the longer it takes I feel the damage to her joints will continue and be permanent and she might not be able to walk in another year.

    So she is retired, but I see a lot of younger people at Walmart who are morbidly obese and I started wondering if this qualifies as a disability for the purpose of getting benefits.

    I think of morbid obesity in much the same way as addiction, smoking or alcoholism, but I don't think being a drug addict qualifies you for benefits unless you have done serious damage to your body that renders you unable to work. From what I've read, it's the same way with obesity, once you develop morbidity issues, those can qualify you for benefits.

    Anyone have any thoughts on this? Should doctors have to insure a morbidly obese patient is taking adequate measures to insure someone is adhering to a weight loss program if they're going to classify the patient as disabled?
    Should treatable and curable conditions be a qualifier for permanent disability? No. Eating disorder treatment should be covered in lieu of disability. In some cases surgery.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    I am not sure if disability benefits will prolong her life...but weight loss surgery would. Quality of life is important at any age and hers will decline year by year. Weight loss surgery is not a bad as it used to be, there are many options and different types. Even tho, studies are now coming out that some patients are gaining the weight back, but many don't and if they learn to eat properly, then the odds are good that she won't gain the weight back. I sounds like your cousin has depression and rightfully so because her quality of life is so poor at this point. If she has the surgery, it is not unusual to lose a 100 pounds in one year. She will feel like a new person after that.

    It is hard to qualify for disability in Ohio, but in Tenn, one of my Dad's friends kid was able to receive it for obesity. He was 24 when he had the surgery. He was 5'7 and between 400 to 500 pounds. He could not even lay down to sleep because of the abdominal weight pressing against his lungs. He slept on his knees face down on the couch. He did not take the surgery seriously and only lost 70 pounds because he learned to work around the small stomach..he had a gastric bypass. Instead of eating two double Whoopers at one sitting, he would still eat two Whopper but it would take him all day to eat them.

    I also worked with a instructor a few years back and she was over 500 pounds. She ended up losing circulation in her legs and developed huge sores on her legs and was admitted into a nursing home to lose weight. She was in there for a long time and lost some weight because they put her on a liquid diet. She ended up dying at 49 years old from a heart attack.

    I would push the surgery...hard.
    I wish I could do that, but she doesn't value my opinion very much and I work as a caregiver for her son and doesn't hesitate to play the boss card if I disagree with her about anything.

    I'm going over there and spending the night because her husband was hospitalized with extremely high white blood cell count, sugar up over 500 and she can't get up in the night with her son if he has a seizure.

    I might wind up getting paid, but it's not for sure.

    The thing is it's someone's own business how they take care of their health, but the consequences of not taking care of it do fall on other people. I just spent six months with my sister in the hospital in part because she was an alcoholic for 20 years and now I've got another person in my life who's health is going to put me in a position I don't want to be in.

    All self inflicted and neither one of them are willing to listen to anybody until they're at a point where they have no choice.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neomalthusian View Post
    Should treatable and curable conditions be a qualifier for permanent disability? No. Eating disorder treatment should be covered in lieu of disability. In some cases surgery.
    Thing is by the time people with eating disorders seek medical help, they've already cause irreparable damage to their bodies. It's annoying when you think of the diet industry soaking people for endless amounts of money that would be better spent on real solutions. I can't tell you how much this woman has spent on Herbalife, "It Works" (it doesn't), Deal a Meal, Nutri-System, and so on. And now the $5,000 bathtub.

    She could've gotten several surgeries for what she's spent on all that crap.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miller47 View Post
    Sometimes it is.

    Not in her case.

    And, she's not afraid to admit it.

    She loves food more than life.
    Either that or it's a more convenient excuse than digging into the problem. If she says she loves food too much it saves face because she doesn't have to admit she wants to change but it's a struggle that she's losing. A lot of people will make up a lie to cover for what they see as a failure.
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