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Thread: Should morbid obesity be a qualifier for Disability?

  1. #31
    Flibbertigibbet Wonderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueneck View Post
    I wish I could do that, but she doesn't value my opinion very much and I work as a caregiver for her son and doesn't hesitate to play the boss card if I disagree with her about anything.

    I'm going over there and spending the night because her husband was hospitalized with extremely high white blood cell count, sugar up over 500 and she can't get up in the night with her son if he has a seizure.

    I might wind up getting paid, but it's not for sure.

    The thing is it's someone's own business how they take care of their health, but the consequences of not taking care of it do fall on other people. I just spent six months with my sister in the hospital in part because she was an alcoholic for 20 years and now I've got another person in my life who's health is going to put me in a position I don't want to be in.

    All self inflicted and neither one of them are willing to listen to anybody until they're at a point where they have no choice.
    That stinks. I'm sorry, Blue.
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueneck View Post
    Thing is by the time people with eating disorders seek medical help, they've already cause irreparable damage to their bodies.
    Yeah sometimes. But major transformations are very possible for most.

    It's annoying when you think of the diet industry soaking people for endless amounts of money that would be better spent on real solutions. I can't tell you how much this woman has spent on Herbalife, "It Works" (it doesn't), Deal a Meal, Nutri-System, and so on. And now the $5,000 bathtub.

    She could've gotten several surgeries for what she's spent on all that crap.
    A surgery should be a last resort, but it's really not that expensive relative to the benefits for the morbidly obese.

    It will frustrate people to think part of their premium or taxes pays for treatments for things people often see as a willpower or laziness problem. It's really easy and tempting to think the person can just decide to behave differently and fix their own problem. And sometimes they can. Other times it just doesn't happen on one's own. Help should be available, but the professional health and mental health community have a responsibility to actively steer people toward treatments that legit research and clinical trials have shown is effective, and away from things that doesn't have research behind it attesting to its effectiveness.
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  3. #33
    ~Standing My Ground~ Sassy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueneck View Post
    I wish I could do that, but she doesn't value my opinion very much and I work as a caregiver for her son and doesn't hesitate to play the boss card if I disagree with her about anything.

    I'm going over there and spending the night because her husband was hospitalized with extremely high white blood cell count, sugar up over 500 and she can't get up in the night with her son if he has a seizure.

    I might wind up getting paid, but it's not for sure.

    The thing is it's someone's own business how they take care of their health, but the consequences of not taking care of it do fall on other people. I just spent six months with my sister in the hospital in part because she was an alcoholic for 20 years and now I've got another person in my life who's health is going to put me in a position I don't want to be in.

    All self inflicted and neither one of them are willing to listen to anybody until they're at a point where they have no choice.
    There is no point in pushing surgery. In fact I work to talk everyone that I can out of surgery. Even people who really, really want to lose weight find it very hard to stick to the minisclue portions one can eat afterward. Have you looked at that? Like a couple tablespoons of food at a time.

    Drs. require that a person lose 'x' amount of weight on their own first for a reason. If the person is not committed, it won't work. It doesn't force anything.

    My sister was committed at first and for a long time. Eating her little tablespoons of food, until she went through a bad emotional time and then got right back to where she was.

  4. #34
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sassy View Post
    There is no point in pushing surgery. In fact I work to talk everyone that I can out of surgery. Even people who really, really want to lose weight find it very hard to stick to the minisclue portions one can eat afterward. Have you looked at that? Like a couple tablespoons of food at a time.

    Drs. require that a person lose 'x' amount of weight on their own first for a reason. If the person is not committed, it won't work. It doesn't force anything.

    My sister was committed at first and for a long time. Eating her little tablespoons of food, until she went through a bad emotional time and then got right back to where she was.
    My hospital performs a lot of weight loss surgery...it is the majority of patients who make up our census. It depends on what is going on with the patient as far as determining surgery. If a patient is not ambulatory or has conditions that cause them to be sedentary, we will do the surgery without asking them to diet and lose weight first. Some people will gain the weight back and some will keep the weight off. Stress eating is something that should be identified and addressed by the patient during the process. It is not the fault of the surgery...it is the patient.
    Last edited by HCProf; 26th June 2018 at 11:12 PM.
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  5. #35
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueneck View Post
    I wish I could do that, but she doesn't value my opinion very much and I work as a caregiver for her son and doesn't hesitate to play the boss card if I disagree with her about anything.

    I'm going over there and spending the night because her husband was hospitalized with extremely high white blood cell count, sugar up over 500 and she can't get up in the night with her son if he has a seizure.

    I might wind up getting paid, but it's not for sure.

    The thing is it's someone's own business how they take care of their health, but the consequences of not taking care of it do fall on other people. I just spent six months with my sister in the hospital in part because she was an alcoholic for 20 years and now I've got another person in my life who's health is going to put me in a position I don't want to be in.

    All self inflicted and neither one of them are willing to listen to anybody until they're at a point where they have no choice.
    Caregivers are often sucked into a vortex when it comes to family and a lot of times, friends. It is because you are professionals and know how to care for a person correctly. For example, how to lift or move a patient without injury. I do get your point tho...it is hard to maintain empathy when a person does nothing to help themselves. I think you need to be paid for this extra service, it is only fair. I would have a chat with the son about compensation for his mother if you want to care for her...it is a hard job and you are trustworthy. It is worth it.
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  6. #36
    ~Standing My Ground~ Sassy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    My hospital performs a lot of weight loss surgery...it is the majority of patients who make up our census. It depends on what is going on with the patient as far as determining surgery. If a patient is not ambulatory or has conditions that cause them to be sedentary, we will do the surgery without asking them to diet and lose weight first. Some people will gain the weight back and some will keep the weight off. Stress eating is something that should be identified and addressed by the patient during the process. It is not the fault of the surgery...it is the patient.
    Right, so why would it be advisable to talk someone into surgery like it's a magic fix, if they are clearly not ready to face that and address it?

  7. #37
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sassy View Post
    Right, so why would it be advisable to talk someone into surgery like it's a magic fix, if they are clearly not ready to face that and address it?
    In the case of the OP...there are other conditions that will prevent successful weight loss...such as her arthritis. IMO, her age is working against her and she needs to get the weight off her body and joints so she can exercise. Otherwise, she will end up in a wheelchair completely. Over 60, you can tank fast. The counseling prior, during and after the surgery includes a exercise program because you cannot successfully lose weight or maintain weight without it. If you have arthritis or joint pain from excess weight, you can't exercise. If a patient is 30, without mobility issues, it is a different approach. Older people are stubborn and coaching for wellness is often a challenge. Nothing is guaranteed but perhaps a chance to change their attitude.
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  8. #38
    Praguematic Helena's Avatar
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    Jesus, Blue, that sounds like a terrible situation all around. Big, big respect for dealing with irrational people, which must be a hundred times more difficult when you're emotionally involved, and how could you not be when it's your family. And I would say working for relatives must bring some issues even if they are perfectly reasonable, which is clearly not the case here. You're a hero for even trying to improve the situation and they should be very grateful to you (on edit: in addition to paying you for your work, of course). *hug*
    Last edited by Helena; 27th June 2018 at 12:33 AM.

  9. #39
    Junior Member Slartibartfast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    I am not sure if disability benefits will prolong her life...but weight loss surgery would. Quality of life is important at any age and hers will decline year by year. Weight loss surgery is not a bad as it used to be, there are many options and different types. Even tho, studies are now coming out that some patients are gaining the weight back, but many don't and if they learn to eat properly, then the odds are good that she won't gain the weight back. I sounds like your cousin has depression and rightfully so because her quality of life is so poor at this point. If she has the surgery, it is not unusual to lose a 100 pounds in one year. She will feel like a new person after that.

    It is hard to qualify for disability in Ohio, but in Tenn, one of my Dad's friends kid was able to receive it for obesity. He was 24 when he had the surgery. He was 5'7 and between 400 to 500 pounds. He could not even lay down to sleep because of the abdominal weight pressing against his lungs. He slept on his knees face down on the couch. He did not take the surgery seriously and only lost 70 pounds because he learned to work around the small stomach..he had a gastric bypass. Instead of eating two double Whoopers at one sitting, he would still eat two Whopper but it would take him all day to eat them.

    I also worked with a instructor a few years back and she was over 500 pounds. She ended up losing circulation in her legs and developed huge sores on her legs and was admitted into a nursing home to lose weight. She was in there for a long time and lost some weight because they put her on a liquid diet. She ended up dying at 49 years old from a heart attack.

    I would push the surgery...hard.
    Lock them in a room for 6 months with a bathroom and a serving hatch.

    Feed them 2 salads a day and water for drinks.

  10. #40
    Veteran Member Pragmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueneck View Post
    I have a cousin who is struggling with obesity. Big time. It's wrecking her joints (every pound of excess weight adds four pounds of stress to your joints), she's borderline diabetic, has high blood pressure and there is a history heart problems on both her parents side of her family. Her brother died suddenly in his mid 40's when his enlarged heart (which he didn't know he had) exploded. He was overweight, but not what I would call obese.

    She's about 5'4" and easily over 300 pounds, although I've never asked because she's very sensitive about it. She struggles to walk and runs out of breath with very little effort. She told me her BMI is very high, too. I asked her if she's considered a lap band and surprisingly, she didn't even know what that was until I mentioned surgery, which she quickly replied "NO. No surgery."

    Her doctor finally laid down the law to her over the issues with her joints and told her her problem is her weight. For 6 years she's been in denial about this, blaming her job for having to be on her feet too much, an "exploded tendon" in her foot and then finally arthritis, but she's never seemed to embrace the idea that her weight is causing this. The doctor wrote her an order for a walker and she spent $5,000 on a Jacuzzi tub which after installed, she couldn't even fit in (it's 32") so she has upgraded to a bigger one which hasn't been installed yet, but it will cost even more money. She insists she can lose the weight with the proper diet, which I am sure is true, but I don't think at her point will power alone will be enough and the longer it takes I feel the damage to her joints will continue and be permanent and she might not be able to walk in another year.

    So she is retired, but I see a lot of younger people at Walmart who are morbidly obese and I started wondering if this qualifies as a disability for the purpose of getting benefits.

    I think of morbid obesity in much the same way as addiction, smoking or alcoholism, but I don't think being a drug addict qualifies you for benefits unless you have done serious damage to your body that renders you unable to work. From what I've read, it's the same way with obesity, once you develop morbidity issues, those can qualify you for benefits.

    Anyone have any thoughts on this? Should doctors have to insure a morbidly obese patient is taking adequate measures to insure someone is adhering to a weight loss program if they're going to classify the patient as disabled?
    Sounds disabled to me.

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