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Thread: Dr. Fuhrman's Immunity Solution - Prevent cancer, cure disease, and lose weight.

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    Dr. Fuhrman's Immunity Solution - Prevent cancer, cure disease, and lose weight.

    Dr. Fuhrman is a board certified physician with over 20 years experience in consulting patients using his nutritional methods.

    He's pieced together all the scientific studies to produce an easy to follow diet plan that can literally save your life.

    If anyone is interested in eating great food, curing diseases (such as diabetes, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases), preventing cancer, and/or losing weight, Dr. Fuhrman's Immunity Solution is a must watch:

    Dr. Fuhrman on Public Television - Dr. Fuhrman's Immunity Solution! and 3 Steps to Incredible Health | DrFuhrman.com

    Unfortunately the science and evidence behind it is not something easily summarized, but here is what the diet focuses on (taken from his website):

    G-BOM*BS: Greens, Beans, Onions, Mushrooms*, Berries, and Seeds

    “G-BOM*BS” is an acronym you can use to remember the most nutrient-dense, health-promoting foods on the planet. These are the foods you should eat every day, and they should make up a significant proportion of your diet — these foods are extremely effective at preventing chronic disease and promoting health and longevity.

    G — Greens
    Raw leafy greens contain only about 100 calories per pound, and are packed with nutrients. Leafy greens contain substances that protect blood vessels, and are associated with reduced risk of diabetes.1 Greens are an excellent tool for weight loss, since they can be consumed in virtually unlimited quantities. Leafy greens are also the most nutrient-dense of all foods, but unfortunately are only consumed in miniscule amounts in a typical American diet. We should follow the example of our closest living relatives — chimpanzees and gorillas — who consume tens of pounds of green leaves every day. The majority of calories in green vegetables, including leafy greens, come from protein, and this plant protein is packaged with beneficial phytochemicals: Green vegetables are rich in folate (the natural form of folic acid), calcium, and contain small amounts of omega-3 fatty acids. Leafy greens are also rich in antioxidant pigments called carotenoids, specifically lutein and zeaxanthin, which are the carotenoids known to promote healthy vision.2 Also, several leafy greens and other green vegetables (such as bok choy, broccoli, and kale) belong to the cruciferous family of vegetables.

    All vegetables contain protective micronutrients and phytochemicals, but cruciferous vegetables have a unique chemical composition — they contain glucosinolates, and when their cell walls are broken by blending, chopping, or chewing, a chemical reaction converts glucosinolates to isothiocyanates (ITCs) — compounds with a variety of potent anti-cancer effects. Because different ITCs can work in different locations in the cell and on different molecules, they can have combined additive effects, working synergistically to remove carcinogens, reduce inflammation, neutralize oxidative stress, inhibit angiogenesis (the process by which tumors acquire a blood supply), and kill cancer cells.3

    B - Beans
    Beans (and other legumes as well) are a powerhouse of superior nutrition, and the most nutrient-dense carbohydrate source. They act as an anti-diabetes and weight-loss food because they are digested slowly, having a stabilizing effect on blood sugar, which promotes satiety and helps to prevent food cravings. Plus they contain soluble fiber, which lowers cholesterol levels.14 Beans are unique foods because of their very high levels of fiber and resistant starch, carbohydrates that are not broken down by digestive enzymes. Fiber and resistant starch not only reduce total the number of calories absorbed from beans, but are also fermented by intestinal bacteria into fatty acids that help to prevent colon cancer.15 Eating beans, peas, or lentils at least twice a week has been found to decrease colon cancer risk by 50%.16 Legume intake also provides significant protection against oral, larynx, pharynx, stomach, and kidney cancers.17

    O — Onions
    Onions, along with leeks, garlic, shallots, and scallions, make up the Allium family of vegetables, which have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and immune systems, as well as anti-diabetic and anti-cancer effects. Allium vegetables are known for their characteristic organosulfur compounds, Similar to the ITCs in cruciferous vegetables, organosulfur compounds are released when onions are chopped, crushed, or chewed. Epidemiological studies have found that increased consumption of Allium vegetables is associated with lower risk of gastric and prostate cancers. These compounds prevent the development of cancers by detoxifying carcinogens, halting cancer cell growth, and blocking angiogenesis.4 Onions also contain high concentrations of health-promoting flavonoid antioxidants, predominantly quercetin, and red onions also contain at least 25 different anthocyanins.5,6 Quercetin slows tumor development, suppresses growth and proliferation and induces cell death in colon cancer cells7. Flavonoids also have anti-inflammatory effects that may contribute to cancer prevention.8

    M - Mushrooms*
    Consuming mushrooms regularly is associated with decreased risk of breast, stomach, and colorectal cancers. In one recent Chinese study, women who ate at least 10 grams of fresh mushrooms each day (about one mushroom per day) had a 64% decreased risk of breast cancer. Even more dramatic protection was gained by women who ate 10 grams of mushrooms and drank green tea daily — an 89% decrease in risk for premenopausal women, and 82% for postmenopausal women.9,10 White, cremini, Portobello, oyster, shiitake, maitake, and reishi mushrooms all have anti-cancer properties — some are anti-inflammatory, stimulate the immune system, prevent DNA damage, slow cancer cell growth, cause programmed cancer cell death, and inhibit angiogenesis. In addition to these properties, mushrooms are unique in that they contain aromatase inhibitors — compounds that can block the production of estrogen. These compounds are thought to be largely responsible for the preventive effects of mushrooms against breast cancer — in fact, there are aromatase-inhibiting drugs on the market that are used to treat breast cancer. Regular consumption of dietary aromatase inhibitors is an excellent strategy for prevention, and it turns out that even the most commonly eaten mushrooms (white, cremini, and Portobello) have a high anti-aromatase activity.11

    B — Berries
    Blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries are true super foods. Naturally sweet and juicy, berries are low in sugar and high in nutrients — they are among the best foods you can eat. Their vibrant colors mean that they are full of antioxidants, including flavonoids and antioxidant vitamins — berries are some of the highest antioxidant foods in existence. Berries— plentiful antioxidant content confers both cardioprotective and anti-cancer effects, such as reducing blood pressure, reducing inflammation, preventing DNA damage, inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, and stimulating of the body’s own antioxidant enzymes. Berry consumption has been linked to reduced risk of diabetes, cancers and cognitive decline.12 Berries are an excellent food for the brain — berry consumption improves both motor coordination and memory.13

    S - Seeds
    Nuts and seeds contain healthy fats and are rich in a spectrum of micronutrients including phytosterols, minerals, and antioxidants. Countless studies have demonstrated the cardiovascular benefits of nuts, and including nuts in the diet aids in weight maintenance and diabetes prevention.18-19 The nutritional profiles of seeds are similar to nuts when it comes to healthy fats, minerals, and antioxidants, but seeds are also abundant in trace minerals, higher in protein than nuts, and each kind of seed is nutritionally unique. Flax, chia, and hemp seeds are extremely rich sources of omega-3 fats. In addition to the omega-3s, flaxseeds are rich in fiber and lignans. Flaxseed consumption protects against heart disease by a number of different mechanisms, and lignans, which are present in both flaxseeds and sesame seeds, have anti-cancer effects.20 Sunflower seeds are especially rich in protein and minerals. Pumpkin seeds are rich in iron and calcium and are a good source of zinc. Sesame seeds have the greatest amount of calcium of any food in the world, and provide abundant amounts of vitamin E. Also, black sesame seeds are extremely rich in antioxidants. The healthy fats in seeds and nuts also aid in the absorption of nutrients when eaten with vegetables.

    *Only eat cooked mushrooms as raw mushrooms contain mild carcinogens.
    http://www.drfuhrman.com/library/gombbs.aspx

    In the meantime, have a look here for some important scientific studies and good to know information: The War Has Only Vegan!: Health
    Last edited by Boycott Factory Farms; 3rd September 2012 at 04:07 PM.

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    And I just found his speech '3 Steps To Incredible Health' on youtube:

    There are four parts to this you can find on youtube, but I could only post one video.

    I do personally like his Immunity Solution show best - it was better rehearsed I think. This one still has good information though.
    Last edited by Boycott Factory Farms; 3rd September 2012 at 04:23 PM.

  3. #3
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    The good doc ain't making enough with his spiel to pay for advertising????

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenridgeman View Post
    The good doc ain't making enough with his spiel to pay for advertising????
    Huh? He doesn't really need to advertise.

  5. #5
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    The Case for the Bean

    Owing to their nitrogen content (i.e. protein), legumes are often recommended as a healthy dietary choice, especially for vegetarians. Proponents of legumes cite their dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals, and “high” protein content, and may even reference observational studies that “show” that legumes are healthy. Let’s address the potential benefits of legumes one by one.

    First, you might already know that foods other than beans – such as ample amounts of vegetables and fruit – offer us plenty of fiber. In addition, dietary fiber isn’t as important as you might think, in the context of a healthy diet that is not promoting gut damage. In summary, eating legumes for fiber is like eating a Mounds bar for the coconut – lots of potential down sides (which we discuss in detail below) for a small potential benefit.

    In terms of micronutrient density, legumes come up short when compared to vegetables and fruit. (The lack of nutrient density in beans compared to green leafy vegetables like kale is so glaring that we can rest our “beans are nutritious” case here.)

    Finally, we don’t think we need to make a lengthy argument that legumes are an inferior source of protein compared to meat, seafood, and eggs, and that regularly consuming animal protein is your best bet to supply dietary protein (i.e. those amino acids that your body builds into your structural “stuff”). Just in case… legumes offer an incomplete amino acid profile, meaning that they do not supply all essential amino acids in biologically useful amounts. In addition, some of the proteins that are technically present in the legumes are poorly digestible, and thus not available for use in your body.

    Digging Deeper – The Legume Downside

    So legumes aren’t as awesome as the marketing might make you think. Is that really a good enough reason to ditch them altogether? Worse than simply being an inferior source of dietary protein and an unnecessary duplication of the dietary fiber supplied by the micronutrient-dense vegetables and fruit we recommend, legumes do have some major downsides – enough that we think you should keep them off your plate.

    First, while legumes do contain some protein, they also contain significant amounts of carbohydrate – often several times that of the amount of useable protein. We are certainly not carb-o-phobic, but the amount of carbohydrate you’d take in using legumes as a primary protein source would mean that you were (a) not getting enough (bioavailable) protein in an attempt to limit your carbohydrate intake to a healthy amount, or (b) taking in unhealthfully high amounts of carbohydrate to get as much protein as you need. (Or, potentially, both.) And though the carbs found in beans are low glycemic index, your body still has to secrete significant amounts of insulin to manage the relatively large amounts of blood sugar – and with insulin, like many things in your body, a little is good, but lots is… not.

    Second, legumes as a general botanical category are toxic if consumed raw. Literally… toxic. The problem is that usual preparation methods of prolonged soaking and rinsing, cooking, sprouting, or fermenting only partially neutralizes those toxic substances, generally referred to as lectins. (There are other harmful substances in legumes, but we’ll stick with lectins for now.) Lectins are plant proteins that are very resistant to digestion in the stomach and small intestine. They arrive (and hang out) in the small intestine largely intact, and do some pretty dirty work there. Lectins such as phytohaemagglutinin create damage to the wall of the small intestine (which increases gut permeability) and causes an imbalance of gut bacteria. P.S. Increased gut permeability is never a good thing.

    If your gut integrity is compromised, that means that the immune tissue located in your gut is exposed to large amounts of potentially inflammatory substances, including those lectins. Regular exposure to lectins can promote inflammation in the digestive tract, but also elsewhere in the body (since those little buggers punched holes in your gut and can get virtually everywhere via your bloodstream). Long story short: the fewer intact foreign proteins (including lectins) circulating in your bloodstream, the better. Foreign proteins in your bloodstream cause systemic inflammation. Boooo.

    Specific to Soy

    A third concern, specific to soybeans and even moreso with processed soy products, is the content of compounds that behave like estrogen (that female sex hormone) in the human body. These compounds, classified as phytoestrogens (or “isoflavones”), bind to and stimulate – or, in some tissues, block – estrogen receptors. And while the overall research on soy products is conflicting and inclusive due to the gender-and tissue-specific effects of phytoestrogens, there are, in our view, some alarming issues related to the consumption of soy and soy products. In women, phytoestrogens have been linked to longer and more painful menstrual periods. For guys, soy intake decreases sperm count. And studies suggest that children fed soy-based formulas may be at risk for compromised immune systems later in life. So while the research may not be cut and dried, we think you shouldn’t mess with your delicate sex hormone balance at any age, and ingesting phytoestrogens in an unknown “dose” via soy products do just that.

    As an aside, edamame (the unprocessed soybean) is not your best choice for everyday consumption, but processed soy products, including soy protein concentrate/isolate and “texturized vegetable protein”, are extra-bad choices for multiple reasons. In fact, the more processed forms of soybeans, like tofu, are an even more dense source of the phytoestrogens and other antinutrients than their unprocessed counterparts.

    For Vegetarians

    For vegetarians who are morally or ethically opposed to using animal proteins for their amino acid supply, legumes might be a “necessary evil”, since legumes – specifically soy – are some of the densest plant source of protein. However, understand that from our view, legumes won’t come anywhere close to supplying the right amount and proportion of amino acids for optimal health. (The argument is often made that some groups of people survive while eating legumes, but that doesn’t mean that legumes are your best choice to thrive.) If you’re a strict vegan, your best bet is to practice traditional preparation methods of soaking, rinsing, sprouting, fermenting and prolonged cooking, to partially break down some of those inflammatory lectins, and to rely on more dense sources of protein (less processed soy products like tofu and tempeh) that offer more grams of protein without so many accompanying carbohydrates.

    The Wrap-Up

    In summary, the claimed benefits of legumes aren’t quite what they’re heralded to be, and there are significant downsides to legume consumption. Yes, there are ways to make them “less bad”, but why work so hard to continue to eat things that in the end still aren’t that healthy? While prolonged soaking, rinsing, cooking and fermenting legumes neutralizes some of the lectins, we still don’t think that they offer enough in terms of micronutrition (vitamins, minerals, and beneficial phytochemicals) to justify regular consumption. And while the jury may be out on the long-term effects of phytoestrogens, we recommend generally avoiding legumes as part of your healthy, Eat-Good-Food diet.
    The Legume Manifesto | Whole9 | Let us change your life.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparta View Post
    The Case for the Bean

    Owing to their nitrogen content (i.e. protein), legumes are often recommended as a healthy dietary choice, especially for vegetarians. Proponents of legumes cite their dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals, and “high” protein content, and may even reference observational studies that “show” that legumes are healthy. Let’s address the potential benefits of legumes one by one.

    First, you might already know that foods other than beans – such as ample amounts of vegetables and fruit – offer us plenty of fiber. In addition, dietary fiber isn’t as important as you might think, in the context of a healthy diet that is not promoting gut damage. In summary, eating legumes for fiber is like eating a Mounds bar for the coconut – lots of potential down sides (which we discuss in detail below) for a small potential benefit.

    In terms of micronutrient density, legumes come up short when compared to vegetables and fruit. (The lack of nutrient density in beans compared to green leafy vegetables like kale is so glaring that we can rest our “beans are nutritious” case here.)

    Finally, we don’t think we need to make a lengthy argument that legumes are an inferior source of protein compared to meat, seafood, and eggs, and that regularly consuming animal protein is your best bet to supply dietary protein (i.e. those amino acids that your body builds into your structural “stuff”). Just in case… legumes offer an incomplete amino acid profile, meaning that they do not supply all essential amino acids in biologically useful amounts. In addition, some of the proteins that are technically present in the legumes are poorly digestible, and thus not available for use in your body.

    Digging Deeper – The Legume Downside

    So legumes aren’t as awesome as the marketing might make you think. Is that really a good enough reason to ditch them altogether? Worse than simply being an inferior source of dietary protein and an unnecessary duplication of the dietary fiber supplied by the micronutrient-dense vegetables and fruit we recommend, legumes do have some major downsides – enough that we think you should keep them off your plate.

    First, while legumes do contain some protein, they also contain significant amounts of carbohydrate – often several times that of the amount of useable protein. We are certainly not carb-o-phobic, but the amount of carbohydrate you’d take in using legumes as a primary protein source would mean that you were (a) not getting enough (bioavailable) protein in an attempt to limit your carbohydrate intake to a healthy amount, or (b) taking in unhealthfully high amounts of carbohydrate to get as much protein as you need. (Or, potentially, both.) And though the carbs found in beans are low glycemic index, your body still has to secrete significant amounts of insulin to manage the relatively large amounts of blood sugar – and with insulin, like many things in your body, a little is good, but lots is… not.

    Second, legumes as a general botanical category are toxic if consumed raw. Literally… toxic. The problem is that usual preparation methods of prolonged soaking and rinsing, cooking, sprouting, or fermenting only partially neutralizes those toxic substances, generally referred to as lectins. (There are other harmful substances in legumes, but we’ll stick with lectins for now.) Lectins are plant proteins that are very resistant to digestion in the stomach and small intestine. They arrive (and hang out) in the small intestine largely intact, and do some pretty dirty work there. Lectins such as phytohaemagglutinin create damage to the wall of the small intestine (which increases gut permeability) and causes an imbalance of gut bacteria. P.S. Increased gut permeability is never a good thing.

    If your gut integrity is compromised, that means that the immune tissue located in your gut is exposed to large amounts of potentially inflammatory substances, including those lectins. Regular exposure to lectins can promote inflammation in the digestive tract, but also elsewhere in the body (since those little buggers punched holes in your gut and can get virtually everywhere via your bloodstream). Long story short: the fewer intact foreign proteins (including lectins) circulating in your bloodstream, the better. Foreign proteins in your bloodstream cause systemic inflammation. Boooo.

    Specific to Soy

    A third concern, specific to soybeans and even moreso with processed soy products, is the content of compounds that behave like estrogen (that female sex hormone) in the human body. These compounds, classified as phytoestrogens (or “isoflavones”), bind to and stimulate – or, in some tissues, block – estrogen receptors. And while the overall research on soy products is conflicting and inclusive due to the gender-and tissue-specific effects of phytoestrogens, there are, in our view, some alarming issues related to the consumption of soy and soy products. In women, phytoestrogens have been linked to longer and more painful menstrual periods. For guys, soy intake decreases sperm count. And studies suggest that children fed soy-based formulas may be at risk for compromised immune systems later in life. So while the research may not be cut and dried, we think you shouldn’t mess with your delicate sex hormone balance at any age, and ingesting phytoestrogens in an unknown “dose” via soy products do just that.

    As an aside, edamame (the unprocessed soybean) is not your best choice for everyday consumption, but processed soy products, including soy protein concentrate/isolate and “texturized vegetable protein”, are extra-bad choices for multiple reasons. In fact, the more processed forms of soybeans, like tofu, are an even more dense source of the phytoestrogens and other antinutrients than their unprocessed counterparts.

    For Vegetarians

    For vegetarians who are morally or ethically opposed to using animal proteins for their amino acid supply, legumes might be a “necessary evil”, since legumes – specifically soy – are some of the densest plant source of protein. However, understand that from our view, legumes won’t come anywhere close to supplying the right amount and proportion of amino acids for optimal health. (The argument is often made that some groups of people survive while eating legumes, but that doesn’t mean that legumes are your best choice to thrive.) If you’re a strict vegan, your best bet is to practice traditional preparation methods of soaking, rinsing, sprouting, fermenting and prolonged cooking, to partially break down some of those inflammatory lectins, and to rely on more dense sources of protein (less processed soy products like tofu and tempeh) that offer more grams of protein without so many accompanying carbohydrates.

    The Wrap-Up

    In summary, the claimed benefits of legumes aren’t quite what they’re heralded to be, and there are significant downsides to legume consumption. Yes, there are ways to make them “less bad”, but why work so hard to continue to eat things that in the end still aren’t that healthy? While prolonged soaking, rinsing, cooking and fermenting legumes neutralizes some of the lectins, we still don’t think that they offer enough in terms of micronutrition (vitamins, minerals, and beneficial phytochemicals) to justify regular consumption. And while the jury may be out on the long-term effects of phytoestrogens, we recommend generally avoiding legumes as part of your healthy, Eat-Good-Food diet.
    The Legume Manifesto | Whole9 | Let us change your life.

    I can't take that article seriously. I looked at the source and thought that it wasn't worth reading, but I decided to give it a shot anyway. But I stopped reading after it claimed legumes have so many downsides - then apparently ignores all the downsides of eating meat and claims meat is a more efficient source of protein. Dr. Fuhrman's diet forms complete protein. It's not hard.

    And the first thing that caught my eye was their mention of phytoestrogens. Mushrooms (a main component of Dr. Fuhrman's diet) actually lower estrogen.

    But the majority of the article I didn't read because I don't feel like getting a headache to be honest. No offense to you.



    Also, soy is not essential, but soy has many pros and cons. Meat has more cons than soy does if we're going to compare.
    Last edited by Boycott Factory Farms; 22nd October 2012 at 11:03 PM.

  7. #7
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    No offense taken, but let's be clear that you're referring to a defiency (with your scary poster) that I do not support nor call for (omitting or limiting plant based FIBER). Plant based fiber is important, and a meat BASED diet does not need to lack vegetable fiber, this is indisputable. However soy is a poor source of protein, let's argue that. Sourcing will not be a problem for me, if you do not like my source just say so and I wll try to find acceptable source material.

    There are a number of components present in soybeans that exert a negative impact on the nutritional quality of the protein. Among those factors that are destroyed by heat treatment are the protease inhibitors and lectins. Protease inhibitors exert their antinutritional effect by causing pancreatic hypertrophy/hyperplasia, which ultimately results in an inhibition of growth. The lectin, by virtue of its ability to bind to glycoprotein receptors on the epithelial cells lining the intestinal mucosa, inhibits growth by interfering with the absorption of nutrients. Of lesser significance are the antinutritional effects produced by relatively heat stable factors, such as goitrogens, tannins, phytoestrogens, flatus-producing oligosaccharides, phytate, and saponins. Other diverse but ill-defined factors appear to increase the requirements for vitamins A, B12, D, and E. The processing of soybeans under severe alkaline conditions leads to the formation of lysinoalanine, which has been shown to damage the kidneys of rats. This is not generally true, however, for edible soy protein that has been produced under milder alkaline conditions. Also meriting consideration is the allergenic response that may sometimes occur in humans, as well as calves and piglets, on dietary exposure to soybeans.Implications of antinutritional compo... [Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 1994] - PubMed - NCBI

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenridgeman View Post
    The good doc ain't making enough with his spiel to pay for advertising????
    WTF? A conservative who is against someone making money?????
    Name the patented medicine or drug that the doctor is hustling to make a buck. Last time I checked I can buy veg tables, berries and seeds at the grocery store, farmers markets or grow my own.
    So, what is your problem with the Doctor's "spiel"? You own a cattle ranch, pig farm, what? Feel free to be specific.

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