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Thread: Big Changes For Addiction Treatment Predicted Under Obamacare .

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    SUE CONGRESS the watchman's Avatar
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    Big Changes For Addiction Treatment Predicted Under Obamacare .

    An estimated 40 million people could enter treatment because the health law recognizes drug addiction and alcoholism as chronic diseases that must be covered by insurance plans, according to the California Health Report. Other news outlets report that Tennessee officials blame Obamacare for the shutdown of a state program that covered 16,000 people but didn't meet the law's coverage requirements and also how scam artists are trying to cash in on people's confusion over the law.

    Healthy Cal: ACA Brings Big Changes For Addiction Treatment
    The Affordable Care Act recognizes drug addiction and alcoholism as chronic diseases that must be covered by health insurance plans, and in so doing marks a major transformation of addiction care. The biggest change is that 40 million people could enter substance abuse treatment, opening a huge market for addiction care. “I don’t think there’s another illness that will be more affected by the Affordable Care Act,” said Dr. Thomas McLellan, former deputy director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (Urevich, 9/10).
    Big Changes For Addiction Treatment Predicted Under Obamacare - Kaiser Health News

    More on this:

    Substance abuse and drug addiction haven’t always been perceived as chronic illnesses. But since opiate abuse (which has steadily been on the rise in America), alcoholism, and other addictions cost about $120 billion per year in health care spending, the health law puts special emphasis on both treatment and prevention by forcing insurers to cover rehab and encouraging doctors to screen for potential addictions.

    Screening for budding addiction may also prevent other chronic diseases from forming or getting worse, especially since many addicts don’t actively seek care due to the associated stigma and costs. That may also wind up driving up health care costs indirectly by causing other medical problems. For instance, a diabetic American with alcoholism may be less likely to take proper medications, or young Americans who smoke marijuana to excess may end up with asthma. That has doctors hoping that Obamacare’s two-pronged approach to substance abuse could curb U.S. health care costs substantially.
    How Obamacare Could Revolutionize Addiction Treatment | ThinkProgress


    Off hand I'd have to say this is a good thing. Finally, people can get the quality care they have needed, but couldn't afford it. Since addiction is now officially recognized as a disease that must be covered by health insurance plans, this creates an additional legal barrier for employers - I would think.

    On the other hand, it could open the door up for abuse, scams and what not.

    Thoughts?
    Last edited by the watchman; 17th October 2013 at 10:04 PM.

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    Stomping RW Trolls Shanty's Avatar
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    It's great news. I have helped to get some people into rehab facilities over the years. With a couple of people, their insurance wasn't covering them any more because they had used up some arbitrary, lifetime limit of money for addiction treatment. I just lost a friend in the past several months who died because of this limit and the budget cuts in my state to help people with addictions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shanty View Post
    It's great news. I have helped to get some people into rehab facilities over the years. With a couple of people, their insurance wasn't covering them any more because they had used up some arbitrary, lifetime limit of money for addiction treatment. I just lost a friend in the past several months who died because of this limit and the budget cuts in my state to help people with addictions.
    I'm sorry to hear you lost a friend. Lost a few folks myself. I can't wait to bring this up at the next "Harm Reduction" group I attend. The lady that runs it is bound to have some insights. This is the direction that the VA has been taking for quite a few years now. More of a focus on overall treatment. Ya know, physical, mental, nutritional, peer support, housing etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shanty View Post
    It's great news. I have helped to get some people into rehab facilities over the years. With a couple of people, their insurance wasn't covering them any more because they had used up some arbitrary, lifetime limit of money for addiction treatment. I just lost a friend in the past several months who died because of this limit and the budget cuts in my state to help people with addictions.
    He died because he didn't get more rehab, or, he died because he had had lots of rehab, and it didn't work and he OD'd anyway?

    This opens the floodgates for abuse.

    Rehab is a racket; I have never known a junkie or crackhead that got rehabilitated through a rehab program.

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    I think it is great for the people that want and need the help. But as a whole I see it as being largely unsuccessful and will continue to drive costs up.

    This is one of those situations where society pays either way. Incarcerate them and pay without treatment or pay for their treatment. Both systems are likely to fail. If I am paying either way I would lean towards treatment. If they aren't committing crimes outside of drug use then give these people a chance to turn their lives around.

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    Quote Originally Posted by metheron View Post
    I think it is great for the people that want and need the help. But as a whole I see it as being largely unsuccessful and will continue to drive costs up.

    This is one of those situations where society pays either way. Incarcerate them and pay without treatment or pay for their treatment. Both systems are likely to fail. If I am paying either way I would lean towards treatment. If they aren't committing crimes outside of drug use then give these people a chance to turn their lives around.



    It would be nice to see some stats on the effectiveness of rehab, either private or government run.
    Thanks from Tedminator and the watchman

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    Senior Member Micro Machines Champion, Race Against Time Champion Tedminator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by the watchman View Post
    The Affordable Care Act recognizes drug addiction and alcoholism as chronic diseases that must be covered by health insurance plans, and in so doing marks a major transformation of addiction care. The biggest change is that 40 million people could enter substance abuse treatment, opening a huge market for addiction care.

    Thoughts?
    Sounds like a good business investment opportunity
    My local commercial area has a new 90 patient facility opening up soon.. should be good for the local economy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenridgeman View Post
    It would be nice to see some stats on the effectiveness of rehab, either private or government run.
    Mixed feelings about that. A lot of folks use the 12-Step programs where anonymity is a must. I'd hate to seem them forced to fundamentally alter their programs in order to satisfy some government requirement. I'm sure there is record keeping of some sort already being maintained in programs that presently receive gov funding to provide substance abuse treatment. Suppose those programs can be used as a template. I guess. Still there's just something about some pencil pusher government type peeking about into civilians in recovery that doesn't set right with me

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenridgeman View Post
    He died because he didn't get more rehab, or, he died because he had had lots of rehab, and it didn't work and he OD'd anyway?

    This opens the floodgates for abuse.

    Rehab is a racket; I have never known a junkie or crackhead that got rehabilitated through a rehab program.
    I do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by metheron View Post
    I think it is great for the people that want and need the help. But as a whole I see it as being largely unsuccessful and will continue to drive costs up.

    This is one of those situations where society pays either way. Incarcerate them and pay without treatment or pay for their treatment. Both systems are likely to fail. If I am paying either way I would lean towards treatment. If they aren't committing crimes outside of drug use then give these people a chance to turn their lives around.
    Thinking that with more funding there could be more individualized treatment. Which studies show results in a higher rate of recovery success. But, yeah. I agree it's a big risk either way. I am with you leaning towards recovery over incarceration. At present, all our prisons are doing is teaching inmates to e better criminals. But on the upside, the tattoo industry is thriving.

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