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Thread: Abortion On Demand In Ohio, Unless The Fetus Has Down's Syndrome

  1. #1
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Abortion On Demand In Ohio, Unless The Fetus Has Down's Syndrome



    What fucking geniuses we elect to this state's legislature.

    *Snip*

    Senate Bill 164 and House Bill 214 would prohibit a person from performing or attempting to perform or induce an abortion on a woman whose unborn child has or might have Down syndrome.

    Violators would face a fourth-degree felony. If convicted the state medical board would take away a physician’s license to practice medicine in Ohio.
    They are the latest in a series of bills before a [state] legislature that has steadily chipped away at abortion rights in recent years.

    *Snip*

    A genetic disorder, Down syndrome is caused when abnormal cell division results in an extra full or partial copy of chromosome 21. People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for some medical conditions including congenital heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems, Alzheimer’s disease, childhood leukemia and thyroid conditions. Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal condition in the United States and about one in every 700 babies in the United States is born with it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    “It’s very concerning to think that some lives would be judged as less valuable than others,” said Sen. Frank LaRose, R-Hudson, sponsor of the Senate version.

    A review published in 2012 showed termination rates following a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome ranged from 67 to 85 percent depending on maternal age, race and ethnicity and gestational age.

    *Snip*

    But Dr. Erika Boothman said the law would drive a wedge between the patient-physician relationship.

    “Even though this bill doesn’t criminalize women who get abortions, I think that anytime you hear about a law prohibiting abortion care, women get scared that they will end up being in trouble with the law if they choose to have an abortion,” said Boothman, a physician resident specializing in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Building a patient’s trust can be tough, Boothman said, especially when patients have a lower medical literacy.

    “The last thing that I want is a woman not feeling like she can come to me with questions,” Boothman said. “If you can’t ask questions of your OB/GYN, who can you ask questions to?”

    Such legislation would divide patients and physicians, said Kellie Copeland, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio.

    “They shouldn’t feel like Big Brother is watching them,” she said.

    Ohio would not be the first state to place restrictions on selective abortions.

    Seven — Arizona, Kansas, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and South Dakota — ban abortions when it comes to sex selection. Arizona enacted legislation prohibiting a woman from receiving an abortion because of race. In 2013, North Dakota became the first state to prohibit abortions in cases of genetic abnormality.

    Ohio Right to Life President Mike Gonidakis wonders what other prenatal diagnoses might lead to an abortion.

    “If we don’t draw a line and say enough is enough, how far does that continue to go?” Gonidakis asked. “It’s scary to think about.”

    The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that every pregnant woman be screened for chromosomal abnormalities, Boothman said. Doctors use “soft markers” to gauge the probability that the fetus has Down syndrome, Boothman said.

    “That can be tough to explain to patients because we’re not saying yes or no,” she said. “We’re saying here’s the probability.”

    If there is a high probability, doctors can offer two different types of diagnostic testing — amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling, Boothman said. Amniocentesis samples amniotic fluid to look for birth defects, genetic diseases and chromosomal abnormalities. Chorionic villus sampling looks for chromosome abnormalities.

    “There’s nowhere in the culture of prenatal testing or genetic counseling or obstetricians that would try to coerce or force a woman to terminate a pregnancy,” Boothman said. “This is all about providing a patient with information and letting her make the choice with what she wants to do with that information.”

    Boothman fears this would make it difficult to practice obstetrics in Ohio.

    “I think that it would make us think twice about offering prenatal testing to a patient,” she said.
    Abortion on Down syndrome fetus to be banned under Ohio bills - News - The Columbus Dispatch - Columbus, OH

    I am surprised any similar laws are still in effect. I can only assume they have not yet been in effect long enough to have been declared unconstitutional by the SCOTUS.

    This proposed law is so asinine, I barely know where to begin. The state most certainly has no place injecting itself and the criminal law into the decisions of parents facing the possibility of giving birth to a damaged baby. If they choose to do so, AFTER the baby is born, the state has certain duties to the families of such children it would not owe to the families of normal children.



    Your thoughts?
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    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    If you don't like what your child is you should kill it.

    I agree.

    Doesn't have blue eyes, kill it.

    Isn't a genius, kill it.

    Its a boy and you wanted a girl, kill it.

    Sounds perfectly reasonably to me.

  3. #3
    Veteran Member DebateDrone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post


    What fucking geniuses we elect to this state's legislature.



    Abortion on Down syndrome fetus to be banned under Ohio bills - News - The Columbus Dispatch - Columbus, OH

    I am surprised any similar laws are still in effect. I can only assume they have not yet been in effect long enough to have been declared unconstitutional by the SCOTUS.

    This proposed law is so asinine, I barely know where to begin. The state most certainly has no place injecting itself and the criminal law into the decisions of parents facing the possibility of giving birth to a damaged baby. If they choose to do so, AFTER the baby is born, the state has certain duties to the families of such children it would not owe to the families of normal children.



    Your thoughts?
    Clearly these were people that wanted a pregnancy until they found out that there was a possibility the child would be born with some form of Downs.

    All Ohio's law will do is make persons wanting an abortion to go elsewhere.
    Thanks from Madeline and Friday13

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    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
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    Down Syndrome is a serious genetic condition that cannot feasibly be compared with "not having blue eyes," or "lacking genius intelligence." Either of these two conditions are hardly impediments to a person growing into a healthy, self-sufficient person.

    By contrast, a person with Down Syndrome will likely require care for their entire lives. Some parents are capable of raising a child that lacks major genetic disorders - and these people have my utmost respect. However, I also respect those parents that know their limitations, and recognize that the unusually high demands of raising a Down Syndrome child are more than they can provide.

  5. #5
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    If you don't like what your child is you should kill it.

    I agree.

    Doesn't have blue eyes, kill it.

    Isn't a genius, kill it.

    Its a boy and you wanted a girl, kill it.

    Sounds perfectly reasonably to me.
    What goes on in my uterus is nobody's business but my own.
    Thanks from Friday13

  6. #6
    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    What goes on in my uterus is nobody's business but my own.
    And your babies.

    Don't forget that little part.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member Isalexi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    If you don't like what your child is you should kill it.

    I agree.

    Doesn't have blue eyes, kill it.

    Isn't a genius, kill it.

    Its a boy and you wanted a girl, kill it.

    Sounds perfectly reasonably to me.
    Oh no, another ridiculous strawman
    Thanks from Madeline and Friday13

  8. #8
    Veteran Member Isalexi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    And your babies.

    Don't forget that little part.
    Why don’t we call 4year olds embryos? We call embryos children.

  9. #9
    Junior Member Claudius the God's Avatar
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    Its all so simple. If you do not like abortions, don't have one.
    Thanks from Friday13 and Madeline

  10. #10
    Veteran Member Czernobog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    If you don't like what your child is you should kill it.

    I agree.

    Doesn't have blue eyes, kill it.

    Isn't a genius, kill it.

    Its a boy and you wanted a girl, kill it.

    Sounds perfectly reasonably to me.
    This isn't about "not liking it", and you know it. My wife, and I may well have decided that we are financially fit enough to start a family. However, when we learn that the fetus has, or will likely produce a child with, defects, that entirely changes the math. We are certainly not financially sound enough to raise a child and afford the ongoing medical costs of caring for a special needs child.

    Now, if you want to force us to assume that extra moral, and financial responsibility, then you - through your state government - are going to assume those costs that we were unprepared to assume, right?
    Thanks from Madeline and Dragonfly5

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