View Poll Results: Are YOU better off under Trump? (honest answer()

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  • Yes

    9 31.03%
  • No.

    14 48.28%
  • The same

    6 20.69%
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Thread: Are YOU better off under Trump?

  1. #41
    the "good" prag pragmatic's Avatar
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    This thread seems to have turned into another one of those:

    "Your team sucks!!" threads.


    (color me stunned.....)

  2. #42
    Moderator HayJenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miller47 View Post
    Completely wrong.

    More than half of Americans are invested in the stock market.

    When the stock market does good it helps far more than "only really wealthy people".

    From Gallup.com April 2015: "Fifty five percent of Americans are invested in stock market"

    That means they own stocks directly or mutual funds that are invested in stocks.

    Do you think that 55% of Americans are "really wealthy people"?

    Me neither.
    Nope

    Nearly half of country has $0 invested in the market, according to the Federal Reserve and numerous surveys by groups such as Gallup and Bankrate. That means people have no money in pension funds, 401(k) retirement plans, IRAs, mutual funds or ETFs. They certainly don't own individual stocks such as Facebook or Apple.

    Wall Street is not Main Street. Many presidents have learned that lesson. Trump's challenge is to help lift jobs and wages in the "real economy." Herlt is optimistic. He believes Trump does care about "normal, everyday people" like him.

    Stock ownership is "heavily tilted toward rich guys: doctors, lawyers, accountants. It's not the middle class," says Steven Rosenthal, a senior fellow at the Tax Policy Center. He used to work at a large corporate law firm. He saw firsthand how many of his well-paid colleagues were shoveling "six-figures a year" into the market, mostly via retirement accounts.

    Dow 22,000? Most Americans don't benefit from record stock market gains - Chicago Tribune

    However, stock ownership has slipped during that same period. According to Gallup, 52 percent of U.S. adults owned stock in 2016. Since Gallup started measuring this in 1998, that's only the second time ownership has been this low. These figures include ownership of an individual stock, a stock mutual fund or a self-directed 401(k) or IRA

    That means the stock market rally can only directly benefit around half of all Americans — and substantially fewer than it would have a decade ago, when nearly two-thirds of families owned stock.And that decline was bigger among lower-income Americans, data from the Federal Reserve show. Of the 10 percent of families with the highest income, 92 percent owned stock as of 2013, just above where it had been in 2007. But ownership slipped for people in the bottom half of the income distribution, and to a lesser degree for people who were above the median but below the top 10 percent.

    Those richest Americans own far greater amounts of stock. As of 2013, the top 10 percent of Americans owned an average of $969,000 in stocks. The next 40 percent owned $132,000 on average. For the bottom half of families, it was just under $54,000.Combine the uneven ownership rates and ownership amounts, and the total inequality in the stock market is astounding. As of 2013, the top 1 percent of households by wealth owned nearly 38 percent of all stock shares, according to research by New York University economist Edward Wolff.

    https://www.npr.org/2017/03/01/51797...e-conversation

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    Nope

    Nearly half of country has $0 invested in the market, according to the Federal Reserve and numerous surveys by groups such as Gallup and Bankrate. That means people have no money in pension funds, 401(k) retirement plans, IRAs, mutual funds or ETFs. They certainly don't own individual stocks such as Facebook or Apple.

    Wall Street is not Main Street. Many presidents have learned that lesson. Trump's challenge is to help lift jobs and wages in the "real economy." Herlt is optimistic. He believes Trump does care about "normal, everyday people" like him.

    Stock ownership is "heavily tilted toward rich guys: doctors, lawyers, accountants. It's not the middle class," says Steven Rosenthal, a senior fellow at the Tax Policy Center. He used to work at a large corporate law firm. He saw firsthand how many of his well-paid colleagues were shoveling "six-figures a year" into the market, mostly via retirement accounts.

    Dow 22,000? Most Americans don't benefit from record stock market gains - Chicago Tribune

    However, stock ownership has slipped during that same period. According to Gallup, 52 percent of U.S. adults owned stock in 2016. Since Gallup started measuring this in 1998, that's only the second time ownership has been this low. These figures include ownership of an individual stock, a stock mutual fund or a self-directed 401(k) or IRA

    That means the stock market rally can only directly benefit around half of all Americans — and substantially fewer than it would have a decade ago, when nearly two-thirds of families owned stock.And that decline was bigger among lower-income Americans, data from the Federal Reserve show. Of the 10 percent of families with the highest income, 92 percent owned stock as of 2013, just above where it had been in 2007. But ownership slipped for people in the bottom half of the income distribution, and to a lesser degree for people who were above the median but below the top 10 percent.

    Those richest Americans own far greater amounts of stock. As of 2013, the top 10 percent of Americans owned an average of $969,000 in stocks. The next 40 percent owned $132,000 on average. For the bottom half of families, it was just under $54,000.Combine the uneven ownership rates and ownership amounts, and the total inequality in the stock market is astounding. As of 2013, the top 1 percent of households by wealth owned nearly 38 percent of all stock shares, according to research by New York University economist Edward Wolff.

    https://www.npr.org/2017/03/01/51797...e-conversation
    2 million more Americans have jobs than did last year in the in the Obamaconomy. Real median household incomes and net worth are higher than they were at any time during Obama's tenure. Home values are higher than at any time during the Obama years. Life is good, much better under Trump than Obama.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libertine View Post
    2 million more Americans have jobs than did last year in the in the Obamaconomy. Real median household incomes and net worth are higher than they were at any time during Obama's tenure. Home values are higher than at any time during the Obama years. Life is good, much better under Trump than Obama.
    LOL - He inherited Obama's upward economy trend.

    There is zero proof (except stocks) to show that anything he has enacted anything that has helped the economy.

    With July's jobs report, employers have added a total of 1,074,000 jobs during Trump's first six full months in office. That essentially matches the 1,084,000 jobs created during President Barack Obama's last six months in office. Both round to 1.1 million, and the 10,000 difference is well within the margin of error of the Labor Department estimate.

    By contrast, Obama handed Trump an economy that was close to what economists consider full employment. The unemployment rate on Inauguration Day was 4.8%, and it has fallen since then, to 4.3% in July. At full employment, businesses have an extremely difficult time finding available, qualified workers to fill job openings.

    In fact, if Obama left a problem for Trump, it wasn't that the economy was too weak -- it was that the labor market was almost too strong. Employers may well be hiring faster if they weren't having so much trouble finding the workers they need.

    How Trump compares with Obama so far on jobs - Aug. 4, 2017


    Keep drinking the kool-aid.

    BTW, my husband works in the housing industry. Home prices have been going up for the last 3 years.
    Thanks from Devil505

  5. #45
    the "good" prag pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    Nope

    Nearly half of country has $0 invested in the market, according to the Federal Reserve and numerous surveys by groups such as Gallup and Bankrate. That means people have no money in pension funds, 401(k) retirement plans, IRAs, mutual funds or ETFs. They certainly don't own individual stocks such as Facebook or Apple.

    <snip>


    "Nearly half don't" is another way of saying that More than half do.


    (Girls and math......jeez.)

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by pragmatic View Post
    "Nearly half don't" is another way of saying that More than half do.


    (Girls and math......jeez.)
    I know that

    But this..again - who benefit's the most

    Those richest Americans own far greater amounts of stock. As of 2013, the top 10 percent of Americans owned an average of $969,000 in stocks. The next 40 percent owned $132,000 on average. For the bottom half of families, it was just under $54,000.Combine the uneven ownership rates and ownership amounts, and the total inequality in the stock market is astounding. As of 2013, the top 1 percent of households by wealth owned nearly 38 percent of all stock shares, according to research by New York University economist Edward Wolff.

    So we want to do away with Dodd/Frank so rich people can get richer?

  7. #47
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miller47 View Post
    Don't dismiss the importance of the stock market doing well.

    VERY well.

    I explained it to another member in post #35.
    I like when the stock market does well.

    But unless the President, either one, did something in legislation that effected the stock market - then its got nothing to do with him.

    Our dollar is up. Our stock market is up. Our unemployment is down. I’m sure it gives a boost to the governing Liberals, but I’ve never heard anyone claim that the Prime Minister was in any way responsible for that.

    He passed two annual budgets. And passed some tax changes. But that will take years to show effects on the economy.

    Has Donald Trump done anything? Set a regulation, launched a policy, laid a sanction, built some infrastructure, made a law, cancelled a law? Anything?

    Anything at all to deserve any blame or credit for it?

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by pragmatic View Post
    "Nearly half don't" is another way of saying that More than half do.


    (Girls and math......jeez.)
    You will also notice that employee 401k retirement plans were excluded.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    Nope

    Nearly half of country has $0 invested in the market, according to the Federal Reserve and numerous surveys by groups such as Gallup and Bankrate. That means people have no money in pension funds, 401(k) retirement plans, IRAs, mutual funds or ETFs. They certainly don't own individual stocks such as Facebook or Apple.

    Wall Street is not Main Street. Many presidents have learned that lesson. Trump's challenge is to help lift jobs and wages in the "real economy." Herlt is optimistic. He believes Trump does care about "normal, everyday people" like him.

    Stock ownership is "heavily tilted toward rich guys: doctors, lawyers, accountants. It's not the middle class," says Steven Rosenthal, a senior fellow at the Tax Policy Center. He used to work at a large corporate law firm. He saw firsthand how many of his well-paid colleagues were shoveling "six-figures a year" into the market, mostly via retirement accounts.

    Dow 22,000? Most Americans don't benefit from record stock market gains - Chicago Tribune

    However, stock ownership has slipped during that same period. According to Gallup, 52 percent of U.S. adults owned stock in 2016. Since Gallup started measuring this in 1998, that's only the second time ownership has been this low. These figures include ownership of an individual stock, a stock mutual fund or a self-directed 401(k) or IRA

    That means the stock market rally can only directly benefit around half of all Americans — and substantially fewer than it would have a decade ago, when nearly two-thirds of families owned stock.And that decline was bigger among lower-income Americans, data from the Federal Reserve show. Of the 10 percent of families with the highest income, 92 percent owned stock as of 2013, just above where it had been in 2007. But ownership slipped for people in the bottom half of the income distribution, and to a lesser degree for people who were above the median but below the top 10 percent.

    Those richest Americans own far greater amounts of stock. As of 2013, the top 10 percent of Americans owned an average of $969,000 in stocks. The next 40 percent owned $132,000 on average. For the bottom half of families, it was just under $54,000.Combine the uneven ownership rates and ownership amounts, and the total inequality in the stock market is astounding. As of 2013, the top 1 percent of households by wealth owned nearly 38 percent of all stock shares, according to research by New York University economist Edward Wolff.

    https://www.npr.org/2017/03/01/51797...e-conversation
    Yeah, but you said "ONLY REALLY WEALTHY PEOPLE" did you not?

    More than half of Americans are invested in the stock market and thus will benefit, as I pointed out.

    You are just wrong on this issue.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    LOL - He inherited Obama's upward economy trend.

    There is zero proof (except stocks) to show that anything he has enacted anything that has helped the economy.

    With July's jobs report, employers have added a total of 1,074,000 jobs during Trump's first six full months in office. That essentially matches the 1,084,000 jobs created during President Barack Obama's last six months in office. Both round to 1.1 million, and the 10,000 difference is well within the margin of error of the Labor Department estimate.

    By contrast, Obama handed Trump an economy that was close to what economists consider full employment. The unemployment rate on Inauguration Day was 4.8%, and it has fallen since then, to 4.3% in July. At full employment, businesses have an extremely difficult time finding available, qualified workers to fill job openings.

    In fact, if Obama left a problem for Trump, it wasn't that the economy was too weak -- it was that the labor market was almost too strong. Employers may well be hiring faster if they weren't having so much trouble finding the workers they need.

    How Trump compares with Obama so far on jobs - Aug. 4, 2017


    Keep drinking the kool-aid.

    BTW, my husband works in the housing industry. Home prices have been going up for the last 3 years.
    The Obamaeconomy growth was on a downward trend 2010 through 2016, all the way down to 1.6% in 2016. It's over 50% higher now.

    If your home is worth more in 2017 than 2016, you make more, you retirement account has grown and there are more jobs available, aren't you better off.

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