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Thread: Passover Begins Monday April 10, 2017

  1. #11
    Inside Your Heads syrenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    The desserts? Really? Those usually kinda suck, due to the whole "no flour" thing.

    Flourless Chocolate Cake Recipe | King Arthur Flour


    Thanks from Madeline

  2. #12
    Inside Your Heads syrenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    We're celebrating our Passover seder at my parents' house this weekend. First time we haven't hosted it ourselves in several years.

    Of course, ours is a "lite" version. An Orthodox seder typically runs about 12 hours over two evenings. Ours runs about 90 minutes over one evening. Two hours if my slow-eating sister-in-law is with us.

    We also use a highly abridged version of the Haggadah. It's a "Humanist Haggadah" that removes most references to God, and instead focuses on history, society, and tells the Biblical narratives as metaphorical stories rather than actual events.

    And the food? Damn awesome.

    As far as wishing Jews a "Happy Passover," it's really not necessary. Jews may wish each other "Pesach Sameach" ("PAY-sock sah-MEY-akh"), but do not typically expect any such greeting from gentiles. I suppose it wouldn't be out of order if you are a guest at someone's Seder.
    alright... food must come with pics and recipes .
    Thanks from Madeline

  3. #13
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    The desserts? Really? Those usually kinda suck, due to the whole "no flour" thing.
    O, no. The sponge cake, and that chocolate pudding-like thing.....yum!

  4. #14
    Veteran Member Isalexi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eve1 View Post
    Anybody can celebrate what ever they like. Hopefully it will be a quiet Easter Break or Passover Break or School Break or whatever it is, one likes to call it.
    Spring break

  5. #15
    Veteran Member Isalexi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    We're celebrating our Passover seder at my parents' house this weekend. First time we haven't hosted it ourselves in several years.

    Of course, ours is a "lite" version. An Orthodox seder typically runs about 12 hours over two evenings. Ours runs about 90 minutes over one evening. Two hours if my slow-eating sister-in-law is with us.

    We also use a highly abridged version of the Haggadah. It's a "Humanist Haggadah" that removes most references to God, and instead focuses on history, society, and tells the Biblical narratives as metaphorical stories rather than actual events.

    And the food? Damn awesome.

    As far as wishing Jews a "Happy Passover," it's really not necessary. Jews may wish each other "Pesach Sameach" ("PAY-sock sah-MEY-akh"), but do not typically expect any such greeting from gentiles. I suppose it wouldn't be out of order if you are a guest at someone's Seder.
    We also have a revised Haggadah....sounds similar to yours. This year I feel kind of sad because we are not having a seder because my kids are at a club med in Cancun (poor kids and my nephews are also on vacation,
    Thanks from Madeline and Djinn

  6. #16
    Veteran Member Isalexi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    Most Jewish holidays tend to be solemn... And I'm sure that Orthodox Jews treat the Seders with all due reverence. We don't - but I have only the highest respect for those that do.
    We never saw it as solemn...we sang songs and had so much fun.
    Thanks from Ian Jeffrey and Madeline

  7. #17
    Inside Your Heads syrenn's Avatar
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    all i know is i am out to gather up my charouset ingredients.

  8. #18
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    And lasts until sundown, Tuesday April 18th.
    The first two days and the last two days are the holiday days (called "yomim tovim," literally "good days"), which involve restrictions similar to Shabbat, with some exceptions (revolving primarily around cooking food). The four days in-between (including Shabbat) are called "Chol HaMoed," with few restrictions.
    Thanks from Madeline

  9. #19
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    An Orthodox seder typically runs about 12 hours over two evenings.
    More accurately, there are two seders - one the first night (this year, this coming Monday night) and a another one the second night. They are two seders, not one big one. And the length varies. One rabbi's family I know tends to end around 3-4am, maybe later. They are usually still going by the time I pass by on my way home. The first one I'm going to this year (at a different rabbi's house) will probably get out around 1am, while the second night at a friend's house will probably get out around midnight.

    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    We also use a highly abridged version of the Haggadah. It's a "Humanist Haggadah" that removes most references to God, and instead focuses on history, society, and tells the Biblical narratives as metaphorical stories rather than actual events.
    As an orthodox Jew, we use the unabridged versions. In fact, it was the "unabridgement" of things in general (not just Passover - my first time in an orthodox synagogue was on Yom Kippur) that made me appreciate orthodoxy

    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    As far as wishing Jews a "Happy Passover," it's really not necessary. Jews may wish each other "Pesach Sameach" ("PAY-sock sah-MEY-akh"), but do not typically expect any such greeting from gentiles. I suppose it wouldn't be out of order if you are a guest at someone's Seder.
    I've rarely heard "Pesach Sameach." Usually we (by which I mean my particular community) say "chag sameach" ("happy holiday").
    Thanks from Madeline

  10. #20
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNVolunteer73 View Post
    Djinn Passover I have always pictured it as a much more solemn event than a "Happy" event.
    It is both. Release from slavery is a happy event.
    Thanks from Madeline

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