Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 88
Thanks Tree40Thanks

Thread: Passover Begins Monday April 10, 2017

  1. #1
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    47,201
    Thanks
    28121

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio

    Passover Begins Monday April 10, 2017

    And lasts until sundown, Tuesday April 18th.

    What is it? What's it mean? Should non-Jews wish Jews a "Happy Passover"?

    This holiday commemorates the Exodus from Egypt. If you've seen Cecil B. DeMille's "The Ten Commandments," then you know the story of Passover, more or less. Passover is celebrated for seven or eight days (depending on your branch of Judaism) starting on the night of a full moon in April. Passover usually overlaps with Easter, though occasionally Passover occurs a month after Easter.

    Almost all American Jews observe Passover to some extent, even if only to go to their parents' house for a ritual dinner (called a seder, pronounced SAY-der) on the first and/or second night of the holiday. Most (though not all) American Jews avoid bread and grain products to one extent or another throughout this holiday, in memory of the fact that our ancestors left Egypt in a hurry and didn't have time to wait for their bread to rise. You should avoid scheduling events involving food during this holiday, and should avoid scheduling travel for Jews because it may be hard for them to find suitable food away from home.

    Strictly observant Jews do not work, go to school or carry out any business on the first two and last two days of Passover (first one day and last one day for some branches). This is a requirement of Jewish law; however, only about 10% of the American Jewish population observes this rule strictly. Most American Jews will work through Passover, although many may want to take time off the day before Passover, to prepare for the big family dinner. To put this in perspective: imagine if you had to work during the day of Thanksgiving, then prepare for Thanksgiving dinner after getting home from work.

    Remember that Passover, like all Jewish holidays, begins the evening before the date that it appears on your calendar. If your calendar says that Passover starts on April 24, then Passover really begins with the family dinner on the night of April 23.
    Judaism 101: A Gentile's Guide to the Jewish Holidays

    I have no religious affiliation but would like to offer Passover greetings to my close Jewish friends. What would be a proper greeting?

    “Happy Passover” would be appropriate. If you want to sound really with-it, say “Happy Pay-sach” (“sach” rhymes with “Bach”, as in Johann Sebastian). If you’re really daring you can try the traditional greeting of “Chag Kasher V’Sameach”, which means “Have a Happy and Kosher Holiday.”

    This reminds me of the story of someone who made their best attempt to say this traditional greeting but it came out as “I hope you all have a Happy and Kosher Hog!”
    ...as I said, “Happy Passover” is sufficient.
    Ask the Rabbi, JewishAnswers.org » Passover Greeting

    So, to all our Jewish PHers:

    Thanks from Djinn and Ian Jeffrey

  2. #2
    Veteran Member TNVolunteer73's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    28,860
    Thanks
    7474

    From
    TN
    We celebrate Christ's resurrection over the Passover, not Easter.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Eve1's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    11,903
    Thanks
    7753

    From
    My own world
    Anybody can celebrate what ever they like. Hopefully it will be a quiet Easter Break or Passover Break or School Break or whatever it is, one likes to call it.
    Last edited by Eve1; 8th April 2017 at 05:59 AM.
    Thanks from Madeline

  4. #4
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    40,198
    Thanks
    24903

    From
    Pennsylvania, USA
    We're celebrating our Passover seder at my parents' house this weekend. First time we haven't hosted it ourselves in several years.

    Of course, ours is a "lite" version. An Orthodox seder typically runs about 12 hours over two evenings. Ours runs about 90 minutes over one evening. Two hours if my slow-eating sister-in-law is with us.

    We also use a highly abridged version of the Haggadah. It's a "Humanist Haggadah" that removes most references to God, and instead focuses on history, society, and tells the Biblical narratives as metaphorical stories rather than actual events.

    And the food? Damn awesome.

    As far as wishing Jews a "Happy Passover," it's really not necessary. Jews may wish each other "Pesach Sameach" ("PAY-sock sah-MEY-akh"), but do not typically expect any such greeting from gentiles. I suppose it wouldn't be out of order if you are a guest at someone's Seder.
    Thanks from Blueneck

  5. #5
    Veteran Member TNVolunteer73's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    28,860
    Thanks
    7474

    From
    TN
    Djinn Passover I have always pictured it as a much more solemn event than a "Happy" event.

    Kind of how I look at "Good Friday" in the Christian faith.

  6. #6
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    47,201
    Thanks
    28121

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    We're celebrating our Passover seder at my parents' house this weekend. First time we haven't hosted it ourselves in several years.

    Of course, ours is a "lite" version. An Orthodox seder typically runs about 12 hours over two evenings. Ours runs about 90 minutes over one evening. Two hours if my slow-eating sister-in-law is with us.

    We also use a highly abridged version of the Haggadah. It's a "Humanist Haggadah" that removes most references to God, and instead focuses on history, society, and tells the Biblical narratives as metaphorical stories rather than actual events.

    And the food? Damn awesome.
    It is. I have been honored to attend a few Seders. I have a tremendous affection for the chicken, and the deserts.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    47,201
    Thanks
    28121

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Quote Originally Posted by TNVolunteer73 View Post
    Djinn Passover I have always pictured it as a much more solemn event than a "Happy" event.

    Kind of how I look at "Good Friday" in the Christian faith.
    I think that's an error, TNV. It is joyous, as I understand it.

  8. #8
    Veteran Member TNVolunteer73's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    28,860
    Thanks
    7474

    From
    TN
    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    I think that's an error, TNV. It is joyous, as I understand it.
    I could be wrong. I just always pictured it that way..

  9. #9
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    40,198
    Thanks
    24903

    From
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    It is. I have been honored to attend a few Seders. I have a tremendous affection for the chicken, and the deserts.
    The desserts? Really? Those usually kinda suck, due to the whole "no flour" thing.

  10. #10
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    40,198
    Thanks
    24903

    From
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Quote Originally Posted by TNVolunteer73 View Post
    Djinn Passover I have always pictured it as a much more solemn event than a "Happy" event.

    Kind of how I look at "Good Friday" in the Christian faith.
    Most Jewish holidays tend to be solemn... And I'm sure that Orthodox Jews treat the Seders with all due reverence. We don't - but I have only the highest respect for those that do.
    Thanks from Madeline

Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Merle Haggard April 6, 1937 – April 6, 2016
    By NightSwimmer in forum Current Events
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 6th April 2016, 01:25 PM
  2. Happy easter/passover!
    By justonemorevoice in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 4th April 2010, 04:40 AM
  3. 2017: The System begins to Fail
    By conservative in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 29th April 2007, 06:14 PM
  4. April 6th, the attack on iran begins:
    By The_Bear in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 31st March 2007, 08:10 PM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed