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Thread: Younger Americans are moving away from religion

  1. #21
    Mad Genius For Hire Puzzling Evidence's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Czernobog View Post
    I'm sure you want to believe that. However, the truth is that young people just don't care about religion. They no longer need myths to tell them why the sun rises, and where babies come from. As science, reason, and logic replace myths, fairy tales, and superstitions religion is slowly, but surely dying out.
    This isnt what is indicated by your link at all. All it is saying, is that people don't go to church as much and that they identify less with any particular religion. If there is more than that listed, i did not see it.

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    Veteran Member Czernobog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puzzling Evidence View Post
    This isnt what is indicated by your link at all. All it is saying, is that people don't go to church as much and that they identify less with any particular religion. If there is more than that listed, i did not see it.
    At the very least, it demonstrates a shift away from theism. Now, if you want to argue that these young people still harbour deistic beliefs in some nebulous "higher power", okay. I might agree there. However, the hold that organised, theistic religion has on culture is certainly being lost in the US.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Czernobog View Post
    I'm sure you want to believe that. However, the truth is that young people just don't care about religion. They no longer need myths to tell them why the sun rises, and where babies come from. As science, reason, and logic replace myths, fairy tales, and superstitions religion is slowly, but surely dying out.
    My Grandfather used to think that way. On his death bed he realized eternity was a better choice and chose Christ. Most of these "Nones" think they will live forever. Its a passing faze

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    Quote Originally Posted by Puzzling Evidence View Post
    From this sites rules in Jenn's sig:

    Political Hotwire Rules and Guidelines

    1 Do not use personal insults.

    Attack the post and not the poster - debate the topic, not the poster.
    You're kidding, right? You just attacked the poster.
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    O for one, am very glad to see people moving away from delusions. The world will be a better place for it.

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    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
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    Edit: Corrected typo in thread title.

  7. #27
    Veteran Member Czernobog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aboutenough View Post
    My Grandfather used to think that way. On his death bed he realized eternity was a better choice and chose Christ. Most of these "Nones" think they will live forever. Its a passing faze
    That's presumptuous. Most of those "nones", in fact, are well aware that life ends. They are just not afraid of that like theists are. Theists are so terrified of lefe ending that they feel the need to fill the void of nothing with fairy tales of cities of gold, and happily ever afters.

    The new generation is more rational. They don't need fairy tales to comfort them. I might also point out that this is a generational study. Did you miss the part where those whose parents were also "nones" is growing. In other words, it isn't just a "phase" they'll grow out of. Quite the opposite. These new champions of reason are growing up, and teaching their children to respect reason over fantasy, as well.
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    Veteran Member Czernobog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    Edit: Corrected typo in thread title.
    Thank you. I tried. It wouldn't let me for some reason.

  9. #29
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    I have never understood the myriad of people I have run into who will say some variation of "I'm not religious but I am spiritual."

    I don't think you can put those into the believe in god but don't go to church category.

    The other thing is the number of people I know that will say on a form that they are Christian but haven't been to church since the last time a good friend or relative was married, don't know any bible outside of what might show up in TV mystery plots or any other outward signs of being religious at all.
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  10. #30
    Junior Member fenrir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Czernobog View Post
    According to a new, massive study, American youth are moving away from religion:
    Recent cohorts of American adolescents are less religiously oriented than their predecessors, although the majority are still involved with religion (see Table 1). First, American adolescents are now less likely to attend religious services. Twice as many 12th graders in 2010–13 reported “never” attending services (21%) compared to 1976–79 (10%). Compared to the early 1970s (12%), more than twice as many college students in the 2010s never attended services (27%). Similar, though smaller, declines (23% and 43%) appear among 8th and 10th graders between the early 1990s and the 2010s. Across all groups, the shift is most pronounced after 2000 as Millennials enter the samples, with the number not attending services increasing 50% for 12th graders (from 14% to 21%), 33% for 10th graders (15% to 20%), and 31% for 8th graders (13% to 17%) between 2000 and 2013. The percentage attending services weekly has also declined steadily; while 40% of 12th graders did so in 1976–79, only 30% did in 2010–13 (see Table 1 and Fig 1). For 10th and 12th graders, almost all of the decline in religious service attendance (d’s = -.13 and-.14) occurred between 2000 and 2013.​

    And, just in case anyone one wants to suggest that all this indicates is that young people are less disciplined than older Americans; that they just don't attend services, while still being just as religious as their parents - then the study also discovered this:

    More than twice as many recent 12th graders chose “none” for their religious affiliation compared to the 1960s and 1970s, though the majority still choose a religious affiliation (see Fig 2). Thirty-eight percent more 8th graders and 53% more 10th graders chose “none” as their religious preference in 2010–13 compared to 1991–94. The increase in religious “nones” was especially steep over the last decade. Between 2000 and 2010–13, 31% more 8th graders (13% compared to 17%) professed no religious affiliation, as did 43% more 10th graders (14% to 20%) and 50% more 12th graders (16% to 24%). Three times as many college students in the 2010s (vs. the late 1960s) reported no religious affiliation, though the majority are still affiliated. In just the 13 years between 2000 and 2013, 87% more college students chose no religious affiliation (15% vs. 28%). Compared to the early 1970s, four times as many reported that their mother had no religious affiliation, and more than twice as many reported that their father had no religious affiliation. The gap between students’ affiliation and parents’ affiliation has grown (see Table 1); this suggests both that more students grew up without religion and that more are abandoning their parents’ religion by college entry.

    Notice the part I emphasised. So, the proverbial verdict is in: As the older generation dies, religion, and myth is being replaced with logic, and reason. I expect it won't be long before the theists come rushing in to explain how the study doesn't really mean what it means. Either that, or they'll just ignore this OP all together, and hope that no one notices it.
    Pray tell, what constitutes "logic and reason" to liberals?

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