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Thread: Younger Americans are moving away from religion

  1. #41
    Moderator HayJenn's Avatar
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    College-aged millennials today are far more likely than the general population to be religiously unaffiliated. This is true when they are compared to previous generations as well.In fact, the Pew Research Center documents that millennials are the least outwardly religious American generation, where “one in four are unaffiliated with any religion, far more than the share of older adults when they were ages 18 to 29.”Just over 60 percent of millennials say that Christianity is “judgmental,” and 64 percent say that “anti-gay” best describes most churches today.

    4. Lack of spiritual authenticity among adults. Many youth have had no -- or very limited -- exposure to adult role models who know what they believe, why they believe it, and are committed to consistently living it out.

    5. The church’s cultural influence has diminished. The little neighborhood church is often assumed to be irrelevant, and there is no cultural guilt anymore for those who abandon involvement.

    7. Intellectual skepticism. College students are encouraged to accept platitudes like “life is about asking questions, not about dogmatic answers.” Is that the answer? That there are no answers? Claiming to have answers is viewed as “impolite.” On life’s ultimate questions, it is much more socially acceptable to “suspend judgment.”

    Ten reasons millennials are backing away from God and Christianity | Fox News

    While atheism is on the rise, especially among younger people - I don't understand some of the "panic" i see in this thread. Most people still identify as Christian. Are some trying to imply that if you are not religious that makes you less of a person?
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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by fenrir View Post
    Nancy Pelosi is a devout Catholic mother of five. Obama is a christian. When was the last time you questioned either of them?
    I've never spoken with either one. Being a Christian and being an idiot fundie that can't think his way out of a wet paper bag are two different things.

    Does that clarify things for you?
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  3. #43
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    College-aged millennials today are far more likely than the general population to be religiously unaffiliated. This is true when they are compared to previous generations as well.In fact, the Pew Research Center documents that millennials are the least outwardly religious American generation, where “one in four are unaffiliated with any religion, far more than the share of older adults when they were ages 18 to 29.”Just over 60 percent of millennials say that Christianity is “judgmental,” and 64 percent say that “anti-gay” best describes most churches today.

    4. Lack of spiritual authenticity among adults. Many youth have had no -- or very limited -- exposure to adult role models who know what they believe, why they believe it, and are committed to consistently living it out.

    5. The church’s cultural influence has diminished. The little neighborhood church is often assumed to be irrelevant, and there is no cultural guilt anymore for those who abandon involvement.

    7. Intellectual skepticism. College students are encouraged to accept platitudes like “life is about asking questions, not about dogmatic answers.” Is that the answer? That there are no answers? Claiming to have answers is viewed as “impolite.” On life’s ultimate questions, it is much more socially acceptable to “suspend judgment.”

    Ten reasons millennials are backing away from God and Christianity | Fox News

    While atheism is on the rise, especially among younger people - I don't understand some of the "panic" i see in this thread. Most people still identify as Christian. Are some trying to imply that if you are not religious that makes you less of a person?
    Anecdotal, but quite a few of my kids friends attend these non denominational churches. Like you said, they often feel the mainstream churches are bigoted or have rules that are too restrictive. So they go to these once in a while. I also know the Unitarian churches are swelling like mad since they are extremely welcoming of the LGBTQ community. The ones around here are packed. I think perhaps it isn't the whole belief thing but rather the actual church part.
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  4. #44
    Veteran Member Czernobog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fenrir View Post
    Not a problem. Try this article, or this one. If you need more just ask.

    Democrats are no more the party of science than my dog spot. But hey, keep making that claim.


    Your first article was an opinion piece, drawing conclusions from FBI studies that are unfounded - there is no evidence of correlation. Are more men arrested because women are less likely to commit crimes? Or because they are better at getting away with committing crimes? Or because the law tends to be more forgiving of women offenders? See? Your article takes the raw data, and draws a conclusion that is simply not supported by just the raw dats provided.

    Your second article purports to be about how unscientific liberals are, yet, even in the article it states, "Concerns about vaccine safety and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are often held up as evidence of anti-scientific beliefs among liberals. But opinion polls about those two issues rarely ask about political affiliation the way polls about climate change and evolution do." It then goes on to demonstrate a equivocation that would seem to contradict your point: "The exception is a 2009 Pew Research survey, which indicated that Democrats and Republicans appear to support child vaccination equally (71 percent of both favor it)."

    You keep posting these articles. Are you expecting me to not read them, and discover that they don't claim what you claim they do, at least not effectively?

    Why not just stick to the topic. This isn't about conservative, and liberal. There are plenty of irrational theistic adherents to religion in both ideologies. This is about reason over superstitious religion.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Anecdotal, but quite a few of my kids friends attend these non denominational churches. Like you said, they often feel the mainstream churches are bigoted or have rules that are too restrictive. So they go to these once in a while. I also know Unitarian churchesare swelling like mad since they are extremely welcoming of the LGBTQ community. The ones around here are packed. I think perhaps it isn't the whole belief thing but rather the actual church part.
    Yep, the Unitarian churches sure do not fit the mold of your stereotypical church.
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  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by fenrir View Post
    And that has what to do with the topic??

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by fenrir View Post
    As is shown by the study, they are including tithes. Is that charity giving?

    And here's some truth: Are Religious People Really More Generous Than Atheists? A New Study Puts That Myth to Rest

    And an MIT study that confirms this: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers....act_id=2148033

    At the state level, we find no evidence of a relationship between charitable giving and Republican presidential voteshare. Finally, we show that any remaining differences in giving are an artifact of Republicans' greater propensity to give to religious causes, particularly their own church. Taken together, our results counter the notion that political conservatives compensate for their opposition to governmental intervention by supporting private charities.
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    Taken together, our results counter the notion that political conservatives compensate for their opposition to governmental intervention by supporting private charities.
    It's always been a poor excuse for not supporting programs that help people. Transparent baloney.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Czernobog View Post
    That's presumptuous. Most of those "nones", in fact, are well aware that life ends. They are just not afraid of that like theists are. Theists are so terrified of lefe ending that they feel the need to fill the void of nothing with fairy tales of cities of gold, and happily ever afters.

    The new generation is more rational. They don't need fairy tales to comfort them. I might also point out that this is a generational study. Did you miss the part where those whose parents were also "nones" is growing. In other words, it isn't just a "phase" they'll grow out of. Quite the opposite. These new champions of reason are growing up, and teaching their children to respect reason over fantasy, as well.
    Being a None is a fairy tale to me.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by RNG View Post
    I have never understood the myriad of people I have run into who will say some variation of "I'm not religious but I am spiritual."

    I don't think you can put those into the believe in god but don't go to church category.

    The other thing is the number of people I know that will say on a form that they are Christian but haven't been to church since the last time a good friend or relative was married, don't know any bible outside of what might show up in TV mystery plots or any other outward signs of being religious at all.
    Could be cultural Christians. Grew up with it in family or visited church a couple times with a friend. They are noncommitted

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