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Thread: Top 6 Novels Billionaires Say Shaped Their Views

  1. #31
    Vexatious Correspondent Leo2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    I already read one Asminov novel! Lol.

    This is exactly how I feel about Shakespeare. I already read one!

    Are there movies based on these Asminov Foundation books?
    Lol! For shame! Reading Shakespeare, now that I am no longer in high school, is one of my favourite pastimes. His recognition of the splendours and frailties of the human condition, combined with the beauty of his language, put him on a plane far above the Isaac Asimovs (worthy as they are) of the literary world. Have you read Richard III, The Merchant of Venice, Richard II, or Macbeth?

    Probably the least enjoyable writer I have experienced, although he tells a cracking yarn, is Grisham. His command of the language is barely secondary school level - peppered as it is with solecisms, and grammar is seemingly only known to him as a childish term for his father's or mother's mother. I soldiered through The Firm, but gave up on The Client. He made American law and jurisprudence seem very similar to accountancy or actuarial practice (and about as interesting). The only thing which sustained me throughout the work was the dubious pleasure of highlighting the misspellings and grammatical solecisms - each page ended up with generous splashes of yellow textacolour.
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  2. #32
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo2 View Post
    Lol! For shame! Reading Shakespeare, now that I am no longer in high school, is one of my favourite pastimes. His recognition of the splendours and frailties of the human condition, combined with the beauty of his language, put him on a plane far above the Isaac Asimovs (worthy as they are) of the literary world. Have you read Richard III, The Merchant of Venice, Richard II, or Macbeth?

    Probably the least enjoyable writer I have experienced, although he tells a cracking yarn, is Grisham. His command of the language is barely secondary school level - peppered as it is with solecisms, and grammar is seemingly only known to him as a childish term for his father's or mother's mother. I soldiered through The Firm, but gave up on The Client. He made American law and jurisprudence seem very similar to accountancy or actuarial practice (and about as interesting). The only thing which sustained me throughout the work was the dubious pleasure of highlighting the misspellings and grammatical solecisms - each page ended up with generous splashes of yellow textacolour.
    Grisham certainly could have used a better editor, but, his tales of American jurisprudence are remarkably spot-on. Did you see "The Rainmaker"? The book is better, but the movie is good enough.



    There really are insurance companies that evil, and they really do abuse people that badly. There really are personal injury lawyers that sleazy. I have known more than one who kept a salt water tank full of sharks.

    As for Shakespeare, you remind me of my kid. She has read the entire works, probably more than once, for pleasure. I cannot force myself to do it, although I love just about any live performance of his plays. Even most of the movies.

    I admit it: I am less than fully evolved, as to the English language.
    Last edited by Madeline; 15th June 2017 at 04:03 AM.
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  3. #33
    Member Iolo's Avatar
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    Well, the Ayn Rand Crap is the equivalent of one-time Chinese genuflexions to Chairman Mao, politically necessary for robbers to get by in a one-party state, but the others depress me rather, because they don't include anything very serious or, indeed, interesting now. I was brought up on most of them, but hope I've moved on considerably. There it is though - if you want to make money, avoid culture and deep thought!
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  4. #34
    Sally Sitter Paris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    It is a news article I linked as interesting. I do not run CNBC.
    Never said you did. I just asked if there was more to this bookstore than some insipid appliance.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    Shaping my world view, mind you. Yours are great choices, and I haven't read them all. These recommendations are great!

    I would add:

    The Plague, by Albert Camus

    Madam Bovary, by Gustav Flaubert

    All the Miss Marple novels, but especially Nemesis
    Ms. Madeline,

    The Plague was good, but pointless (maybe that's the point).

    Madam Bovary was also good, but not one that stuck with me.

  6. #36
    quichierbichen
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo2 View Post
    Lol! For shame! Reading Shakespeare, now that I am no longer in high school, is one of my favourite pastimes. His recognition of the splendours and frailties of the human condition, combined with the beauty of his language, put him on a plane far above the Isaac Asimovs (worthy as they are) of the literary world. Have you read Richard III, The Merchant of Venice, Richard II, or Macbeth?

    Probably the least enjoyable writer I have experienced, although he tells a cracking yarn, is Grisham. His command of the language is barely secondary school level - peppered as it is with solecisms, and grammar is seemingly only known to him as a childish term for his father's or mother's mother. I soldiered through The Firm, but gave up on The Client. He made American law and jurisprudence seem very similar to accountancy or actuarial practice (and about as interesting). The only thing which sustained me throughout the work was the dubious pleasure of highlighting the misspellings and grammatical solecisms - each page ended up with generous splashes of yellow textacolour.
    Grisham isn't what anyone would call "literary fiction," but I like reading it myself. Mind candy.
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  7. #37
    Human Bean KnotaFrayed's Avatar
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    A few more....

    The Boy in the Striped Pajamas – By John Boyne





    Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence - by Doris Pilkington





    Pay it Forward – By Catherine Ryan Hyde

    Last edited by KnotaFrayed; 15th June 2017 at 08:17 AM.
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  8. #38
    Human Bean KnotaFrayed's Avatar
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    Crossing to Safety – Wallace Stegner - Found most of Wallace Stegner's books to be captivating...He wrote quite a few besides these shown...




    Wolf Willow
    – Wallace Stegner




    The Living – by Annie Dillard - Emotionally a dark novel.....not unlike "Snow Falling on Cedars" by David Guterson......same general geographic area, different time periods.....could be the weather of the area that adds to some underlying darkness about them...

    Last edited by KnotaFrayed; 15th June 2017 at 08:16 AM.
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  9. #39
    Human Bean KnotaFrayed's Avatar
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    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - By Ken Kesey




    Sometimes a Great Notion - By Ken Kesey




    The Hobbit, Lord of the Rings, The Silmarilion By J.R.R. Tolkien (Not just fantasy novels, but an underlying discussion about good & evil and the temptation (Ring) to do evil, in the name, of good. Do evil acts, employed in the name of good, vanquish evil or perpetuate it? Are evil and good based in our acts only or in combination with our capacity to recognize the nature of our acts.....We employ evil acts in the name of good.....and sometimes.....we may act in good ways, with evil, ulterior motives, such as those who might lure another with something nice or doing something good....but with the thought to do something evil to them. (Hansel and Gretel or luring children with candy for example, to do something horrific to them).






    Last edited by KnotaFrayed; 15th June 2017 at 08:17 AM.
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  10. #40
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    Are there movies based on these Asminov Foundation books?
    Not that I've ever heard of. The first three books - short story collections, really - probably would not translate well into film.
    Thanks from Madeline

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