Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Can Democrats Run Cities?

  1. #1
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    51,003
    Thanks
    29569

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio

    Can Democrats Run Cities?

    We ought to look where income inequality seems to be the worst. It seems to be worst in cities run by Democrats, governors of states run by Democrats and countries currently run by Democrats. So the thing is, let’s look for root causes.”
    — Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), Republican debate on Fox Business News, Nov. 10, 2015
    *Snip*

    Eight of the 10 cities with the most inequality have Democratic mayors (six of the eight are non-partisan offices). Miami has a Republican mayor, and the Minneapolis mayor in 2012 and 2013 was a member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party. Among the cities with the least inequality, six are led by Republicans (Albuquerque, Oklahoma City, Colorado Springs, Mesa, Arlington, Virginia Beach). Raleigh’s mayor is unaffiliated with a party. Columbus, Las Vegas and Nashville are led by Democrats and the latter two are non-partisan offices.

    This correlation does not necessarily represent a causation. As regular readers know, at The Fact Checker we raise a red flag when a politician credits or blames the economic trends of a city or state to the policy decisions — or even the party affiliation — of a single executive. Our friends at PolitiFact ranked this portion of Paul’s statement Half True in 2014.

    Indeed, there are other factors that the cities at either end of the spectrum have in common with each other than their mayors’ political parties. The most unequal cities also are urban cities contained within a small geographic boundary, with bigger, yet more concentrated populations. Many of the unequal cities have concentrations of high-paying jobs in technology and financial or professional services, noted Alan Berube, the study’s author and senior fellow and deputy director of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program.

    Think: Wall Street in New York, Silicon Valley in San Francisco, Hollywood in Los Angeles.

    “The lower you get in the U.S. system, the less the political affiliation [of the leader] really matters,” Berube said. Most mayors, regardless of their party, care about the economic development of their city, want to improve residents’ incomes and invest in low-income neighborhoods. Plus, structural economic policies set at the federal level have more to do with income inequality than local policies, Berube said.

    The cities with the most equal income distributions mainly are geographically big cities in the South and West, with large swaths of incorporated suburban territory, the authors wrote. They are not home to concentrations of lucrative industries. These cities could agree to include a new subdivision or annex unincorporated area — therefore, expanding city boundaries to accommodate more middle-income, suburban communities.

    “Large populations, diverse housing types, and generally progressive politics mean that most cities will always have higher shares of the rich and poor than smaller places. But the contemporary causes and consequences of inequality in cities vary greatly across the national map,” the authors wrote.

    *Snip*
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.44107cae2439

    I don't think there is anything inherently defective in the Democratic Party such that if they acquire power in a city, they cause damage to its economy.

    I do think these big, old American cities with longterm Democratic rule have a culture of public corruption that becomes and intractable barrier to change.

  2. #2
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    51,003
    Thanks
    29569

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio


    Republicans for the moment are pleased to be a non-factor. But that eventually is going to have to change. There is no city in the United States larger than San Diego with a Republican mayor. A Republican and a pseudo-Republican were, for a time, able to thrive politically in New York owing to the unusual character of Rudy Giuliani and the fact that the millionaire residents of an economically resurgent Manhattan wanted to be able to travel from a Broadway theater to a Soho restaurant without passing through Beirut. (New Yorkers, alas, have short memories, and thus have turned the city over to Bill de Blasio, with predictable results.) Conservatives as such are not players in the real-world politics of our largest cities: New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Phoenix, Philadelphia. They are a relatively minor factor in some large metropolitan aggregates such as greater Houston and the DFW metroplex, but as for the cities themselves — not really. Consider that even in conservative Texas, the big urban political fight this season was whether Houston’s crusading lesbian mayor could subpoena church sermons as part of her campaign to pass a city law guaranteeing certain toilet privileges to men who pretend to be women. That bespeaks a certain battiness, to be sure, but it also suggests an operative political model that should not be that hard to beat: Houston, which is largely working-class and overwhelmingly non-white, rejected that ordinance by a wide margin.

    But if the GOP wishes to seriously get in the game in those cities, as Scott Walker, Rick Perry and Lois Lerner’s victims have all discovered, Republican mayoral candidates are going to have to be prepared to go to war against “the Deep State,” which will maintain the left’s entrenched power and free-flowing graft “by any means necessary,” to coin a phrase.
    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/220188/

  3. #3
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    51,003
    Thanks
    29569

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio
    If I want something in Cleveland and my city councilman will not give it to me, I can't hope to get it by contributing to the campaign of the GOP candidate who runs against him next time. Instead, I have to find a way to change my councilman's mind or another city government try to work around him.

    This motif KILLS good government. There is no transparency and all city transactions are essentially a free-flowing bribery scheme.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    51,003
    Thanks
    29569

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio
    One party rule is the best possible breeding ground for public corruption.


  5. #5
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    51,003
    Thanks
    29569

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio

  6. #6
    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
    Joined
    May 2012
    Posts
    58,136
    Thanks
    10590

    From
    By the wall
    I work with city officials all the time.

    What do you mean when you say corruption?

  7. #7
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    51,003
    Thanks
    29569

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Running a city is a tall order. The governments of large cities, especially, can be more complex and difficult to manage than entire countries. In addition to representing the residents they serve, local leaders must balance the public’s diverse interests with the city’s limited resources. Consequently, not everyone’s needs can or will be met. Leaders must carefully consider which services are most essential, which agencies’ budgets to cut or boost, whether and how high to raise taxes, among other important decisions that affect the daily lives of city dwellers.

    But how do we measure the effectiveness of local leadership? One way is by determining a city’s operating efficiency. In other words, we can learn how well city officials manage and spend public funds by comparing the quality of services residents receive against the city’s total budget.

    Using that approach, WalletHub’s analysts compared the operating efficiency of 150 of the largest U.S. cities to reveal which among them are managed best. More specifically, we constructed a “Quality of Services” score comprising 33 key performance indicators grouped into six service categories, which we then measured against the city’s per-capita budget. Read on for our findings, expert insight and a full description of our methodology.
    https://wallethub.com/edu/best-run-cities/22869/


  8. #8
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    51,003
    Thanks
    29569

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio
    The public corruption tends to lead to more and more violent, out of control police departments.


  9. #9
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    51,003
    Thanks
    29569

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio
    The quality of a police department is NOT tied to the characteristics of the community it serves.

    27% of U.S. police killings between January 2013 - June 2017 were committed by police departments of the 100 largest U.S. cities.

    Black people were 39% of people killed by these 100 police departments despite being only 21% of the population in their jurisdictions.

    Only 1 of the 100 largest city police departments did not kill anyone from Jan 2013 - Jun 2017 (Irvine, CA).

    48% of unarmed people killed by the 100 largest city police departments were black. These police departments killed unarmed black people at a rate 4 times higher than unarmed white people.

    Rates of violent crime in cities did not make it any more or less likely for police departments to kill people. For example, Buffalo and Newark police departments had low rates of police violence despite high crime rates while Spokane and Bakersfield had relatively low crime rates and high rates of police violence.
    https://mappingpoliceviolence.org/co...e-departments/

    If the community's characteristics are not inspiring police violence and crime, then what is?

    I think it is the corruption and opacity that one-party Democratic rule brings to cities they control.

Similar Threads

  1. Cities ignore federal law & form sanctuary cities. Can they ignore all federal laws?
    By TextDrivers R Killers in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 288
    Last Post: 30th July 2015, 08:00 AM
  2. Replies: 38
    Last Post: 31st January 2012, 05:29 AM
  3. Big Cities in America
    By TheHangingChad in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16th October 2010, 09:49 AM
  4. Cities Collapsing throughout the USA
    By michaelr in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 7th April 2009, 09:19 AM
  5. Top 100 Most Dangerous Cities in the U.S.
    By michaelr in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12th February 2009, 11:48 AM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed