Members banned from this thread: Dragonfly5


Page 2 of 20 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 193
Thanks Tree100Thanks

Thread: Americans Dumping Dangerous Pitbulls On Canada

  1. #11
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    16,083
    Thanks
    8670

    From
    USA
    Terriers are difficult breeds to train because they are smart and stubborn. I have two JRT's and it is constant correction...but they are small and manageable. Pit bulls are large, strong dogs and they need the right owner who has the time and patience to work with them. Most Pits I have known are just big babies. Sadly, most Pits do end up in the shelters because people can't handle them Terriers also need a lot of exercise. If you do not work them out they get into trouble out of boredom...same with all terriers. My little savages both attended Puppy Preschool and the oldest one's best friend in the class was a Pit. This Pit had a sad story, the owners rescued her and she was disabled when they got her. Someone threw her out of a moving car and the dog broke its back and left her to die on the side of the road. Sweetest dog in the class. It really isn't the breed, IMO, it is the training and the owners who do not know what they are doing with challenging breeds.
    Thanks from Blueneck and HenryPorter

  2. #12
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    51,003
    Thanks
    29569

    From
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Quote Originally Posted by Lemonade View Post
    I agree. I meant that they recommend this training for everyone adopting a dog, because most animals they adopt out have experienced some form of maltreatment so they can be more reactive.
    O, yes. We still have dog fighting here, and pitbull are popular with drug dealers.

    The problem is, they are so much more powerful than ordinary dogs. It's much less likely a child will survive an attack.

    I don't "blame the dog", but I don't want them in private homes here, either.

  3. #13
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    41,596
    Thanks
    26342

    From
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Back in the 1990s, I visited my uncle in California. His adult daughter was still living with him (don't ask), and she had a dog. I don't know dog breeds, but it was fairly large, and amazingly "fluffy." I could tell that she was investing hundreds of dollars of her father's money in grooming. I could put my hand into its fur, and my hand would disappear from sight before I reached the dog's skin. And the fur felt light as air.

    On the other hand, the dog was insane. You know how many dogs go ballistic when new people enter the house, and it takes a half-hour before the dog finally calms down? This wasn't one of those dogs. It was still bouncing around, barking, batshit crazy, an hour later. She put the dog in the kitchen and closed the door - and the dog spent the next hour barking and loudly hurling itself at the door repeatedly. When she told me that she'd been taking it to obedience school, I nearly choked on my drink.
    Thanks from boontito and Madeline

  4. #14
    Throbbing Member Missle Command Champion johnflesh's Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    18,657
    Thanks
    8755

    From
    Colorado
    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    Very often, the victims are neighbors or visitors. Banning this breed seems to me the only way to remove this terrible risk.
    Based on that statement and Djinn's post, I might have to agree with ya.
    Thanks from Madeline

  5. #15
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    16,083
    Thanks
    8670

    From
    USA
    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    Back in the 1990s, I visited my uncle in California. His adult daughter was still living with him (don't ask), and she had a dog. I don't know dog breeds, but it was fairly large, and amazingly "fluffy." I could tell that she was investing hundreds of dollars of her father's money in grooming. I could put my hand into its fur, and my hand would disappear from sight before I reached the dog's skin. And the fur felt light as air.

    On the other hand, the dog was insane. You know how many dogs go ballistic when new people enter the house, and it takes a half-hour before the dog finally calms down? This wasn't one of those dogs. It was still bouncing around, barking, batshit crazy, an hour later. She put the dog in the kitchen and closed the door - and the dog spent the next hour barking and loudly hurling itself at the door repeatedly. When she told me that she'd been taking it to obedience school, I nearly choked on my drink.
    My girls are doing this right now...except they hurl themselves into the arms of anyone who walks through the door. It is my fault, I started this because I thought it was cute at first. Now, I worry they will injure themselves because they literally fly through the air. One is only 10 pounds the other 13 pounds. I do two things to get them to stop and try to socialize them. I get a short leash and make them sit right next to me on the floor..with correction if they move and a treat if they "stay". The other thing is distracting them with a pigs ear. By the time they finish the ear, they are calm. Isolating them is the worse thing you can do...it feeds the behavior.

  6. #16
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,624
    Thanks
    366

    From
    Florida
    No doubt there are many perfectly friendly pit bulls but the breed has a strong tendency for aggressiveness in it's gene pool. Of course the blame lies with the people who intentionally bred the dogs for aggressiveness, and given time the gene pool could be culled, but as it stands I wouldn't want a pit bull on the block if I had small children. I like the working and sporting breeds that have been bred for specific tasks. They're intelligent, very trainable, and eager to please. It's amazing what behaviours are genetically instilled; I had a GSP who would absolutely vibrate with excitement on point when she saw a bird. I didn't train that; it was inborn instinct. Likewise Labs are people lovers. They just can't help themselves. It's really surprising that they were on the graph for fatal attacks, but they are large dogs and there are always some maladjusted individuals. With pitbulls though, aggressiveness is common, and instinctive.
    I'm on the fence though about outlawing an entire breed. Dog fighters will no doubt find some other breed to ruin.
    Thanks from Madeline

  7. #17
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,624
    Thanks
    366

    From
    Florida
    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    Back in the 1990s, I visited my uncle in California. His adult daughter was still living with him (don't ask), and she had a dog. I don't know dog breeds, but it was fairly large, and amazingly "fluffy." I could tell that she was investing hundreds of dollars of her father's money in grooming. I could put my hand into its fur, and my hand would disappear from sight before I reached the dog's skin. And the fur felt light as air.

    On the other hand, the dog was insane. You know how many dogs go ballistic when new people enter the house, and it takes a half-hour before the dog finally calms down? This wasn't one of those dogs. It was still bouncing around, barking, batshit crazy, an hour later. She put the dog in the kitchen and closed the door - and the dog spent the next hour barking and loudly hurling itself at the door repeatedly. When she told me that she'd been taking it to obedience school, I nearly choked on my drink.
    A chow possibly? They're fluffy, and they have the distinction of being the stupidest breed. The breed was developed for a certain appearance, and nothing else. While they don't show up on the list for fatal attacks they're implicated in way more than their share of non-fatal attacks, so they're both stupid and mean, a wonderful combination.

  8. #18
    No mercy for losers Addiction Solitaire Champion, Double Deuce Champion, Queen Jewels Champion, Ray Ray Shuffle Champion, Twins Champion, Blow Up: Arcade Champion, Bunch - Time Trial Champion, Znax Champion, Zoo Keeper Champion, Sobics School Champion, Swap a Smiley Champion, Makos Champion, Dino Drop Champion, Flower Frenzy Champion, Some Puzzle Champion, Funny Bubbles Champion, CubeZ Champion, Dinky Smash Champion, Fun Fun Animals Champion, Fruit Fabriek Champion, Raft Wars Champion, Rainbow Monkey RunDown Champion, Raft Wars Champion, Crime Puzzle Champion Blueneck's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    45,638
    Thanks
    22362

    From
    Ohio
    I watch Pit Bulls and Parolees a lot and the breed seems to be unfairly judged because of bad treatment by asshole owners. I sometimes wonder if the people shouldn't be put to sleep instead of the dogs.
    Thanks from HCProf and NeoVsMatrix

  9. #19
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    31,613
    Thanks
    29480

    From
    United States
    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    Pit bulls are large, strong dogs and they need the right owner who has the time and patience to work with them. Most Pits I have known are just big babies. Sadly, most Pits do end up in the shelters because people can't handle them.
    The problem with Pitt Bulls is not the owners, but the breed.

  10. #20
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    16,083
    Thanks
    8670

    From
    USA
    Quote Originally Posted by Otto Throttle View Post
    No doubt there are many perfectly friendly pit bulls but the breed has a strong tendency for aggressiveness in it's gene pool. Of course the blame lies with the people who intentionally bred the dogs for aggressiveness, and given time the gene pool could be culled, but as it stands I wouldn't want a pit bull on the block if I had small children. I like the working and sporting breeds that have been bred for specific tasks. They're intelligent, very trainable, and eager to please. It's amazing what behaviours are genetically instilled; I had a GSP who would absolutely vibrate with excitement on point when she saw a bird. I didn't train that; it was inborn instinct. Likewise Labs are people lovers. They just can't help themselves. It's really surprising that they were on the graph for fatal attacks, but they are large dogs and there are always some maladjusted individuals. With pitbulls though, aggressiveness is common, and instinctive.
    I'm on the fence though about outlawing an entire breed. Dog fighters will no doubt find some other breed to ruin.
    I think inbreeding might be a problem with aggressive dogs. The rule of thumb with breeding dogs is every 4th generation if breeding in the same blood line. Some might do it within 2 generations or less. I see this with hunting dogs...they breed them close to create better hunters. My JRT's came from hunting stock and my cousin gets a few bucks for these dogs with only 2 litters a year. One of mine has already caught a bird in mid air. She just jumped in the air when she saw it and caught it. I was traumatized. LOL GSP's are awesome dogs.

Page 2 of 20 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 110
    Last Post: 9th March 2017, 01:44 PM
  2. Replies: 28
    Last Post: 23rd August 2016, 05:56 PM
  3. Patient dumping
    By Dr Sampson Simpson in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 25th September 2013, 06:23 AM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed