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Thread: Claim : Alex jones sells "snake oil"

  1. #11
    Established Member NeoVsMatrix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmanmcfly View Post
    I've seen some claims concerning alex jones selling snake oil (among other claims).

    Since no arguments were made, I figure we could look at a recently published buzzfeed article where they tried to make that case. Unfortunately, they wound up writing a 3 page advertising campaign in favor of alex jones.

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/charliewarz...PLr#.vtQOmOLrx



    @Blues63
    remember how you did not specify an argument? Well, this is to counter one of the potential arguments you MIGHT have been trying to make but did not express.
    does the article / the tests also studied if those products have any - specifically the claimed - positive effect ?

    To have ingredients as advertised, is one thing.
    His price gauging (his products are usually much more expensive then comparable OTC products / vitamins / supplements) is one of the things that make him a snake oil salesman.

    Him selling product under the "pretense' that they will have a beneficial effect, which is not proven, is also something that makes him a snake oils salesman.

    both these points have not been addressed in the snippet you copied in your OP (didn't read the article.)

  2. #12
    Veteran Member bmanmcfly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    I don't think Jones has been accused of fraud for selling a product that isn't as advertised. He's been accused of scaring people with false threats and then selling them things that purport to protect them from those threats.

    This is a very old con. "Doctors" for centuries would do things to make "patients" worse, then offer to "treat" them...they they miraculously get better. In ancient times this was such a bad problem the Code of Hammurabi prescribes death as the punishment for doctors who can't do what they say they can.

    Frankly, the whole supplements game is a fraud. "These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease."
    I wish that was the argument that was made... but, it doesn't take ww3 or an economic collapse for the power to go out... and those not prepared if it does are the ones that will be plowing through the stores to grab the last bottles of water or cans of food, meanwhile, the ones that did prepare are not concerned.

    As far as supplements in general being a scam, the studies show that, if you are on deaths door and you take a shitty supplement, then you will not see any benefits. However, supplements definitely have an impact. bottom line, if what went in your stomach did not effect your body, then drinking a 40 oz of vodka wouldnt leave (most) people stumbling, slurring or worse.

  3. #13
    Veteran Member bmanmcfly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeoVsMatrix View Post
    does the article / the tests also studied if those products have any - specifically the claimed - positive effect ?

    To have ingredients as advertised, is one thing.
    His price gauging (his products are usually much more expensive then comparable OTC products / vitamins / supplements) is one of the things that make him a snake oil salesman.

    Him selling product under the "pretense' that they will have a beneficial effect, which is not proven, is also something that makes him a snake oils salesman.

    both these points have not been addressed in the snippet you copied in your OP (didn't read the article.)
    That wasn't part of the article one way or the other...

    As far as claims, like @Rassalas points out, there has to be great care in how things are phrased and all these disclaimers because, while supplements might be known to be associated with a positive outcome, if the FDA does not acknowledge that claim, then it cannot be claimed without the note somewhere saying that this is not a certified FDA claim.

    The thing is, so many of these "supplements" get synthesized in the lab and turned into a product (think tylenol).

  4. #14
    Veteran Member Dr Sampson Simpson's Avatar
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    Just proving what is in the bottle doesn't prove that what people try to claim it does actually works. All those herbal supplements that claim is helps lose weight, cures the cold, etc are like that. Yeah, test will show it has whaqt it says it has in it, but no clinical trials were done to prove it works. That's where the snake oil comes from.

    I should add, I have no idea what the particular stuff he is selling is. Does it make claims that it can do certain things without any test to prove it? If so, its snakeoil
    they're little more than overpriced and ineffective blends of vitamins and minerals that have been sold in stores for ages.
    The article itself in fact supports that it is snake oil.

  5. #15
    Galactic Ruler Spookycolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Sampson Simpson View Post
    Just proving what is in the bottle doesn't prove that what people try to claim it does actually works. All those herbal supplements that claim is helps lose weight, cures the cold, etc are like that. Yeah, test will show it has whaqt it says it has in it, but no clinical trials were done to prove it works. That's where the snake oil comes from.

    I should add, I have no idea what the particular stuff he is selling is. Does it make claims that it can do certain things without any test to prove it? If so, its snakeoil
    The article itself in fact supports that it is snake oil.
    I am fairly certain that whatever product Jones is pushing is only there to get money for him.

    I doubt that Rush sleeps on all the mattresses he pushes.

  6. #16
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    Just another way to bilk people out of their hard-earned money. Somebody like Alex Jones shouldn't be selling anything, because nobody should be listening to the shit he's spewing. Ever. If he wants to fleece the people who are stupid enough to listen to his shit and send him their money, why not? If not him, somebody else will do it. Maybe a prince from Uganda.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by splansing View Post
    Just another way to bilk people out of their hard-earned money. Somebody like Alex Jones shouldn't be selling anything, because nobody should be listening to the shit he's spewing. Ever. If he wants to fleece the people who are stupid enough to listen to his shit and send him their money, why not? If not him, somebody else will do it. Maybe a prince from Uganda.
    I don't think anyone is accusing him of breaking the law. Just because an activity is legal, does that mean no one else should object to it?

    BTW, tons of other people DO sell BS products making BS claims.
    Thanks from bmanmcfly

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    I am fairly certain that whatever product Jones is pushing is only there to get money for him.

    I doubt that Rush sleeps on all the mattresses he pushes.
    To be fair, the mattresses Limbaugh speaks for probably are really mattresses that conform to whatever claims he makes about them. Mattresses are subject to truth in advertising laws. Dietary supplements are not:
    The 1994 Dietary Supplements Health and Education Act effectively lets anyone sell medicine––so long as it’s not explicitly medicines, but ingestible non-food products that claim to improve health. More specifically, a product can’t be sold to treat or cure a specific disease, as pharmaceuticals are, but a supplement can claim to provide health, vitality, cardiovascular support, joint functionality, brain wellness, et cetera.
    Thanks from bmanmcfly

  9. #19
    Established Member NeoVsMatrix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmanmcfly View Post
    That wasn't part of the article one way or the other...

    As far as claims, like @Rassalas points out, there has to be great care in how things are phrased and all these disclaimers because, while supplements might be known to be associated with a positive outcome, if the FDA does not acknowledge that claim, then it cannot be claimed without the note somewhere saying that this is not a certified FDA claim.

    The thing is, so many of these "supplements" get synthesized in the lab and turned into a product (think tylenol).
    ok, so with that info from you.. i tried googling some info on it.. and was straight led back to your article.. so that claim is false in iteself...


    But just because the products' ingredients matched their labels doesn't mean they lived up to Jones' claims. Survival Shield X-2, for example, "is just plain iodine, the same stuff doctors used to pour on surfaces as a disinfectant," Labdoor's results read.

    When the company tested Anthroplex, which retails for $29.95, it found that there was so little zinc that "if you're extremely zinc deficient, the value...is not going to be significantly helpful." The report notes that "you could actually get another zinc orotate supplement for around $5 WITH an impactful serving size," before concluding simply that "this product is a waste of money."

    This claim — that the Infowars supplements often contained less effective serving sizes than their less expensive counterparts — was a running theme in Labdoor's results. In almost every example, Labdoor's tests and reviews describe the products as little more than heavily overpriced supplements with few health benefits, if any.
    So definitely in the OP article, BOTH topics HAVE been addressed.

    Verdict: He's a snake oil salesman, without looking any further as into your own OP.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    To be fair, the mattresses Limbaugh speaks for probably are really mattresses that conform to whatever claims he makes about them. Mattresses are subject to truth in advertising laws. Dietary supplements are not:
    Yeah, but still, listening to Rush is also a pretty good indicator a person is an idiot, too.

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