Page 4 of 14 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 138
Thanks Tree33Thanks

Thread: IQ tests and race versus OTHER

  1. #31
    Veteran Member bmanmcfly's Avatar
    Joined
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    19,632
    Thanks
    3056

    From
    C-A-N-A-D-A-Eh
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jeffrey View Post
    On the other hand, the LSAT tests the capacity to reason in three different areas - reading comprehension, analytical reasoning, and logical reasoning. And you can take classes to improve your score.
    Sure, but the military looks at IQ because they found that below a threshold, training was irrelevant and below that IQ, the person was a greater risk to the squad and that could not be remedied with training because they could not adequately conceptualize battlefield circumstances.
    Thanks from BigBob

  2. #32
    Veteran Member
    Joined
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    64,503
    Thanks
    36057

    From
    in my head
    Quote Originally Posted by NightSwimmer View Post
    Yeah... That sounds like a line from an action movie, but I do have to wonder just how the "big dogs" might think the concept should be implemented via public policy.
    The Bell Curve is all about what we should do for public policy. Advantage those who have much because they are productive, capable of social success, and empowering the smart is the best way to organize our society. As for those with low IQ, policy should be aimed at limiting the damage they do. Certainly we should not support them very well or encourage them to breed.

  3. #33
    Human Bean KnotaFrayed's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    14,456
    Thanks
    11937

    From
    Here
    Why not simply promote a thirst for knowledge/learning that is insatiable, setting as many human beings out on a quest to know as much as they can possibly know and how to look for and test, for the truth, not scores that pit them against anyone else? If we wish to use scores, make them available only to those who can improve upon them, the individuals to which they belong? If we're hung up on "being better", then why not challenge ourselves to be better, daily and make ourselves, our biggest and only, competitor? First though, a society needs to come to grips with a set of values, that are universal to that society (possibly all of humankind) so that members of society can determine and have some definition of what "being better" means.

    Seems some humans discovered long ago, that other people's knowledge dilutes the power of some to manipulate, control and exploit ignorance to keep themselves in power and enslave others.

    No human may be a perfect being, but there have been and are some, that recognize the importance of an informed and educated populace.

    Who would have thought that in the second half of the 2nd decade of the 21st century, the importance of an informed and educated public would become so blatantly obvious as the world sees some humans, yet again, as before, promoting ignorance, misinformation and a severe lack of basic thought, in order to assert their control over segments of the population if not wider segments, or only segments large enough to put themselves in power and retain power, by keeping, "just enough" people too ignorant to see the truth.


    "Enlighten the people generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like evil spirits at the dawn of day."
    Thomas Jefferson, letter to P. S. du Pont de Nemours (April 24, 1816); reported in Henry Augustine Washington, ed., The Writings of Thomas Jefferson: Being His Autobiography, Correspondence, Reports, Messages, Addresses, And Other Writings, Official and Private, Volume 5 (1854), p. 592. This sentence is one of many quotations inscribed on Cox Corridor II, a first floor House corridor, U.S. Capitol.

    "I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by education. This is the true corrective of abuses of constitutional power."
    Thomas Jefferson, letter to William Charles Jarvis, September 28, 1820. The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ed. Paul L. Ford, vol. 10 (1899), p. 161.

    "If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be. The functionaries of every government have propensities to command at will the liberty and property of their constituents. There is no safe deposit for these but with the people themselves; nor can they be safe with them without information. Where the press is free, and every man able to read, all is safe."
    Thomas Jefferson, letter to Colonel Charles Yancey, January 6, 1816. The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ed. Paul L. Ford, vol. 10 (1899), p. 4.


    I would also add that innovation comes from thinking OUTSIDE the box and that entails thinking in ways that do not necessarily fit into neat little boxes. Aptitude can be measured in all kinds of ways, but an infrequent sitting, to take a test that all others take, seems to fall short of measuring or including intelligence that exists, but is not measured, without a variety of tests and interaction.

    There seems to be a level of thinking that one might call "intuitive" where the mind processes information, situations, circumstances and connects dots in one easy fluid motion, eliminating a process of trial and error others engage in, to come to the same conclusions. I have met people that exhibit this, that come from all manner of educational backgrounds and formal educational training. It does not take long to recognize the type of intelligence these folks have and their capacity to solve situational problems much faster than others.
    Last edited by KnotaFrayed; 11th February 2018 at 06:26 PM.
    Thanks from BigBob

  4. #34
    Veteran Member Eve1's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    18,821
    Thanks
    12851

    From
    My own world
    @KnotaFrayed
    Interesting P#33 but this is intelligence as measured by IQ tests the topic of the OP is not the literacy of the general population.
    Last edited by Eve1; 11th February 2018 at 06:46 PM.

  5. #35
    Member
    Joined
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    2,895
    Thanks
    617

    From
    Florida
    Quote Originally Posted by KnotaFrayed View Post
    Why not simply promote a thirst for knowledge/learning that is insatiable, setting as many human beings out on a quest to know as much as they can possibly know and how to look for and test, for the truth, not scores that pit them against anyone else? If we wish to use scores, make them available only to those who can improve upon them, the individuals to which they belong? If we're hung up on "being better", then why not challenge ourselves to be better, daily and make ourselves, our biggest and only, competitor? First though, a society needs to come to grips with a set of values, that are universal to that society (possibly all of humankind) so that members of society can determine and have some definition of what "being better" means.

    Seems some humans discovered long ago, that other people's knowledge dilutes the power of some to manipulate, control and exploit ignorance to keep themselves in power and enslave others.

    No human may be a perfect being, but there have been and are some, that recognize the importance of an informed and educated populace.

    Who would have thought that in the second half of the 2nd decade of the 21st century, the importance of an informed and educated public would become so blatantly obvious as the world sees some humans, yet again, as before, promoting ignorance, misinformation and a severe lack of basic thought, in order to assert their control over segments of the population if not wider segments, or only segments large enough to put themselves in power and retain power, by keeping, "just enough" people too ignorant to see the truth.


    "Enlighten the people generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like evil spirits at the dawn of day."
    Thomas Jefferson, letter to P. S. du Pont de Nemours (April 24, 1816); reported in Henry Augustine Washington, ed., The Writings of Thomas Jefferson: Being His Autobiography, Correspondence, Reports, Messages, Addresses, And Other Writings, Official and Private, Volume 5 (1854), p. 592. This sentence is one of many quotations inscribed on Cox Corridor II, a first floor House corridor, U.S. Capitol.

    "I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by education. This is the true corrective of abuses of constitutional power."
    Thomas Jefferson, letter to William Charles Jarvis, September 28, 1820. The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ed. Paul L. Ford, vol. 10 (1899), p. 161.

    "If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be. The functionaries of every government have propensities to command at will the liberty and property of their constituents. There is no safe deposit for these but with the people themselves; nor can they be safe with them without information. Where the press is free, and every man able to read, all is safe."
    Thomas Jefferson, letter to Colonel Charles Yancey, January 6, 1816. The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ed. Paul L. Ford, vol. 10 (1899), p. 4.


    I would also add that innovation comes from thinking OUTSIDE the box and that entails thinking in ways that do not necessarily fit into neat little boxes. Aptitude can be measured in all kinds of ways, but an infrequent sitting, to take a test that all others take, seems to fall short of measuring or including intelligence that exists, but is not measured, without a variety of tests and interaction.

    There seems to be a level of thinking that one might call "intuitive" where the mind processes information, situations, circumstances and connects dots in one easy fluid motion, eliminating a process of trial and error others engage in, to come to the same conclusions. I have met people that exhibit this, that come from all manner of educational backgrounds and formal educational training. It does not take long to recognize the type of intelligence these folks have and their capacity to solve situational problems much faster than others.
    And that's why we've funded public education. Too bad that experiment has turned around and bit us.

  6. #36
    Veteran Member Eve1's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    18,821
    Thanks
    12851

    From
    My own world
    @Otto Throttle Public education is not the issue in this thread, if you want to start your own thread about it please go ahead. Personally I know for a fact some States have better public education systems than others and even within those States great differences exist between cities, towns and counties. When it really comes down to it, it's not just the quality of the public education system that is important, it's the parents, the family and the community and how much they all value educating children. For some its not even a small factor in their lives and for some it's the most important factor in their lives. For the rest of the population it falls somewhere in the middle.

  7. #37
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    61,030
    Thanks
    30269

    From
    Vulcan
    Quote Originally Posted by bmanmcfly View Post
    Sure, but the military looks at IQ because they found that below a threshold, training was irrelevant and below that IQ, the person was a greater risk to the squad and that could not be remedied with training because they could not adequately conceptualize battlefield circumstances.
    Of course, the LSAT is not a military test.
    Thanks from Friday13

  8. #38
    Veteran Member bmanmcfly's Avatar
    Joined
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    19,632
    Thanks
    3056

    From
    C-A-N-A-D-A-Eh
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jeffrey View Post
    Of course, the LSAT is not a military test.
    I didn't think so, although, even with LSAT, that even with training the boost a person can get isn't changed that drastically.

  9. #39
    New Member Slartibartfast's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    691
    Thanks
    243

    From
    UK
    EIQ is more important. It doesn't matter how intelligent they are, can they work and get along with others.

  10. #40
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    100,022
    Thanks
    7388

    From
    Vancouver
    If you proved beyond all shadow of a doubt, scientifically and with immaculate methodology, that white chubby French-Scottish Canadians in my neighbourhood we’re the least intelligent group of people on earth - I would STILL demand every right and privilege to be judged on my personal actions, behaviour and abilities ... not lumped in together somehow as a living proxy for the sum average of people who look like me.
    Thanks from Rasselas and BigBob

Page 4 of 14 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 21
    Last Post: 2nd August 2017, 05:28 PM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 24th November 2014, 12:22 PM
  3. Massachusetts Senate race tests feelings about Wall Street
    By Cicero in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 26th December 2011, 11:02 AM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 3rd November 2010, 07:54 AM
  5. The race!! Race!! Christ on a stick...
    By Robster Craw in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27th January 2008, 06:16 PM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed