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Thread: Southern Racist: Why they don't think they're racist

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    Southern Racist: Why they don't think they're racist

    Unless you were raised by well educated people, or carpetbaggers, or the rare Southern hippie, racism was something of a default mode in the South, so casual and ingrained that most of us didn't even realize that what we were saying was racist. I don't know what kids North of the Mason Dixon line called each other on the playground in the 80s and 90s, but in the small-town South, kids called each other "ni**er" and "fa**ot" as easy and as casually as kids might call each other "jerks" or "dum-dum heads." You didn't have cooties where I grew up, you had "ni**er" cooties," and the only names we took any real offense to were variations of "ni**er lover," the lowest of all insults, reserved for kids who insisted they were safe when clearly the ball reached first base before they did.

    The notion that my kids could say those words -- words my six year old has never even heard, and hopefully will not hear until he's studying the the Civil War and the Civil Rights era in high school -- seems appalling and repulsive to me, but that was not so in the schools I attended in the South. I don't remember ever hearing a teacher ask a student not to use those words, and there's no way they could've not heard them. But then, what were teachers going to do? Raise the issue with the parents, who taught the kids those words, who woud dismiss it? We knew the "N-word" in the South; it was the "R-word" that we'd never heard before: Racism.

    Read more at Paula Deen and Why So Many Southern Racists Don't Believe They're Actually Racists
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    The researchers' mathematical model suggests that of the seven states in the country with the highest percentage of people who are biased against black people, six are Southern states—Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina—required to seek federal approval for election law changes under the Voting Rights Act. Arizona and Alaska, the other two states required to get the feds' permission before changing their election laws, ranked much lower in anti-black bias. But as Elmendorf and Spencer note, these states are presumably required to seek that permission because of other bias—anti-Latino in Arizona and anti-Native American in Alaska—which their study did not measure. (Besides the eight states mentioned above, the VRA requires some counties and municipalities in seven other states to seek federal permission to change election rules.)

    The researchers crunched the data several different ways to make sure they were getting valid results. But "whichever approach you pick, the Deep South states are close to the top," Elmendorf says.
    This Study Said the South Is More Racist Than the North | Mother Jones
    Last edited by sky writer; 7th August 2013 at 07:28 PM.
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    the "good" prag pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sky writer View Post
    Unless you were raised by well educated people, or carpetbaggers, or the rare Southern hippie, racism was something of a default mode in the South, so casual and ingrained that most of us didn't even realize that what we were saying was racist. I don't know what kids North of the Mason Dixon line called each other on the playground in the 80s and 90s, but in the small-town South, kids called each other "ni**er" and "fa**ot" as easy and as casually as kids might call each other "jerks" or "dum-dum heads." You didn't have cooties where I grew up, you had "ni**er" cooties," and the only names we took any real offense to were variations of "ni**er lover," the lowest of all insults, reserved for kids who insisted they were safe when clearly the ball reached first base before they did.

    The notion that my kids could say those words -- words my six year old has never even heard, and hopefully will not hear until he's studying the the Civil War and the Civil Rights era in high school -- seems appalling and repulsive to me, but that was not so in the schools I attended in the South. I don't remember ever hearing a teacher ask a student not to use those words, and there's no way they could've not heard them. But then, what were teachers going to do? Raise the issue with the parents, who taught the kids those words, who woud dismiss it? We knew the "N-word" in the South; it was the "R-word" that we'd never heard before: Racism.

    Read more at Paula Deen and Why So Many Southern Racists Don't Believe They're Actually Racists
    Dustin Rowles citing/projecting his experiences growing up concludes/translates that Paula Dean must be a racist???

    Genuinely bizarre....

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    I'm more intrigued as to why liberals don't think they're racist, even though many of them say racist things and are seemingly obsessed with accusing others racism.

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    Join, or Die nonsqtr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mordent View Post
    I'm more intrigued as to why liberals don't think they're racist, even though many of them say racist things and are seemingly obsessed with accusing others racism.
    Yes. I keep trying to point this out. Racism means something specific. It does not equate with racial prejudice.
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    whitey me blightey Panzareta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sky writer View Post
    Unless you were raised by well educated people, or carpetbaggers, or the rare Southern hippie, racism was something of a default mode in the South, so casual and ingrained that most of us didn't even realize that what we were saying was racist. I don't know what kids North of the Mason Dixon line called each other on the playground in the 80s and 90s, but in the small-town South, kids called each other "ni**er" and "fa**ot" as easy and as casually as kids might call each other "jerks" or "dum-dum heads." You didn't have cooties where I grew up, you had "ni**er" cooties," and the only names we took any real offense to were variations of "ni**er lover," the lowest of all insults, reserved for kids who insisted they were safe when clearly the ball reached first base before they did.

    The notion that my kids could say those words -- words my six year old has never even heard, and hopefully will not hear until he's studying the the Civil War and the Civil Rights era in high school -- seems appalling and repulsive to me, but that was not so in the schools I attended in the South. I don't remember ever hearing a teacher ask a student not to use those words, and there's no way they could've not heard them. But then, what were teachers going to do? Raise the issue with the parents, who taught the kids those words, who woud dismiss it? We knew the "N-word" in the South; it was the "R-word" that we'd never heard before: Racism.

    Read more at Paula Deen and Why So Many Southern Racists Don't Believe They're Actually Racists
    A whole section of the political spectrum thinks it's their divinely inspired manifest destiny to lord it over the rest of world, so they see no racism, ethnocentrism or whateverism, whatsoever. Many prefer to think of it as heeding God's calling for which they will surely go to hell if they ignore.

    It's one of the ways the elites try to whip up anger among the lower classes.
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    whitey me blightey Panzareta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nonsqtr View Post
    Yes. I keep trying to point this out. Racism means something specific. It does not equate with racial prejudice.
    Most sources disagree with that statement.
    Last edited by Panzareta; 8th August 2013 at 07:47 AM.
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    Senior Member Canada - Geography game Champion, Geography Champion mtm1963's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sky writer View Post
    Unless you were raised by well educated people, or carpetbaggers, or the rare Southern hippie, racism was something of a default mode in the South, so casual and ingrained that most of us didn't even realize that what we were saying was racist. I don't know what kids North of the Mason Dixon line called each other on the playground in the 80s and 90s, but in the small-town South, kids called each other "ni**er" and "fa**ot" as easy and as casually as kids might call each other "jerks" or "dum-dum heads." You didn't have cooties where I grew up, you had "ni**er" cooties," and the only names we took any real offense to were variations of "ni**er lover," the lowest of all insults, reserved for kids who insisted they were safe when clearly the ball reached first base before they did.

    The notion that my kids could say those words -- words my six year old has never even heard, and hopefully will not hear until he's studying the the Civil War and the Civil Rights era in high school -- seems appalling and repulsive to me, but that was not so in the schools I attended in the South. I don't remember ever hearing a teacher ask a student not to use those words, and there's no way they could've not heard them. But then, what were teachers going to do? Raise the issue with the parents, who taught the kids those words, who woud dismiss it? We knew the "N-word" in the South; it was the "R-word" that we'd never heard before: Racism.

    Read more at Paula Deen and Why So Many Southern Racists Don't Believe They're Actually Racists
    using paula deen and the "n" word fails to show the OP's point.

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    Why do liberal terrorist think that only southern people are racist? I met blacks that are racist, Mexicans, Koreans and others from around the states and globe who were racist but the liberal terrorist somehow are always terrorizing the south and southerners.
    Thanks from Oscarb63 and Raoul_Duke

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    Senior Member Canada - Geography game Champion, Geography Champion mtm1963's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous View Post
    Why do liberal terrorist think that only southern people are racist? I met blacks that are racist, Mexicans, Koreans and others from around the states and globe who were racist but the liberal terrorist somehow are always terrorizing the south and southerners.
    it's the individual that's racist.
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