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Thread: Dinosaurs never roared

  1. #181
    Mad Genius For Hire Puzzling Evidence's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    I'm at the office and I can't find my headphones, but if you search YouTube for "turtles mating" - looking specifically for giant turtles - the noises they make are rather spectacular. I'll leave it to someone else to provide a link.
    Your porn habits are pretty disturbing....

  2. #182
    Anarquistador StanStill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Larrikin View Post
    Regardless of other roaring that may occur, roaring stentoriously isn’t the default behavior of most animals when warning rivals or contacting mates.

    You can’t superimpose mammals over quiet reptiles. Sure a lion may roar, but a saltwater crocodile does not. A bear may roar, but a Leatherback sea turtle does not. An elephant may trumpet loudly, but a Black caiman does not. A wolf may howl loudly, but a American alligator does not. A hippo may blast its horn loudly, but a giant tortoise does not. A gorilla can grunt loudly and bang its chest, but a green anaconda does not.
    Point being, that evolution clearly allows for animals with little to no threat of being eaten by predators the freedom to make loud noises to either intimidate others or call out to others from far away. Surely you agree that a hundred million years is enough time for such a capacity to evolve, right? Furthermore, most paleontologists see modern day birds as the most direct descendents of dinosaurs. Granted most birds are comparatively small, but can you imagine what a hawks screech would sound like if it were 15 tons?

  3. #183
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    maybe "roaring" is not the vocalizations correct term.

    We see that baby alligators call and adult gators bellow.

    Whether Dinos roared, called, vocalized ...or in some way made noises will never definitively be known.

  4. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by StanStill View Post
    Point being, that evolution clearly allows for animals with little to no threat of being eaten by predators the freedom to make loud noises to either intimidate others or call out to others from far away.
    Yes, I agree lions and bears have few predators, but that didn’t apply to dinosaurs. They all walked around with a sign that said ‘lunch’ on their backs, and another sign that said, “I must eat,” on their front. They were hatched from eggs (the largest being about the size of a large football), so they had a lot of growing to do. During all that time they can easily be snapped up by bigger dinos. Only the full grown giants were relatively safe, but even they were vulnerable when sick or injured. So being quiet was an extremely important thing to do. The other point is that most of those reptiles mentioned have existed all those millions of years for a reason. Being quiet works. If it’s not broke, don’t fix it, right?

    most paleontologists see modern day birds as the most direct descendents of dinosaurs. Granted most birds are comparatively small, but can you imagine what a hawks screech would sound like if it were 15 tons?
    Yes, birds are dinosaurs (avian reptiles), and can fly. I’ve made this point about seven or eight times in this thread. If you can fly you can make as much noise as you like. Non avian dinosaurs couldn’t fly, so if they bellowed or roared for no good reason, they’d soon be eaten by a bigger dino. “Roar” in reptilian language means “Come and eat me. I’m noisy, but delicious.”

  5. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by DebateDrone View Post
    maybe "roaring" is not the vocalizations correct term.
    That’s what movie makers and documentary makers have been using. Stentorian roaring. Exhibit one:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exjgqBBMBJQ

    In reality they would all have been silent. Why tell every other dinosaur in the jungle that you have lunch waiting for them?

    We see that baby alligators call and adult gators bellow.
    Quietly, yes. As I say, you’ll get small noises from reptiles on rare occasions. The great majority of the time you’ll get nothing but silence. The dinos we’re talking about can’t stop their stentorian roaring.

    Whether Dinos roared, called, vocalized ...or in some way made noises will never definitively be known.
    Not by you, but I have no doubt they made about as much noise as a cymbal under a mattress. I think they will eventually clone a dino from DNA and one of the first things they'll find is that they make very little noise.
    Last edited by Rob Larrikin; 26th October 2017 at 07:56 AM.

  6. #186
    Anarquistador StanStill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Larrikin View Post
    Yes, I agree lions and bears have few predators, but that didn’t apply to dinosaurs. They all walked around with a sign that said ‘lunch’ on their backs, and another sign that said, “I must eat,” on their front. They were hatched from eggs (the largest being about the size of a large football), so they had a lot of growing to do. During all that time they can easily be snapped up by bigger dinos. Only the full grown giants were relatively safe, but even they were vulnerable when sick or injured. So being quiet was an extremely important thing to do. The other point is that most of those reptiles mentioned have existed all those millions of years for a reason. Being quiet works. If it’s not broke, don’t fix it, right?



    Yes, birds are dinosaurs (avian reptiles), and can fly. I’ve made this point about seven or eight times in this thread. If you can fly you can make as much noise as you like. Non avian dinosaurs couldn’t fly, so if they bellowed or roared for no good reason, they’d soon be eaten by a bigger dino. “Roar” in reptilian language means “Come and eat me. I’m noisy, but delicious.”
    You speak dinosaur? That's incredible. So a T-Rex wouldn't roar to scare another dinosaur away from it's eggs or chicks? It's amazing that you figured that out just from "theorizing".

  7. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by StanStill View Post
    You speak dinosaur? That's incredible. So a T-Rex wouldn't roar to scare another dinosaur away from it's eggs or chicks? It's amazing that you figured that out just from "theorizing".
    Think about what youíre saying. There is a mound of leaves, twigs, grass and dirt, in which the eggs lay, incubating. You have a T-Rex somewhere nearby, and you have an animal big enough to dig those eggs up and try and eat them. If the egg thief is a dino then you know itís going to be looking everywhere all the time as birds do. It will peck a few times, then lift its head up and look in all directions. Do you know how hard it is to sneak up on such an animal? Then you have a nine ton T-Rex, presumably close enough to see the invader, and it begins charging. When a nine ton dinosaur starts running through the jungle, do you think an alert egg hunter isnít going to see it? Of course it will, and it will dash away with the T-Rex hot on its heels. Letís freeze frame the instant the T-Rex begins to run at the egg thief, which is about the same instant the egg thief begins to flee. Freeze frame there.

    https://fthmb.tqn.com/WR-oDEMMnlLj-6...a6e4c57c2f.jpg

    We have a picture of a nine ton T-Rex crashing through the vegetation towards the egg thief, and the egg thief already launching itself away in escape mode.

    Now, you say this is where you want to insert a roar at this time? Really?

    The T-Rex has a clutch of eggs, hidden under a mound of leaves, branches, twigs, grass and dirt. There are hundreds of predators around that would love those eggs. They would probably recognize the loud roar of an angry female T-Rex whose eggs were being attacked, if such a roar was commonly provided at such times. That would alert them to the location of the eggs.

    Shall we insert that ďdonít touch my eggs!Ē roar at this time? According to you, yes. Okay, so letís insert it. Roll the tape.

    The T-Rex continues its chase, and now we hear a deafening ďdonít touch my eggs!Ē roar from the T-Rex, telling egg thieves for miles around where her eggs are. Does this roar make the egg thief leave her mound any faster? No, because itís already well on its way, and rapidly escaping the area. No roar is going to alter that, or add to it. Does it help other egg thieves in the vicinity? You bet it does. As the T-Rex chases her egg thief, other egg thieves began making their way towards the roar, which they recognize as the kind given by an egg-laying mother T-Rex protecting her mound.

    Well done Stan. Youíve just put her eggs the top of the menu for 20 egg thieves, on their way to collect.

    Now rewind the tape back to our freeze-frame. How about we donít insert your roar this time? Roll the tape. The T-Rex continues to chase; the egg thief continues running away, and all the egg thieves in the vicinity hear nothing. No roar. Gee, how are they going to find eggs on this hungry Wednesday in Montana, 66 million years ago? I guess theyíll just have to keep creeping around sniffing and pecking, but they better do it quietly or they may get snapped up by an even bigger dino. Keeping quite is the name of the game, when youíre a reptile.

  8. #188
    Established Member NeoVsMatrix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Larrikin View Post
    That’s what movie makers and documentary makers have been using. Stentorian roaring. Exhibit one:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exjgqBBMBJQ

    In reality they would all have been silent. Why tell every other dinosaur in the jungle that you have lunch waiting for them?



    Quietly, yes. As I say, you’ll get small noises from reptiles on rare occasions. The great majority of the time you’ll get nothing but silence. The dinos we’re talking about can’t stop their stentorian roaring.



    Not by you, but I have no doubt they made about as much noise as a cymbal under a mattress. I think they will eventually clone a dino from DNA and one of the first things they'll find is that they make very little noise.
    Oh if only you were a dino...

  9. #189
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    After all this talk of dino eggs, I just had a couple myself, along with a strip of mammal flesh (bacon and eggs). It's morning here and the dinosaurs are tweeting all around.

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