Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
Thanks Tree9Thanks

Thread: Water from our Oceans is OLDER than the sun????????

  1. #1
    New Member Detective Mike Logan's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    995
    Thanks
    244

    From
    Hertfordshire, UK

    Water from our Oceans is OLDER than the sun????????

    WOW!

    Water on Earth is OLDER than the sun: Similarity between oceans and icy comets increases our chance of finding alien life | Daily Mail Online

    look at this article. it suggests that water from our oceans and icy comets is older than the solar system itself. VERY INTERESTING!!

    What are the implications of this?

    A) does it increase the chance of life elsewhere in the universe like the article suggests?

    B) what does it mean for life on earth aswell??
    Thanks from jackalope, Rorschach and Tedminator

  2. #2
    Miss Mock Out jackalope's Avatar
    Joined
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    51,139
    Thanks
    13049

    From
    Maine
    Lead author Ilsedore Cleeves, from the University of Michigen, said: 'The implication of these findings is that some of the solar system's water must have been inherited from the sun's birth environment, and thus pre-date the sun itself.
    'If our solar system's formation was typical, this implies that water is a common ingredient during the formation of all planetary systems.
    To date, the Kepler satellite has detected nearly 1,000 confirmed extrasolar planets.
    'The widespread availability of water during the planet-formation process puts a promising outlook on the prevalence of life throughout the galaxy.


    Read more: Water on Earth is OLDER than the sun: Similarity between oceans and icy comets increases our chance of finding alien life | Daily Mail Online
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
    yup pretty interesting

  3. #3
    Veteran Member Dangermouse's Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    24,602
    Thanks
    23339

    From
    Sunny Bournemouth, Dorset
    Here's how the elements came to be. Hydrogen and Oxygen happened early in the process, but the sun is relatively new.

    BBC - Learning Zone Class Clips - How are elements made? - Science Video
    Thanks from mrmike, Tedminator and bobgnote

  4. #4
    Banned Camp
    Joined
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    53,875
    Thanks
    19117

    From
    america
    Sounds Crazy, doesn't it?

    But, it seems to me that the common consensus now, is that Water is fairly common in the Universe. (OR, at least in our corner of it.)

    Stars, of course, have to ignite and burn. As such, they have a literal "beginning and end...."

    Water, on the other hand, ony changes form, based on outside influences, such as heat and pressure. (It does not require "Fusion" or "Fission" in order to exist, as does a star.)

    Still, I can see how this is a difficult concept to wrap one's head around, as the Sun is THE most important thing in our solar system.....
    Thanks from Caidh Mor

  5. #5
    Veteran Member
    Joined
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    14,785
    Thanks
    9578

    From
    SoCal
    Deuterium is a by product of the Big Bang. Its presence in Earth's water molecules reflects its extra-solar system source. That's why it's found in water trapped in comets too. In short, all water in the universe will contain deuterium dated to ~14 billion years -- the time of the big bang.

    Interesting OP and thread.
    Last edited by ARMCX1; 26th September 2014 at 12:13 PM.

  6. #6
    Member Robert Urbanek's Avatar
    Joined
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    3,383
    Thanks
    1442

    From
    Vacaville, CA
    Maybe we'll have to rename The Big Bang the Great Big Sprinkler System.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
    Joined
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    14,785
    Thanks
    9578

    From
    SoCal
    Boffins: 'Significant fraction of Earth's water PREDATES SUN and SOLAR SYSTEM'

    But we're still in the dark about how it rained down on us

    Scientists believe that some water molecules found on this planet are older than Earth, the solar system and even the Sun.

    According to new research led by astro boffin Ilse Cleeves at the University of Michigan, a "significant fraction" of the big drink was created more than 4.5 billion years ago.

    The study, published in Science magazine, opens up the idea that water may be found elsewhere in the universe. And, where there's water, there is life.

    It's been theorised that water molecules in comet ices and terrestrial oceans first arrived in the planet-forming disk of dust and gas that travelled around the Sun some 4.6 billion years ago.

    But scientists have also questioned whether water could have appeared at an even earlier stage than that.

    According to Cleeves, anything between 30 and 50 per cent came from the molecular cloud, making it about one million years older than the solar system.

    The University of Michigan's professor of astronomy Ted Bergin worked with Cleeves to simulate the chemistry that was sparked as the solar system was born. They looked at commonly-used water and a heavier version. Bergin said:

    Chemistry tells us that Earth received a contribution of water from some source that was very cold - only tens of degrees above absolute zero, while the Sun, being substantially hotter, has erased this deuterium, or heavy water, fingerprint.

    "We let the chemistry evolve for a million years - the typical lifetime of a planet-forming disk - and we found that chemical processes in the disk were inefficient at making heavy water throughout the solar system," Cleeves added. "What this implies is if the planetary disk didn't make the water, it inherited it. Consequently, some fraction of the water in our solar system predates the sun."

    She said that the implications of the findings were "pretty exciting."

    If water formation had been a local process that occurs in individual stellar systems, the amount of water and other important chemical ingredients necessary for the formation of life might vary from system to system. But because some of the chemically rich ices from the molecular cloud are directly inherited, young planetary systems have access to these important ingredients.

    Bergin said that the simulations showed that "the formation of water from hydrogen and oxygen atoms is a ubiquitous component of the early stages of stellar birth."

    He added: "It is this water, which we know from astronomical observations forms at only 10 degrees above absolute zero before the birth of the star, that is provided to nascent stellar systems everywhere." ®
    Boffins: 'Significant fraction of Earth's water PREDATES SUN and SOLAR SYSTEM' ? The Register

  8. #8
    New Member Detective Mike Logan's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    995
    Thanks
    244

    From
    Hertfordshire, UK
    so where does this water come from? inter stellar comets OR ice crystals within the nebula within which we were formed?

    actually on that note- I wonder if scientists would ever be able to "track" the nebula within which we were formed?? I know its obviously disappeared but maybe some ridiculously advanced quantum computer simulations could figure out our "sister stars" and where abouts in the galaxy they are?? just a theory??
    Thanks from BruceTLaney

  9. #9
    Banned Camp
    Joined
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    76,560
    Thanks
    5476

    From
    Richmond Va
    Wut?
    Wait, water came from baby jesus' tears.
    Thanks from Dangermouse

  10. #10
    Established Member bobgnote's Avatar
    Joined
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,830
    Thanks
    90

    From
    A bad place to be, HELL is not . . .

    What changed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Detective Mike Logan View Post
    WOW!

    Water on Earth is OLDER than the sun: Similarity between oceans and icy comets increases our chance of finding alien life | Daily Mail Online

    look at this article. it suggests that water from our oceans and icy comets is older than the solar system itself. VERY INTERESTING!!

    What are the implications of this?

    A) does it increase the chance of life elsewhere in the universe like the article suggests?

    B) what does it mean for life on earth aswell??
    A) What increased the chance, of life, on any planets, at all is supernovae, which fused all the complex elements.

    B) Psst! S-U-P-E-R-N-O-V-A-E!

    And Earth survived a planetary collision, so our core has more iron, than it should, and there's a single moon, sloshing the tides and stuff, all over the place, while stabilizing the Earth's movements, particularly.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. how Obama closed the oceans
    By yuri zhivago in forum Current Events
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 6th October 2013, 03:06 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 17th August 2013, 10:33 AM
  3. Fishless oceans by 2050?
    By (I) Doomsday in forum Conspiracy Theories
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 11th April 2011, 06:30 PM
  4. The Oceans Are Dying
    By FatFreddy in forum Science and Technology
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10th April 2011, 01:53 AM
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29th November 2007, 07:27 AM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed