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Thread: Plyscrapers

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    RNG
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    Plyscrapers

    The somewhat playful pun about wooden skyscrapers is a bit of hyperbole at this point depending on your definition of skyscraper, but this article about building tall buildings out of wood is very interesting IMO. It's a bit long so I will just post the link.

    Worth the read I think.

    BBC - Future - ?Plyscrapers?: The rise of the wooden skyscraper

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    quichierbichen
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    The article says a lot about fire, but what about the real danger for wood these days? Water.

    The article points out that most wood used in construction today isn't timbers cut into boards (which are strong and light) but varieties of particleboard, pieces of wood glued together. That stuff's really strong (and heavier) but boy don't get it wet. Your article doesn't speak to this at all.
    Thanks from bajisima

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    RNG
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    The article says a lot about fire, but what about the real danger for wood these days? Water.

    The article points out that most wood used in construction today isn't timbers cut into boards (which are strong and light) but varieties of particleboard, pieces of wood glued together. That stuff's really strong (and heavier) but boy don't get it wet. Your article doesn't speak to this at all.
    Actually, it talks about the need for keeping water away quite a lot. And that is true of plain lumber too.

    BTW, the new laminates they are talking about are a long way from the OSB you are used to.

    https://www.apawood.org/cross-laminated-timber

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    RNG
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    @Rasselas I think your clicky finger must have spasmed. See post #4

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    quichierbichen
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    Quote Originally Posted by RNG View Post
    @Rasselas I think your clicky finger must have spasmed. See post #4
    My bad. Deleted.

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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    The article says a lot about fire, but what about the real danger for wood these days? Water.

    The article points out that most wood used in construction today isn't timbers cut into boards (which are strong and light) but varieties of particleboard, pieces of wood glued together. That stuff's really strong (and heavier) but boy don't get it wet. Your article doesn't speak to this at all.
    Many cities refuse to even allow wood to be used as frames in large buildings. This would never pass their building codes. Mold issue would be astounding and largely difficult to constantly stay on top of.

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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RNG View Post
    Actually, it talks about the need for keeping water away quite a lot. And that is true of plain lumber too.

    BTW, the new laminates they are talking about are a long way from the OSB you are used to.

    https://www.apawood.org/cross-laminated-timber
    Would it pass strict environmental standards? Some reasons we got away from wood office buildings weren't just fire or water but wood was considered bad for the environment. Needing so many trees and the adhesives used etc.

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    RNG
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Many cities refuse to even allow wood to be used as frames in large buildings. This would never pass their building codes. Mold issue would be astounding and largely difficult to constantly stay on top of.
    Why any more than conventional wood frame three story houses? Four floor apartments are the norm here in the Vancouver area because of the cost of earthquake resistant building of anything taller or made of concrete or iron/steel.

    And this is a very humid rainy environment.

    Current codes were written before the invention of these new materials. They can easily be changed.

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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RNG View Post
    Why any more than conventional wood frame three story houses? Four floor apartments are the norm here in the Vancouver area because of the cost of earthquake resistant building of anything taller or made of concrete or iron/steel.

    And this is a very humid rainy environment.

    Current codes were written before the invention of these new materials. They can easily be changed.
    Around here most codes for buildings larger than 3 stories or commercial, they need a steel frame. Fire codes, water damage, insects, hurricane and snow loads are normally cited as reasons. Some people now are building new one family homes with a metal roof, steel frame and such. Far less expensive for home insurance as well. New England has tons of old wooden buildings and they normally all came down in a shorter period of time than metal. Of course here on the East Coast, the original reasoning was the steel unions. They helped get a lot of codes written.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasselas View Post
    The article says a lot about fire, but what about the real danger for wood these days? Water.

    The article points out that most wood used in construction today isn't timbers cut into boards (which are strong and light) but varieties of particleboard, pieces of wood glued together. That stuff's really strong (and heavier) but boy don't get it wet. Your article doesn't speak to this at all.
    termites. those little critters are the real ankle breaker

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