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Thread: Protecting Your Environment

  1. #1
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Arrow Protecting Your Environment

    You might not feel you can do much to add or detract from the health of Planet Earth and those dwelling on it, but in fact, you can deeply impact your own personal micro-environment.

    Your home. Your yard. Your block. Maybe even your neighborhood, if you are of a community activism-type bent. Most of us will do right by our personal air, soil, etc.

    If we know how.

    So, to start us off, I recommend to you the Gardens Alive Co., of Lawrenceburg, Indiana.

    Their catalog is stuffed full of great ideas for driving deer away, for eliminating harmful creatures by introducing beneficial insects, etc.

    I have only ever heard of a few of their products, but of those, their prices are very competitive and their claims of effectiveness are realistic.

    I will be buying ladybugs shortly. Mostly because I love ladybugs; at this point, I don't grow much edible plant life.

    I will also try other of their products. My brother's grandchildren love to play on his big backyard's lawn, so eliminating harmful chemicals whilst still eliminating harmful insects, miles, deer, etc. should interest him.

    I don't work for this company! Doubtless, there are others like it, selling to ever-larger markets for "organic" food, flowers, lawns, etc.

    Your thoughts?
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  2. #2
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    I think all states probably have, or will have similar stores.

    Going green is a good thing.

    The movement is growing.
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  3. #3
    New Member BigBob's Avatar
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    Living in California by the bay I grew up recycling everything possible. There are all kinds of good animals and no bad ones where i live in Hayward. Solar and compost are about all I can do now.
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  4. #4
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBob View Post
    Living in California by the bay I grew up recycling everything possible. There are all kinds of good animals and no bad ones where i live in Hayward. Solar and compost are about all I can do now.
    Recycling is vitally important, absolutely, and my city has a seriously dedicated program. At least on my end; what happens at the recycling center might could be a suboptimal result.

    But it is also important not to consume in such a way that recycling is necessary. I have tried to resume the kitchen habits of my grandmother, using dish towels, wash cloths, etc. I changed my cleaning products.

    Chemically based cleaning products are so toxic, as a source of indoor air pollution, they can actually kill.

    Google "sick house syndrome".

    The nice thing is, natural cleaners are cheaper and work better!

  5. #5
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    I can recommend a few Pinterest boards on this topic.

    But please don't BUY natural cleaning products. Proctor & Gamble might well sell you a borax-based laundry detergent, but it has still been manufactured, transported, etc.

    All you need is a few containers and the ingredients, and you can make your own laundry detergent, etc., at home.
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  6. #6
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miller47 View Post
    I think all states probably have, or will have similar stores.

    Going green is a good thing.

    The movement is growing.
    It offers me financial security, too. My home will be paid off soon and I am comfortable, but I remember the gas crisis, inflation, etc. of the 1970's.

    Knowing my utilities costs are never going to become oppressive in future is a blessing.

    And too, I want clean water. I doubt I have that now, and might not be able to use tap water even to water the grass in future.

    Cleveland, like most of the Rust Belt, has the worst future as to water quality of anywhere in the country, IMO.

    But I can't just use rainwater. There's too much air pollution here. The solution will have to involve some filtration. Spendy!

    But what's the better option?
    Last edited by Madeline; 8th March 2018 at 09:52 PM.

  7. #7
    New Member Slartibartfast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miller47 View Post
    I think all states probably have, or will have similar stores.

    Going green is a good thing.

    The movement is growing.
    How did we go un-green!! I remember many meat and food products were bought in grease proof paper and paper bags. Milk was delivered in glass bottles that were returned and washed out. Pop (soda) were in glass bottles that had a refundable deposit.

    The people aren't un-green but it's the manufacturers and retailers. If you passed a law that told manufacturers that all products must be in paper, cardboard and glass from say by 2050, then everyone will be green from 2050.

    As I drive around in the UK, the sides of the road and hedges are full of litter; cans, bottles and plastic.
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  8. #8
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slartibartfast View Post
    How did we go un-green!! I remember many meat and food products were bought in grease proof paper and paper bags. Milk was delivered in glass bottles that were returned and washed out. Pop (soda) were in glass bottles that had a refundable deposit.

    The people aren't un-green but it's the manufacturers and retailers. If you passed a law that told manufacturers that all products must be in paper, cardboard and glass from say by 2050, then everyone will be green from 2050.

    As I drive around in the UK, the sides of the road and hedges are full of litter; cans, bottles and plastic.
    Every time anyone uses a Keurig single serving coffeemaker, God kills a kitten.

    Those things are an obscenity!

    And WTF convinced new parents that disposable diapers were the thing to do? 100xs more expensive than cloth, much more likely to irritate baby, and HIDEOUS.

    I had my daughter in 1978, and I could not believe the pressure to breastfeed, as if formula feeding was a form of child abuse.

    "Breast milk is natural. It's best for baby."

    Yet they also pressured me to use disposable diapers! HITF is this not cognitive dissonance?
    Last edited by Madeline; 11th March 2018 at 03:32 AM.

  9. #9
    Veteran Member Madeline's Avatar
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    I have other "environmental" worries that pertain to human behavior. Street crime, vandalism, heavy traffic, etc. I can't impact any of these issues alone, but I can if my block o'neighbors cooperates.

    There is a HUGE amount of funding available to do urban planning projects that aim to beautify and humanize an urban neighborhood, or you can offer local high school students a blank exterior wall to graphitti all they want.

    Loads of free or nearly free projects urban planning abound, and by following the directions of trained urban planners, you can avoid exasperating the crime problem by installing poorly-designed parks, etc.

    Just hanging house flags on 5 r 6 homes per block reduces the risk of crime, but even better is setting plants and art on street lights, etc. Shsred, public spaces that are beautified and creative have a predictable, observable positive impact on humans.

    Chainsawn sculptures from the stumps of trees that had to be taken down, e.g.
    Last edited by Madeline; 11th March 2018 at 03:56 AM.

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