Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 53
Thanks Tree47Thanks

Thread: Should humans be recycled?

  1. #41
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    62,618
    Thanks
    31319

    From
    Vulcan
    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    But..what if you are eating a Jewish person and their diet is Kosher? After all, you are what you eat.
    Boy, this has taken an ugly turn.... lol.
    Thanks from BigLeRoy

  2. #42
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    22,043
    Thanks
    11587

    From
    USA
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jeffrey View Post
    Boy, this has taken an ugly turn.... lol.

  3. #43
    ~Standing My Ground~ Sassy's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    45,117
    Thanks
    17879

    From
    God Bless Texas
    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    I agree 100%. I attended a funeral recently where the whole thing was 23K. To me, that was like throwing money into the ground. Funeral homes and directors will often take advantage of people during their most vulnerable moments to make a sale. It happened to my Dad, we were quoted 19K and my Dad pulled out his checkbook. I asked for other options and cremation with a service, Urn, and use of of room for a 1 day wake was 4500.00. Cremation was never mentioned by the funeral director..simply because he couldn't sell a casket, vault, head stones, etc. It really wasn't the money but the fact my Dad will need that money later on.
    Our family decided this a long time ago. My gma's funeral is the last funeral there will be for us. My mother pre-paid for cremation and they told me I had to go 'identify the body'. It turned out to be really nice. She was in a casket, in a beautiful room, it was a VIEWING. They let me stay as long as I wanted.

    For pets I wrestled with keeping the ashes and decided my friend's approach is the best one. Communal. I don't think the dead care, but when we imagine that they do, I think the different ideas about that are amusing. I said I think the cat wants to be here with me. My friend said oh my, I think they get lonely and want to be with the others! That works. And it's more practical. It's cheaper and how many boxes of pet ashes do I want to accumulate over the years?

  4. #44
    ~Standing My Ground~ Sassy's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    45,117
    Thanks
    17879

    From
    God Bless Texas
    Quote Originally Posted by Idiocracat View Post
    I thought this was a cool idea.

    The Living Urn



    I considered that but grief froze all decision making ability. I am told I can still do this with my mother's ashes. I don't see how it can be the same now.........

  5. #45
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    62,618
    Thanks
    31319

    From
    Vulcan
    Quote Originally Posted by Sassy View Post
    Our family decided this a long time ago. My gma's funeral is the last funeral there will be for us.
    I'm definitely getting buried. No becoming soylent green for me.

    Judaism 101: Life, Death and Mourning

    Both my parents were cremated, according to their own wishes. My father died before I became observant, and so my brother and I were in agreement. Not so with my mother, but while I brought it up I did not press the issue.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sassy View Post
    For pets I wrestled with keeping the ashes and decided my friend's approach is the best one. Communal. I don't think the dead care, but when we imagine that they do, I think the different ideas about that are amusing. I said I think the cat wants to be here with me. My friend said oh my, I think they get lonely and want to be with the others! That works. And it's more practical. It's cheaper and how many boxes of pet ashes do I want to accumulate over the years?
    I worry about this one. My cats are nearly 14 now, and you never know at this point.

  6. #46
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    22,043
    Thanks
    11587

    From
    USA
    Quote Originally Posted by Sassy View Post
    Our family decided this a long time ago. My gma's funeral is the last funeral there will be for us. My mother pre-paid for cremation and they told me I had to go 'identify the body'. It turned out to be really nice. She was in a casket, in a beautiful room, it was a VIEWING. They let me stay as long as I wanted.

    For pets I wrestled with keeping the ashes and decided my friend's approach is the best one. Communal. I don't think the dead care, but when we imagine that they do, I think the different ideas about that are amusing. I said I think the cat wants to be here with me. My friend said oh my, I think they get lonely and want to be with the others! That works. And it's more practical. It's cheaper and how many boxes of pet ashes do I want to accumulate over the years?
    My Mom was the first to be cremated in our immediate family and I took a little heat for it. It is the reason I don't speak to her sister, my Aunt from hell. She actually attacked me in the funeral home trying to lay this guilt trip on me. If I had not been medicated, it would have been a Jerry Springer scene. I told her it was best she leave right now...while she still can. We had a wake for her friends and family of one night. After the service, she was cremated. I think funerals are ghoulish, TBH. They are heart wrenching events that consist of a couple days of horrific sadness. The best ones are the celebration of life wakes. I attended a celebration of life for one of my friends Dad, who was a cop. It was awesome. He had a church service at the funeral home, full on bag pipes, etc. He was a member of the Moose Lodge and his celebration was held there. All of the cops took turns telling stories about him and it was laughter through tears. My Dad has already arranged his cremation and we bought a large urn so his ashes could join my Mom's. He wanted to be with her. I will do a celebration of life for him.

    When my little gentleman died, dog. He died in January, so we really did not have a choice except cremation. He has a little wooden box and they did a paw print in clay. He died in my arms on the way to the emergency vet at 4:00 am. Worst day of my life. My Mom's death ripped out my heart but my little gentleman ripped out my soul.

  7. #47
    Member
    Joined
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3,193
    Thanks
    2100

    From
    Switzerland
    In an inheritance case where 2 sisters were fighting each other, I saw the moment when they would share the ashes of their mother…. It did not happen but we were close to it. Each one wanted to have the ashers buried in each of their respective gardens. Human nature can be surprising !

  8. #48
    Member
    Joined
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3,193
    Thanks
    2100

    From
    Switzerland
    but anyway these 2 sisters spent more energy in court, than whatever energy was needed for their mother's cremation.

  9. #49
    Banned Camp
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    21,866
    Thanks
    12122

    I like that idea. I was going with cremation for me, but this is a better idea. It's such a complete waste to bury people, the ridiculous waste of land, money for caskets, etc.

  10. #50
    Master political analyst Dittohead not!'s Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    12,041
    Thanks
    6170

    From
    The formerly great golden state
    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    Interesting read..Thoughts?

    Mary Farrar was raised Anglican, and growing up, she got used to the idea that when someone dies, they were to be embalmed, placed in a casket and lowered into a brick or concrete grave vault.

    But when it came time for the 77-year-old to think about burying her husband, Edward, the old ways no longer felt natural.

    She had heard from a neighbour about the concept of a green burial. No embalming fluid. No fancy casket. The body would go directly into the ground. It made sense. Mary purchased a burial plot for Edward at Cobourg Union Cemetery, a two-hour drive west and one of the few places in Canada to offer such a service. She also bought a cotton shroud in which his body will be wrapped.

    Farrar is part of a small but growing movement of people who for ecological, spiritual or financial reasons are seeking body disposal methods that are more environmentally sound. In so doing, they are fulfilling the idea that the human body was meant to return to nature to be recycled, if you will.

    Greater awareness of the environmental costs of conventional funerals is leading some scientists to explore ways of recycling our bodies beyond green burials. The idea may be distasteful to some, but in light of an increasingly crowded, contaminated planet, others see it as a responsible, practical and fitting final act.

    https://newsinteractives.cbc.ca/long...reen-recycling
    Such a "green" burial could result in spreading diseases. Otherwise, it seems like a good idea. I've already said I want to be cremated, and if my survivors buy a fancy casket just to bury it in the ground, I'll come back and haunt them. I will, too.
    Thanks from bajisima

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. do EARTH-humans &'star wars-humans' share a common genesis?
    By Detective Mike Logan in forum Science and Technology
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 20th December 2016, 12:53 PM
  2. Not new, just recycled!
    By sky writer in forum New Users
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 16th April 2013, 07:50 AM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed