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Thread: Should humans be recycled?

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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Should humans be recycled?

    Interesting read..Thoughts?

    Mary Farrar was raised Anglican, and growing up, she got used to the idea that when someone dies, they were to be embalmed, placed in a casket and lowered into a brick or concrete grave vault.

    But when it came time for the 77-year-old to think about burying her husband, Edward, the old ways no longer felt natural.

    She had heard from a neighbour about the concept of a green burial. No embalming fluid. No fancy casket. The body would go directly into the ground. It made sense. Mary purchased a burial plot for Edward at Cobourg Union Cemetery, a two-hour drive west and one of the few places in Canada to offer such a service. She also bought a cotton shroud in which his body will be wrapped.

    Farrar is part of a small but growing movement of people who for ecological, spiritual or financial reasons are seeking body disposal methods that are more environmentally sound. In so doing, they are fulfilling the idea that the human body was meant to return to nature — to be recycled, if you will.

    Greater awareness of the environmental costs of conventional funerals is leading some scientists to explore ways of recycling our bodies beyond green burials. The idea may be distasteful to some, but in light of an increasingly crowded, contaminated planet, others see it as a responsible, practical and fitting final act.

    https://newsinteractives.cbc.ca/long...reen-recycling

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    Anarquistador StanStill's Avatar
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    I'm all for it. The last thing I want to do is be filled with formaldehyde or even worse, burned. All that energy in my cells that could be consumed by worms and roots just completely incinerated and kept in an urn? To each his own of course, but I always liked the phrase "pushing up daisies".
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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StanStill View Post
    I'm all for it. The last thing I want to do is be filled with formaldehyde or even worse, burned. All that energy in my cells that could be consumed by worms and roots just completely incinerated and kept in an urn? To each his own of course, but I always liked the phrase "pushing up daisies".
    It does make more sense. Although I do wonder about chemo patients that are full of meds when they die? Does it break down or will it contaminate water and food supplies?
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    Anarquistador StanStill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    It does make more sense. Although I do wonder about chemo patients that are full of meds when they die? Does it break down or will it contaminate water and food supplies?
    Fair point, but I can't imagine it comes anywhere close to having your blood vessels filled with formaldehyde.
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    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StanStill View Post
    Fair point, but I can't imagine it comes anywhere close to having your blood vessels filled with formaldehyde.
    True but then one is in a sealed casket. So I doubt much gets out. Wrapping someone and putting them directly in the ground could cause all sorts of issues. They claim people flush meds when they are done with them and that is causing contamination.

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    Anarquistador StanStill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    True but then one is in a sealed casket. So I doubt much gets out. Wrapping someone and putting them directly in the ground could cause all sorts of issues. They claim people flush meds when they are done with them and that is causing contamination.
    Still think it would be negligible, unless the person has an entire bottle of meds in their system when they die (which unfortunately, some do). I have heard that about disposed medications though—there was recently a medication disposal day in our area (maybe that was nationwide).

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    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bajisima View Post
    True but then one is in a sealed casket. So I doubt much gets out. Wrapping someone and putting them directly in the ground could cause all sorts of issues. They claim people flush meds when they are done with them and that is causing contamination.
    Other than the casket, you purchase a steel vault for the casket. I would be concerned about diseases, such as AIDS. Remember the Ebola crisis, it was unsafe to bury the bodies and they burned them. Some were digging up the bodies of loved ones to transport them closer to home.

    I have read some articles where burning dead bodies creates energy.

    Burning deceased humans will produce electricity - Technology & science - Science - LiveScience | NBC News

    Ebola Victims Burned, Not Buried, in Liberia | Time
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    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    Other than the casket, you purchase a steel vault for the casket. I would be concerned about diseases, such as AIDS. Remember the Ebola crisis, it was unsafe to bury the bodies and they burned them. Some were digging up the bodies of loved ones to transport them closer to home. ...
    The concern is overblown. In ideal room-temperature conditions, Ebola can survive outside a living body for about 14 days - tops. The AIDS virus can survive for about six days. And in both cases, the viruses are greatly weakened long before they die.

    That all said, cremation is a much better idea. It does NOT create energy; in fact it requires a lot of energy to reduce 150 lbs of matter to ash - especially when it's 60% water. But the idea of paying for a plot of land and a headstone is folly IMO.

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    New Member TNHarley's Avatar
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    Sounds cool to me.
    I just want to be ashes though.

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    Anarquistador StanStill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    The concern is overblown. In ideal room-temperature conditions, Ebola can survive outside a living body for about 14 days - tops. The AIDS virus can survive for about six days. And in both cases, the viruses are greatly weakened long before they die.

    That all said, cremation is a much better idea. It does NOT create energy; in fact it requires a lot of energy to reduce 150 lbs of matter to ash - especially when it's 60% water. But the idea of paying for a plot of land and a headstone is folly IMO.
    Well that was my point about cremation. It's wasteful. Waste of energy and perfectly good worm food.

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