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Thread: Overtourism

  1. #21
    Somewhere else GoaTlOver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpicturetaker12 View Post
    There are approx. 80,000,000 tourists that come to the US each year. I'm sure 79mil are in Orlando and Disney during my 2-3 visits I have to make each year. I'm sure of it! And 78mil are on I-4.

    PS. Last year was the FIRST YEAR since 2009 (when the world markets cratered) that we have had a dip in tourism in the US. The Trump effect!
    Those 79,000,000 need to find out that America is a big beautiful nation with plenty of great spots in the middle too.

  2. #22
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoaTlOver View Post
    Those 79,000,000 need to find out that America is a big beautiful nation with plenty of great spots in the middle too.
    National Parks.

  3. #23
    Praguematic Helena's Avatar
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    Maybe my user title will provide a clue.
    Paradise News by David Lodge is a (very good) novel that takes place in Hawaii and is written almost entirely from the perspective(s) of a tourist / various tourists, and tourism as a phenomenon is one of its topics. There is an academic character, an anthropologist specialising in tourism, and he has a theory that "tourism is the new world religion." Christians, Hindus, Muslims, Jews, Buddhists, atheists - "they all share the same belief that it is important to see the Parthenon, or the Sistine Chapel, or the Eifffel Tower." He also believes that most people don't REALLY want to travel and see those things, they have just been brainwashed to believe it will make them happy.
    Thanks from Robert Urbanek

  4. #24
    Nuisance Factor Yeti 8 Jungle Swing Champion, YetiSports 4 - Albatross Overload Champion, YetiSports7 - Snowboard FreeRide Champion, Alu`s Revenge Champion boontito's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    Paradise News by David Lodge is a (very good) novel that takes place in Hawaii and is written almost entirely from the perspective(s) of a tourist / various tourists, and tourism as a phenomenon is one of its topics. There is an academic character, an anthropologist specialising in tourism, and he has a theory that "tourism is the new world religion." Christians, Hindus, Muslims, Jews, Buddhists, atheists - "they all share the same belief that it is important to see the Parthenon, or the Sistine Chapel, or the Eifffel Tower." He also believes that most people don't REALLY want to travel and see those things, they have just been brainwashed to believe it will make them happy.
    Re: the bold

    Completely true. For some of us, it takes a few visits to realize it though, as well as some time away from the recently seen wonder of the world. I much prefer semi-local destinations these days. Places I can get to within a couple of hours.

  5. #25
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boontito View Post
    Re: the bold

    Completely true. For some of us, it takes a few visits to realize it though, as well as some time away from the recently seen wonder of the world. I much prefer semi-local destinations these days. Places I can get to within a couple of hours.
    Depends. There are places in the world I would like to see, but I'm more of a geography person in that respect. I.e., I want to see the places, less concerned about the things there. E.g., NZ (and probably Australia as well, while I'm in that neighborhood anyway), Finland, Norway, AK ... those are what come immediately to mind, anyway, and not in any particular order.

  6. #26
    Nuisance Factor Yeti 8 Jungle Swing Champion, YetiSports 4 - Albatross Overload Champion, YetiSports7 - Snowboard FreeRide Champion, Alu`s Revenge Champion boontito's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jeffrey View Post
    Depends. There are places in the world I would like to see, but I'm more of a geography person in that respect. I.e., I want to see the places, less concerned about the things there. E.g., NZ (and probably Australia as well, while I'm in that neighborhood anyway), Finland, Norway, AK ... those are what come immediately to mind, anyway, and not in any particular order.
    I get that. There are places I'd still love to see. As I've aged though I've lost more and more patience with the process of getting there. Lately, spending a couple hours getting somewhere seems so much more enticing than spending 2+ days getting somewhere. Especially if the total amount of time off doesn't change between those two scenarios.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    Those are very good points and I agree, but my own selfish perspective is that of a native and permanent resident of one of the prime tourist spots. I can't (and don't want to) move away for the tourist season, which is most of the year here anyway. I have more thoughts (and feelings ) about this but not enough time to write a coherent post right now.
    I spent my high school years in Maine, which is known as "Vacationland." Complaining about the tourists was practically the state pastime. Since the infrastructure was built out to accommodate about 1.5 million people, three seasons per year it was more than adequate to deal with 1 million natives, so people got used to having no traffic, ample parking everywhere, etc. Then one season per year you have 3 million people and you feel like you can barely move, as you wait an hour in traffic to creep 10 miles past some bottleneck like a bridge. But, as much as Mainers moaned about the tourists, they moaned even harder when high gas prices, bad weather, or some other change resulted in a low-tourism summer. That would plunge tens of thousands of Mainers into poverty, while demolishing the state government's budget for the year.

    It's probably different somewhere like, say, Manhattan or Munich, where there's a huge tourist trade side-by-side with a non-tourist economy that would provide a great income regardless. But in most places where there's a lot of tourism, those tourists are needed to support anything like the level of local population that lives there.

  8. #28
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    Ms. Helena,

    I am also surprised that 1. Italy is not on that list, and 2. Hungary is. Unless George Ezra is a huge influence.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by boontito View Post
    Re: the bold

    Completely true. For some of us, it takes a few visits to realize it though, as well as some time away from the recently seen wonder of the world. I much prefer semi-local destinations these days. Places I can get to within a couple of hours.
    Studies have suggested, though, that people are more satisfied after spending their money on experiences than spending them on things. That doesn't have to mean tourism, of course -- experiences could be a cooking class or concert. But tourist experiences count. And speaking from my own experience, I'm far happier, in retrospect, about the money I've spent touring the world than the money I've spent on stuff. For example, consider the difference between a $60,000 luxury vehicle and a $25,000 economy vehicle. Estimating a ten-year life for the vehicle, that's $3,500/year difference in cost. Think of the experiences that would finance!

    Just to give you an example, right now you can get a 7-night Alaska cruise on a nice Holland America ship starting at $346/person, which is inclusive of all your dining and plenty of on-board entertainment. Throw in $300 of airfare per person to get there, and you could pay for two such vacations per year for two people, with almost a thousand bucks left over for shore excursions. And that's not even the cheapest cruise option. There's a south-American/Caribbean cruise departing out of Panama, for seven days, starting at $299 per person.

    This is wildly off the topic, but I'm surprised people don't do cruises as an actual retirement living situation. Think about it: if you could average $299/person/7-days, 365 days would cost you less than $16,000 each, with all your food included. How many retirement communities cost that little -- much less ones with fine dining included, daily room service, a well-stocked gym, etc.

    There's another cruise departing Copenhagen, which is 24 nights starting at $1999. That would be a bit pricier, working out to just over $30,000 per year. But, again, all your food is included, plus lots of entertainment, daily room service, etc. That particular cruise cruise stops in Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Zeebrugge, Le Havre, Cherbourg, Southhampton, St. Peter Port, Edinburgh, Ivergordon, Talinn, St. Petersburg, Helsinki,k Stockholm, Warnemunde, and Kiel. Not a bad way to spend part of your retirement.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    I'm not sure this belongs here, but technology certainly has something to do with it. Without modern technologies, far fewer people would 1) travel abroad at all, or 2) concentrate at the relatively few chosen locations. I was intrigued by this article the other day:



    Artist ?edá?s novel way to highlight overtourism: hiring people to live in thronged ?eský Krumlov | Radio Prague

    Here are some recent figures:



    https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/news/...ng-overtourism

    I'm surprised Italy isn't in the top ten (for overtourism, needless to say) because Venice was the first city where I ever noticed tourists were a real problem, but I suppose the country as a whole doesn't have it that bad.
    Ms. Helena,

    It is about to get even worse. Heard a story today on the radio that the floodgates are about to open now that there is a huge, and I mean immense Chinese middleclass with money to spend.

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