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Thread: Overtourism

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    Praguematic Helena's Avatar
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    Overtourism

    I'm not sure this belongs here, but technology certainly has something to do with it. Without modern technologies, far fewer people would 1) travel abroad at all, or 2) concentrate at the relatively few chosen locations. I was intrigued by this article the other day:

    The Czech contribution to the Venice Architecture Biennale, which kicks off next weekend, is an offbeat social experiment from the leading Czech conceptual artist Kateřina Šedá. She is attempting to reintroduce normal life to popular destination Český Krumlov so as to generate debate on a major issue in today’s Europe: overtourism.

    Český Krumlov in South Bohemia has a population of around 13,000. But every year the small town is visited by around two million tourists.
    Artist ?edá?s novel way to highlight overtourism: hiring people to live in thronged ?eský Krumlov | Radio Prague

    Here are some recent figures:

    THE TOP 10 COUNTRIES FOR OVERTOURISM

    Croatia (57,587,000 tourists to 4,170,600 locals - 1380.78%)
    Iceland (1,891,000 tourists to 334,250 locals - 565.74%)
    Hungary (52,890,000 tourists to 9,817,960 locals - 538.71%)
    Denmark (28,692,000 tourists to 5,731,120 locals - 500.64%)
    France (202,930,000 tourists to 66,896,110 locals 303.35%)
    Czech Republic (30,915,000 tourists to 10,561,630 locals - 292.71%)
    Singapore (16,404,000 tourists to 5,607,280 locals - 292.55%)
    Cyprus (3,286,000 tourists to 1,170,130 locals - 280.82%)
    Greece (28,071,000 tourists to 10,746,740 locals - 261.20%)
    Spain (115,561,000 people to 46,443,960 locals - 248.82%)

    THE TOP 10 COUNTRIES FOR UNDERTOURISM

    Tanzania (1,284,000 tourists to 55,572,200 locals - 2.31%)
    Papua New Guinea (198,000 tourists to 8,084,990 locals - 2.45%)
    Kenya (1,340,000 tourists to 48,461,570 locals - 2.77%)
    Indonesia (11,519,000 people to 261,115,460 locals - 4.41%)
    Egypt (5,399,000 people to 95,688,680 locals - 5.64%)
    Mozambique (1,715,000 tourists to 28,829,480 locals - 5.95%)
    Iran (4,942,000 tourists to 80,277,430 locals 6.16%)
    Colombia (4,048,000 tourists to 48,653,420 locals - 8.32%)
    Sri Lanka (2,168,000 tourists to 21,203,000 locals - 10.22%)
    China (141,774,000 tourists to 1,378,665,000 locals - 10.28%)
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/news/...ng-overtourism

    I'm surprised Italy isn't in the top ten (for overtourism, needless to say) because Venice was the first city where I ever noticed tourists were a real problem, but I suppose the country as a whole doesn't have it that bad.
    Thanks from Blueneck, The Man and Dangermouse

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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    I'm not sure this belongs here, but technology certainly has something to do with it. Without modern technologies, far fewer people would 1) travel abroad at all, or 2) concentrate at the relatively few chosen locations. I was intrigued by this article the other day:



    Artist ?edá?s novel way to highlight overtourism: hiring people to live in thronged ?eský Krumlov | Radio Prague

    Here are some recent figures:



    https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/news/...ng-overtourism

    I'm surprised Italy isn't in the top ten (for overtourism, needless to say) because Venice was the first city where I ever noticed tourists were a real problem, but I suppose the country as a whole doesn't have it that bad.
    The key for a tourist to dealing with "overtourism" is simply to go in the off-season. For example, I've heard from many people that Venice is a nightmare, with such crowds that you can barely move in the tourist spots. My impression was totally different, having gone in mid-December. There were no lines, the hotels were cheap, the streets were pleasant for strolling, the restaurants were grateful for the business, etc. Similarly, my only experience with Athens is in March, and we practically had our run of the place -- and, unlike with Venice in Winter, the weather was absolutely gorgeous: sunny and mid-70s. I've also been in mid-March to Mallorca, Barcelona, Sorrento, Herculaneum, Olympia, Marseilles, Dubrovnik, the Lake Como region, Rome, Ancona, and a number of other Mediterranean spots. There were a manageable number of fellow tourists and the weather was much better than in the prime tourist season (when you can wind up sweating your nuts off if you're doing a lot of walking at mid-day). If you're going to be toting a backpack and putting in a few miles of walking in the sun, you really don't want anything warmer than the mid-60s through low-70s.... and in the Mediterranean, that's March.

    Time of day and day of the week also matter -- I lived in Munich for a year and saw how places that were occasionally stiflingly crowded, like the Marienplatz, would be practically vacant at other times, even during tourist season (early mornings, for example). The only places I've been to that felt overly crowded even mid-week, mornings, during their supposed off-season were Manhattan and Disneyworld.
    Thanks from Blueneck and Friday13

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    Senior Member Sparta's Avatar
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    ^a solution to overtourism for a tourist. Love it
    Thanks from NightSwimmer

  5. #5
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparta View Post
    ^a solution to overtourism for a tourist. Love it

    She's an invited tourist.

    That's different.

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    Praguematic Helena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arkady View Post
    The key for a tourist to dealing with "overtourism" is simply to go in the off-season. For example, I've heard from many people that Venice is a nightmare, with such crowds that you can barely move in the tourist spots. My impression was totally different, having gone in mid-December. There were no lines, the hotels were cheap, the streets were pleasant for strolling, the restaurants were grateful for the business, etc. Similarly, my only experience with Athens is in March, and we practically had our run of the place -- and, unlike with Venice in Winter, the weather was absolutely gorgeous: sunny and mid-70s. I've also been in mid-March to Mallorca, Barcelona, Sorrento, Herculaneum, Olympia, Marseilles, Dubrovnik, the Lake Como region, Rome, Ancona, and a number of other Mediterranean spots. There were a manageable number of fellow tourists and the weather was much better than in the prime tourist season (when you can wind up sweating your nuts off if you're doing a lot of walking at mid-day). If you're going to be toting a backpack and putting in a few miles of walking in the sun, you really don't want anything warmer than the mid-60s through low-70s.... and in the Mediterranean, that's March.

    Time of day and day of the week also matter -- I lived in Munich for a year and saw how places that were occasionally stiflingly crowded, like the Marienplatz, would be practically vacant at other times, even during tourist season (early mornings, for example). The only places I've been to that felt overly crowded even mid-week, mornings, during their supposed off-season were Manhattan and Disneyworld.
    Those are very good points and I agree, but my own selfish perspective is that of a native and permanent resident of one of the prime tourist spots. I can't (and don't want to) move away for the tourist season, which is most of the year here anyway. I have more thoughts (and feelings ) about this but not enough time to write a coherent post right now.
    Thanks from Dangermouse

  7. #7
    Senior Member Sparta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NightSwimmer View Post
    She's an invited tourist.

    That's different.
    Lol, as it should be!

  8. #8
    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparta View Post
    ^a solution to overtourism for a tourist. Love it
    Or a travel guide for people who hate to travel.

    The Accidental Tourist
    Thanks from Friday13

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    I prefer off-the-beaten-path destinations.

    It's tourism for tourists touring places no one should tour.

  10. #10
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    My former homeland, Abkhazia, has similar issues. 250,000 people live in Abkhazia, or thereabouts. Every summer season - about a million people arrive from Russia for vacation.

    Some famous beach towns there, like Gagra or Pitsunda, their population goes up 30 times during the vacation season!


    Not everyone likes it.

    Especially things like people in swimsuits taking photos in costumes resembling our Caucasian national clothes

    An insult, in some eyes...

    But most are ok with it. The tourists fuel Abkhazia economically, pretty much her big lifeline, as an unrecognized breakaway republic, otherwise...

    People rent them rooms in their houses

    and sell them stuff on the streets


    It has even led to whole new businesses popping up, like fast food restaurants

    and cell phone and bike rental shops

    Younger Russians are more sophisticated than the Soviet-raised generations, and demand these things.

    Nobody would have bothered to create such for the locals lol

    So, yeah, "overtourism" ain't always a bad thing
    Thanks from Friday13 and Ian Jeffrey

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