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Thread: We may already be engaged, with MASS EXTINCTION EVENT 6:

  1. #1
    Senior Member bobgnote's Avatar
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    We may already be engaged, with MASS EXTINCTION EVENT 6:

    We may already be experiencing MASS EXTINCTION EVENT 6.

    Since we are enduring global warming and climate change, die-offs and extinctions are evident. 5 mass extinction events have preceded out modern extinction event:

    Earth's five mass extinction events

    There have been five mass extinction events throughout Earth's history:

    The first great mass extinction event took place at the end of the Ordovician, when according to the fossil record, 60% of all genera of both terrestrial and marine life worldwide were exterminated.

    360 million years ago in the Late Devonian period, the environment that had clearly nurtured reefs for at least 13 million years turned hostile and the world plunged into the second mass extinction event.

    The fossil record of the end Permian mass extinction reveals a staggering loss of life: perhaps 80–95% of all marine species went extinct. Reefs didn't reappear for about 10 million years, the greatest hiatus in reef building in all of Earth history.

    The end Triassic mass extinction is estimated to have claimed about half of all marine invertebrates. Around 80% of all land quadrupeds also went extinct.

    The end Cretaceous mass extinction 65 million years ago is famously associated with the demise of the dinosaurs. Virtually no large land animals survived. Plants were also greatly affected while tropical marine life was decimated. Global temperature was 6 to 14°C warmer than present with sea levels over 300 metres higher than current levels. At this time, the oceans flooded up to 40% of the continents.

    What caused these mass extinctions? To find the major driver of coral extinction, Veron 2008 looks at the possible options and eliminates many as the primary cause. A meteorite strike is capable of creating huge dust clouds that lead to devastating darkness and cold. However, if this were the cause of coral reef extinction, 99% of the world's coral species would be wiped out in weeks or months. The fossil record shows coral extinction occurred over much longer periods.

    Warmer temperatures cause mass bleaching of corals. However, even in a warmer world, deep ocean temperatures would still remain well below surface temperatures and there would be safe havens where cooler water upwells from the deep ocean. That's not to say meteorites or global warming played no part in coral extinction - both have been contributing factors at various times. But they cannot fully explain the nature of coral extinctions as observed in the fossil record.


    What Veron 2008 found was each mass extinction event corresponded to periods of quickly changing atmospheric CO2. When CO2 changes slowly, the gradual increase allows mixing and buffering of surface layers by deep ocean sinks. Marine organisms also have time to adapt to the new environmental conditions. However, when CO2 increases abruptly, the acidification effects are intensified in shallow waters owing to a lack of mixing. It also gives marine life little time to adapt.

    So rate of change is a key variable in nature's ability to adapt. The current rate of change in CO2 levels has no known precedent. Oceans don't respond instantly to a CO2 build-up, so the full effects of acidification take decades to centuries to develop. This means we will have irretrievably committed the Earth to the acidification process long before its effects become anywhere near as obvious as those of mass bleaching today. If we continue business-as-usual CO2 emissions, ocean pH will eventually drop to a point at which a host of other chemical changes such as anoxia (an absence of oxygen) are expected. If this happens, the state of the oceans at the end Cretaceous 65 million years ago will become a reality and the Earth will enter the sixth mass extinction.

    We may ALREADY be engaged, with M.E.E.6.

    Dead zones in the oceans are already evident.

    Relatively acidic colder waters are creeping toward the tropics, from the poles. As ice melts, it decreases pH, of the surrounding waters.

    As perennial ice melts, we start to lose the northern ice albedo (reflectivity), so when that fails, one summer, a trend of absorption of more energy, during northern summers, will become established, which is a major tipping point, in the course of runaway global warming, toward climate change disasters.

    As the ice melts, the melts cool the oceans and the atmosphere, which with low relative solar intensity is why we don't have a hot-house planet, RIGHT NOW. The oceans are absorbing CO2, to become more acidic, which is why the destruction of forests hasn't caused CO2 to get higher, than 400 ppm, when 280 ppm is the normal Pleistocene-Holocene concentration maximum.

    CH4 (methane) is out-gassing, with more CO2, from warming lands and waters. When the northern polar ice fails, the oceans will start to warm, and they will start to fail, at re-cycling CO2, to H2CO3 and CaCO3.

    When the oceans begin to fail, at taking in fresh CO2, some seas will become caustic, other seas will become anoxic, and you can give up on sushi and shark fin soup. CO2 and still more CH4 will out-gas, even faster, from the warming oceans, while forests fail, from drought and related insect infestations.

    Our pine forests in North America are ready to burn, since they just went through droughts, which weakened them, so pine beetles have ravaged them.

    The cod and tuna are failing. Oyster larvae just had a big die-off, in the Pacific NW. The oceanic habitat will yield dominance, to jellyfish. As the waters warm, HS2 respirators will evolve, like they have, in past mass extinctions.

    Dying time is here.

    The failure of oceanic life forms will be more dramatic, before the land habitats fail.

    President black Obamney promised to prioritize global warming and climate change, 2008, 2010, and 2012. Since Willard Meat (white) Obamney won't have a sandwich and whip out his tax returns, the swing states are now polling, well, for the President, who may GET HIS CHANCE, to prioritize climate change.

    But imposing carbon credits on this problem, like black Obamney keeps advocating is like increasing the price of admission, to the HIV-infested bath-houses, which are now CLOSED.

    Fracking advocates have enjoyed complete relief, from regulation, but using natural gas, which releases sequestered carbon is like letting meth dealers get into the bath-houses, to sell cleaner crank, as if that will stop the problem, of shared needles and unprotected gay sex, in the now-closed bath-houses.

    Gee, thanks for the belated endorsement, of same-sex marriage, Mr.President. M.E.E.6 is here, like a slower-moving gay plague. What will it take, to get politicians, to see sense, LOUD DISCO?

  2. #2
    Senior Member bobgnote's Avatar
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    There have been 5 previous mass extinction events:

    BBC Nature - Big Five mass extinction events

    ---------------------

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/extincti...tinction_event

    1. Ordovician-Silurian mass extinction, 443 m.y.a.

    The third largest extinction in Earth's history, the Ordovician-Silurian mass extinction had two peak dying times separated by hundreds of thousands of years. During the Ordovician, most life was in the sea, so it was sea creatures such as trilobites, brachiopods and graptolites that were drastically reduced in number.

    BBC Nature - Late Devonian mass extinction videos, news and facts

    2. Late Devonian mass extinction, 359 m.y.a.

    Three quarters of all species on Earth died out in the Late Devonian mass extinction, though it may have been a series of extinctions over several million years, rather than a single event. Life in the shallow seas were the worst affected, and reefs took a hammering, not returning to their former glory until new types of coral evolved over 100 million years later.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/extincti...tinction_event

    3. Permian mass extinction, 248 m.y.a. (248-253 m.y.a.)

    The Permian mass extinction has been nicknamed The Great Dying, since a staggering 96% of species died out. All life on Earth today is descended from the 4% of species that survived.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/extincti...tinction_event

    4. Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction, 200 m.y.a.

    During the final 18 million years of the Triassic period, there were two or three phases of extinction whose combined effects created the Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction event. Climate change, flood basalt eruptions and an asteroid impact have all been blamed for this loss of life.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/extincti...tinction_event

    5. Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction, 65 m.y.a.

    The Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction - also known as the K/T extinction - is famed for the death of the dinosaurs. However, many other organisms perished at the end of the Cretaceous including the ammonites, many flowering plants and the last of the pterosaurs.

    Extinction event - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Are you READY, for Mass Extinction Event 6? Here it is!

  3. #3
    Senior Member bobgnote's Avatar
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    A bad place to be, HELL is not . . .
    This is from June 2001,, so somebody should have noticed we are in a gigantic version, of the gay bath-house scandal, by now:

    The Sixth Extinction (ActionBioscience)

    There is little doubt left in the minds of professional biologists that Earth is currently faced with a mounting loss of species that threatens to rival the five great mass extinctions of the geological past. As long ago as 1993, Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson estimated that Earth is currently losing something on the order of 30,000 species per year — which breaks down to the even more daunting statistic of some three species per hour. Some biologists have begun to feel that this biodiversity crisis — this “Sixth Extinction” — is even more severe, and more imminent, than Wilson had supposed.

    *

    How is the Sixth Extinction different from previous events?

    The current mass extinction is caused by humans.

    At first glance, the physically caused extinction events of the past might seem to have little or nothing to tell us about the current Sixth Extinction, which is a patently human-caused event. For there is little doubt that humans are the direct cause of ecosystem stress and species destruction in the modern world through such activities as:

    •transformation of the landscape
    •overexploitation of species
    •pollution
    •the introduction of alien species

    And because Homo sapiens is clearly a species of animal (however behaviorally and ecologically peculiar an animal), the Sixth Extinction would seem to be the first recorded global extinction event that has a biotic, rather than a physical, cause.

    We are bringing about massive changes in the environment.

    Yet, upon further reflection, human impact on the planet is a direct analogue of the Cretaceous cometary collision. Sixty-five million years ago that extraterrestrial impact — through its sheer explosive power, followed immediately by its injections of so much debris into the upper reaches of the atmosphere that global temperatures plummeted and, most critically, photosynthesis was severely inhibited — wreaked havoc on the living systems of Earth. That is precisely what human beings are doing to the planet right now: humans are causing vast physical changes on the planet.

    What is the Sixth Extinction?

    We can divide the Sixth Extinction into two discrete phases:

    •Phase One began when the first modern humans began to disperse to different parts of the world about 100,000 years ago.
    •Phase Two began about 10,000 years ago when humans turned to agriculture.

    Humans began disrupting the environment as soon as they appeared on Earth.

    The first phase began shortly after Homo sapiens evolved in Africa and the anatomically modern humans began migrating out of Africa and spreading throughout the world. Humans reached the middle east 90,000 years ago. They were in Europe starting around 40,000 years ago. Neanderthals, who had long lived in Europe, survived our arrival for less than 10,000 years, but then abruptly disappeared — victims, according to many paleoanthropologists, of our arrival through outright warfare or the more subtle, though potentially no less devastating effects, of being on the losing side of ecological competition.

    Everywhere, shortly after modern humans arrived, many (especially, though by no means exclusively, the larger) native species typically became extinct. Humans were like bulls in a China shop:

    •They disrupted ecosystems by overhunting game species, which never experienced contact with humans before.
    •And perhaps they spread microbial disease-causing organisms as well.

    The fossil record attests to human destruction of ecosystems:

    Wherever early humans migrated, other species became extinct.

    •Humans arrived in large numbers in North America roughly 12,500 years ago-and sites revealing the butchering of mammoths, mastodons and extinct buffalo are well documented throughout the continent. The demise of the bulk of the La Brea tar pit Pleistocene fauna coincided with our arrival.
    •The Caribbean lost several of its larger species when humans arrived some 8000 years ago.
    •Extinction struck elements of the Australian megafauna much earlier-when humans arrived some 40,000 years ago. Madagascar-something of an anomaly, as humans only arrived there two thousand years ago-also fits the pattern well: the larger species (elephant birds, a species of hippo, plus larger lemurs) rapidly disappeared soon after humans arrived.

    Indeed only in places where earlier hominid species had lived (Africa, of course, but also most of Europe and Asia) did the fauna, already adapted to hominid presence, survive the first wave of the Sixth Extinction pretty much intact. The rest of the world’s species, which had never before encountered hominids in their local ecosystems, were as naively unwary as all but the most recently arrived species (such as Vermilion Flycatchers) of the Galapagos Islands remain to this day.

    Why does the Sixth Extinction continue?

    The invention of agriculture accelerated the pace of the Sixth Extinction.

    Phase two of the Sixth Extinction began around 10,000 years ago with the invention of agriculture-perhaps first in the Natufian culture of the Middle East. Agriculture appears to have been invented several different times in various different places, and has, in the intervening years, spread around the entire globe.

    Agriculture represents the single most profound ecological change in the entire 3.5 billion-year history of life. With its invention:
    •humans did not have to interact with other species for survival, and so could manipulate other species for their own use
    •humans did not have to adhere to the ecosystem’s carrying capacity, and so could overpopulate

    Humans do not live with nature but outside it.

    Homo sapiens became the first species to stop living inside local ecosystems. All other species, including our ancestral hominid ancestors, all pre-agricultural humans, and remnant hunter-gatherer societies still extant exist as semi-isolated populations playing specific roles (i.e., have “niches”) in local ecosystems. This is not so with post-agricultural revolution humans, who in effect have stepped outside local ecosystems. Indeed, to develop agriculture is essentially to declare war on ecosystems - converting land to produce one or two food crops, with all other native plant species all now classified as unwanted “weeds” — and all but a few domesticated species of animals now considered as pests.

    The total number of organisms within a species is limited by many factors-most crucial of which is the “carrying capacity” of the local ecosystem: given the energetic needs and energy-procuring adaptations of a given species, there are only so many squirrels, oak trees and hawks that can inhabit a given stretch of habitat. Agriculture had the effect of removing the natural local-ecosystem upper limit of the size of human populations. Though crops still fail regularly, and famine and disease still stalk the land, there is no doubt that agriculture in the main has had an enormous impact on human population size:

    •Estimates vary, but range between 1 and 10 million people on earth 10,000 years ago.
    •There are now over 6 billion people.
    •The numbers continue to increase logarithmically — so that there will be 8 billion by 2020.
    •There is presumably an upper limit to the carrying capacity of humans on earth — of the numbers that agriculture can support — and that number is usually estimated at between 13-15 billion, though some people think the ultimate numbers might be much higher.

    This explosion of human population, especially in the post-Industrial Revolution years of the past two centuries, coupled with the unequal distribution and consumption of wealth on the planet, is the underlying cause of the Sixth Extinction. There is a vicious cycle:

    Overpopulation, invasive species, and overexploitation are fueling the extinction.

    •More lands are cleared and more efficient production techniques (most recently engendered largely through genetic engineering) to feed the growing number of humans — and in response, the human population continues to expand.
    •Higher fossil energy use is helping agriculture spread, further modifying the environment.
    •Humans continue to fish (12 of the 13 major fisheries on the planet are now considered severely depleted) and harvest timber for building materials and just plain fuel, pollution, and soil erosion from agriculture creates dead zones in fisheries (as in the Gulf of Mexico)
    •While the human Diaspora has meant the spread, as well, of alien species that more often than not thrive at the detriment of native species. For example, invasive species have contributed to 42% of all threatened and endangered species in the U.S.

    And just how smart, are humans, when confronted, with any of this?

    All these events were characterized, by dramatic increase, in CO2, so some CH4 (methane) was involved, during warming.

    Humans are either denying the warming is happening, denying the greenhouse effect, denying the effects of industry and chainsaws, denying we can re-green, or humans are proposing lame carbon credits or substitution of natural gas, for other sequestered carbon combustion media, which simply allow the basic problems, to continue.
    Last edited by bobgnote; 4th August 2012 at 11:53 AM.

  4. #4
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    Animals go extinct, it's a natural part of evolution.
    Thanks from Oscarb63 and Mordent

  5. #5
    Senior Member bobgnote's Avatar
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    From
    A bad place to be, HELL is not . . .
    This is from June 2001,, so somebody should have noticed we are in a gigantic version, of the gay bath-house scandal, by now:

    The Sixth Extinction (ActionBioscience)

    There is little doubt left in the minds of professional biologists that Earth is currently faced with a mounting loss of species that threatens to rival the five great mass extinctions of the geological past. As long ago as 1993, Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson estimated that Earth is currently losing something on the order of 30,000 species per year — which breaks down to the even more daunting statistic of some three species per hour. Some biologists have begun to feel that this biodiversity crisis — this “Sixth Extinction” — is even more severe, and more imminent, than Wilson had supposed.

    *

    How is the Sixth Extinction different from previous events?

    The current mass extinction is caused by humans.

    At first glance, the physically caused extinction events of the past might seem to have little or nothing to tell us about the current Sixth Extinction, which is a patently human-caused event. For there is little doubt that humans are the direct cause of ecosystem stress and species destruction in the modern world through such activities as:

    •transformation of the landscape
    •overexploitation of species
    •pollution
    •the introduction of alien species

    And because Homo sapiens is clearly a species of animal (however behaviorally and ecologically peculiar an animal), the Sixth Extinction would seem to be the first recorded global extinction event that has a biotic, rather than a physical, cause.

    We are bringing about massive changes in the environment.

    Yet, upon further reflection, human impact on the planet is a direct analogue of the Cretaceous cometary collision. Sixty-five million years ago that extraterrestrial impact — through its sheer explosive power, followed immediately by its injections of so much debris into the upper reaches of the atmosphere that global temperatures plummeted and, most critically, photosynthesis was severely inhibited — wreaked havoc on the living systems of Earth. That is precisely what human beings are doing to the planet right now: humans are causing vast physical changes on the planet.

    What is the Sixth Extinction?

    We can divide the Sixth Extinction into two discrete phases:

    •Phase One began when the first modern humans began to disperse to different parts of the world about 100,000 years ago.
    •Phase Two began about 10,000 years ago when humans turned to agriculture.

    Humans began disrupting the environment as soon as they appeared on Earth.

    The first phase began shortly after Homo sapiens evolved in Africa and the anatomically modern humans began migrating out of Africa and spreading throughout the world. Humans reached the middle east 90,000 years ago. They were in Europe starting around 40,000 years ago. Neanderthals, who had long lived in Europe, survived our arrival for less than 10,000 years, but then abruptly disappeared — victims, according to many paleoanthropologists, of our arrival through outright warfare or the more subtle, though potentially no less devastating effects, of being on the losing side of ecological competition.

    Everywhere, shortly after modern humans arrived, many (especially, though by no means exclusively, the larger) native species typically became extinct. Humans were like bulls in a China shop:

    •They disrupted ecosystems by overhunting game species, which never experienced contact with humans before.
    •And perhaps they spread microbial disease-causing organisms as well.

    The fossil record attests to human destruction of ecosystems:

    Wherever early humans migrated, other species became extinct.

    •Humans arrived in large numbers in North America roughly 12,500 years ago-and sites revealing the butchering of mammoths, mastodons and extinct buffalo are well documented throughout the continent. The demise of the bulk of the La Brea tar pit Pleistocene fauna coincided with our arrival.
    •The Caribbean lost several of its larger species when humans arrived some 8000 years ago.
    •Extinction struck elements of the Australian megafauna much earlier-when humans arrived some 40,000 years ago. Madagascar-something of an anomaly, as humans only arrived there two thousand years ago-also fits the pattern well: the larger species (elephant birds, a species of hippo, plus larger lemurs) rapidly disappeared soon after humans arrived.

    Indeed only in places where earlier hominid species had lived (Africa, of course, but also most of Europe and Asia) did the fauna, already adapted to hominid presence, survive the first wave of the Sixth Extinction pretty much intact. The rest of the world’s species, which had never before encountered hominids in their local ecosystems, were as naively unwary as all but the most recently arrived species (such as Vermilion Flycatchers) of the Galapagos Islands remain to this day.

    Why does the Sixth Extinction continue?

    The invention of agriculture accelerated the pace of the Sixth Extinction.

    Phase two of the Sixth Extinction began around 10,000 years ago with the invention of agriculture-perhaps first in the Natufian culture of the Middle East. Agriculture appears to have been invented several different times in various different places, and has, in the intervening years, spread around the entire globe.

    Agriculture represents the single most profound ecological change in the entire 3.5 billion-year history of life. With its invention:
    •humans did not have to interact with other species for survival, and so could manipulate other species for their own use
    •humans did not have to adhere to the ecosystem’s carrying capacity, and so could overpopulate

    Humans do not live with nature but outside it.

    Homo sapiens became the first species to stop living inside local ecosystems. All other species, including our ancestral hominid ancestors, all pre-agricultural humans, and remnant hunter-gatherer societies still extant exist as semi-isolated populations playing specific roles (i.e., have “niches”) in local ecosystems. This is not so with post-agricultural revolution humans, who in effect have stepped outside local ecosystems. Indeed, to develop agriculture is essentially to declare war on ecosystems - converting land to produce one or two food crops, with all other native plant species all now classified as unwanted “weeds” — and all but a few domesticated species of animals now considered as pests.

    The total number of organisms within a species is limited by many factors-most crucial of which is the “carrying capacity” of the local ecosystem: given the energetic needs and energy-procuring adaptations of a given species, there are only so many squirrels, oak trees and hawks that can inhabit a given stretch of habitat.

    Agriculture had the effect of removing the natural local-ecosystem upper limit of the size of human populations. Though crops still fail regularly, and famine and disease still stalk the land, there is no doubt that agriculture in the main has had an enormous impact on human population size:

    •Estimates vary, but range between 1 and 10 million people on earth 10,000 years ago.
    •There are now over 6 billion people.
    •The numbers continue to increase logarithmically — so that there will be 8 billion by 2020.
    •There is presumably an upper limit to the carrying capacity of humans on earth — of the numbers that agriculture can support — and that number is usually estimated at between 13-15 billion, though some people think the ultimate numbers might be much higher.

    This explosion of human population, especially in the post-Industrial Revolution years of the past two centuries, coupled with the unequal distribution and consumption of wealth on the planet, is the underlying cause of the Sixth Extinction. There is a vicious cycle:

    Overpopulation, invasive species, and overexploitation are fueling the extinction.

    •More lands are cleared and more efficient production techniques (most recently engendered largely through genetic engineering) to feed the growing number of humans — and in response, the human population continues to expand.
    •Higher fossil energy use is helping agriculture spread, further modifying the environment.
    •Humans continue to fish (12 of the 13 major fisheries on the planet are now considered severely depleted) and harvest timber for building materials and just plain fuel, pollution, and soil erosion from agriculture creates dead zones in fisheries (as in the Gulf of Mexico)
    •While the human Diaspora has meant the spread, as well, of alien species that more often than not thrive at the detriment of native species. For example, invasive species have contributed to 42% of all threatened and endangered species in the U.S.

    And just how smart, are humans, when confronted, with any of this?

    All these events were characterized, by dramatic increase, in CO2, so some CH4 (methane) was involved, during warming.

    Humans are either denying the warming is happening, denying the greenhouse effect, denying the effects of industry and chainsaws, denying we can re-green, or humans are proposing lame carbon credits or substitution of natural gas, for other sequestered carbon combustion media, which simply allow the basic problems, to continue.

    We cut our carbon footprint, get all the CO2-neutral biomass media we can, which is AT LEAST hemp, algae, and switchgrass, we re-green deserts and polluted areas, aggressively, or we will die, in droves.

    Now that Presidential candidate Willard Meat Obamney won't get out his tax returns, even if we remind him he showed 23 years worth, to John McCain, the swing states favor black Obamney.

    But can black Obamney quit hedging and fudging, while copying failed or out-right unconstitutional Democrat or Republican media? Black Obamney sure has a left-handed jumper, yo! What do you bet he finally figures out, how climate change is like the gay bath-house issue?

    WHEN SOMEBODY STICKS HIS NOSE IN IT AND RUBS IT AROUND, maybe!

  6. #6
    Senior Member bobgnote's Avatar
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    Humans get stupider, from breeding Darwin deniers and flat-earthers:

    Quote Originally Posted by Muninn View Post
    Animals go extinct, it's a natural part of evolution.
    Quote Originally Posted by bobgnote
    And just how smart, are humans, when confronted, with any of this?

    All these events were characterized, by dramatic increase, in CO2, so some CH4 (methane) was involved, during warming.

    Humans are either denying the warming is happening, denying the greenhouse effect, denying the effects of industry and chainsaws, denying we can re-green, or humans are proposing lame carbon credits or substitution of natural gas, for other sequestered carbon combustion media, which simply allow the basic problems, to continue.
    So. Do you read the other posts, before you flop a one-liner?

    The rate of extinctions is estimated, at 100 x normal, headed for 1000 x normal. THAT AIN'T NATURAL, at any point, in the Holocene Epoch, dude.

    The cleanout of species which is accelerating is due to HUMAN MISMANAGEMENT, OF THE EARTH'S ECO-SYSTEMS, which mismanagement has worsened, as human populations increased, logorithmically, despite modern, deadly, wasteful global wars. What kind of meds or street drugs does it take, to call any atrocious, human-affected outcomes, "natural?"

    CO2 normally peaks, at 280 ppm, but human industry and disruption of CO2 respiration and exchange has shot CO2 up to 400 ppm, where it seems headed, for 1000 or 2000 ppm. CH4 is now measured, in ppm, and it has a global warming potential, 72 times as great, as CO2, over a 20 year lifespan. Only there is going to be enough CH4, to use up hydroxyl ions, which help convert the CH4 to CO2 and H2O, so the 100 year GWP of CH4 will not be 24, but something between 24 and 72 times as effective, at GWP of CO2, which above 280 ppm is a pollutant.

    Do you sing, "Don't worry, be happy," in the shower, or something? The oceans are getting cleared out, first, so enjoy your sushi. M.E.E.6 won't be "natural." We are about 30,000 years or so removed, from "natural." We are a couple of hundred thousand years, from clearing the atmosphere, of CO2 buildup, for which HUMANS are responsible.

    The only thing "natural" about humans is their tendency, to devolve, from intelligent life-form, to some sort of stupid, naked ape, which can't make anything, but trouble.
    Last edited by bobgnote; 4th August 2012 at 12:16 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobgnote View Post
    So. Do you read the other posts, before you flop a one-liner?

    The rate of extinctions is estimated, at 100 x normal, headed for 1000 x normal.

    CO2 normally peaks, at 280 ppm, but human industry and disruption of CO2 respiration and exchange has shot CO2 up to 400 ppm, where it seems headed, for 1000 or 2000 ppm. CH4 is now measured, in ppm, and it has a global warming potential, 72 times as great, as CO2, over a 20 year lifespan. Only there is going to be enough CH4, to use up hydroxyl ions, which help convert the CH4 to CO2 and H2O, so the 100 year GWP of CH4 will not be 24, but something between 24 and 72 times as effective, at GWP of CO2, which above 280 ppm is a pollutant.

    Do you sing, "Don't worry, by happy," in the shower, or something? The oceans are getting cleared out, first, so enjoy your sushi.
    Global warming is real and it's man made. I do not buy into this fear campeign however. Literally every single species to ever walk the earth has, or will, go extinct.

  8. #8
    Senior Member bobgnote's Avatar
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    RealClimate: The Acid Ocean

    Let's check this 2005 oceanic acidification link in, since OA will be the first climate change disaster, to really send a lot of species, to oblivion.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muninn View Post
    Global warming is real and it's man made. I do not buy into this fear campeign however. Literally every single species to ever walk the earth has, or will, go extinct.
    Who mentioned "fear?" YOU did. YOU are entitled to become afraid, of something, but don't do it, for me.

    What "campeign?" (sic) You are correct, in sentence 3, since 99.5% of all species to ever "walk" or otherwise move around on Earth or in Earth's oceans or atmosphere have already gone extinct, and the rest will follow, including HUMANS. I don't understand why humans should be in such a greed-and-stupidity-fueled HURRY, to join the dodo bird and the other 99.5%ers.

    Since you introduced "fear," do you have a source for YOUR fear, or did rationale sort of take a break, on you? I don't usually bother much, with fear, here, since we are posting, at a nice forum, and a friend of the Devil is a friend of mine, etc.

    Scary people probably won't be walking through the door, so don't be scared, eh?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobgnote View Post
    ....President black Obamney promised to prioritize global warming and climate change, 2008, 2010, and 2012. Since Willard Meat (white) Obamney won't have a sandwich and whip out his tax returns, the swing states are now polling, well, for the President, who may GET HIS CHANCE, to prioritize climate change.

    But imposing carbon credits on this problem, like black Obamney keeps advocating is like increasing the price of admission, to the HIV-infested bath-houses, which are now CLOSED.

    Fracking advocates have enjoyed complete relief, from regulation, but using natural gas, which releases sequestered carbon is like letting meth dealers get into the bath-houses, to sell cleaner crank, as if that will stop the problem, of shared needles and unprotected gay sex, in the now-closed bath-houses.

    Gee, thanks for the belated endorsement, of same-sex marriage, Mr.President. M.E.E.6 is here, like a slower-moving gay plague. What will it take, to get politicians, to see sense.
    This guy sounded knowledgeable until he mixed in his racist and sexual politics. Next he'll be proposing emergency demographic solutions for non-white and non-conservative world populations to ensure adequate food supplies for survivors?
    Thanks from Oscarb63

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