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Thread: Epidemic Of HIgh-Risk HPV Infections In Americans

  1. #1
    Little Old Lady Madeline's Avatar
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    Epidemic Of HIgh-Risk HPV Infections In Americans

    During a recent two-year period, almost 23 percent of U.S. adults ages 18 to 59 had a type of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) that put them at high risk of certain cancers, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report published Thursday.

    That percentage jumped to more than 42 percent during 2013 to 2014 if any type of genital HPV was included, the CDC found. In both groups, prevalence was higher in men than in women, and it was sharply higher among blacks compared to other racial and ethnic groups.


    “We tend to overlook the fact that 20 percent of us are carrying the virus that can cause cancer,” said Geraldine McQuillan, lead author of the report and a senior infectious disease epidemiologist in the Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics. “People really need to realize that this is a serious concern.”

    HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. The CDC estimates that nearly 80 million people are currently infected and that about 14 million new infections occur annually among teenagers as well as adults. Most of these go away on their own, typically without even causing symptoms, but some HPV strains can lead to genital warts and cancer. Each year, 31,000 men and women are diagnosed with cancers caused by HPV — which, in most cases, would have been preventable with the HPV vaccine, according to the CDC.

    The CDC recommends HPV vaccinations for youth ages 11 to 12 so that they become protected before potential exposure to the virus through sexual contact. While vaccination rates have been increasing, they still lag for both boys and girls.

    Lingering misconceptions and fears are among the reasons for the lower HPV vaccine uptake, said Electra Paskett, a cancer control researcher at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. Some people still think vaccination encourages youth to become promiscuous. “The way [the vaccine] was introduced in Australia and the United Kingdom was as a cancer vaccine, which is truly what it is. It is a cancer vaccine,” Paskett said.

    The new CDC report also addresses oral HPV infections. From 2011 to 2014, their prevalence was 7 percent among people ages 18 to 69, it found. As with genital HPV, rates were higher for men than women overall and in all racial and ethnic groups. The same disparities also were found among those groups: Asians had the lowest rates and blacks had the highest rates.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.738f9fb3e487



    Not wanting to spread misinformation, I will just ask questions.

    Is the reduced fear of HIV causing Americans to use condoms less often?

    Are the cancers caused by HPV harder to treat?

    Can someone who has been exposed to HPV still get the vaccine?

    Are American doctors testing for HPV, in all ages, as a matter of routine?

    Your thoughts?

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    HPV is responsible for many types of cancer that have traditionally been blamed on other causes.

    Oral cancer among reasons doctors urge HPV vaccine for kids - Chicago Tribune

    When actor Michael Douglas told a reporter that his throat cancer was caused by HPV contracted through oral sex, two themes emerged that had nothing to do with celebrity gossip.

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    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline View Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.738f9fb3e487



    Not wanting to spread misinformation, I will just ask questions.

    Is the reduced fear of HIV causing Americans to use condoms less often?

    Are the cancers caused by HPV harder to treat?

    Can someone who has been exposed to HPV still get the vaccine?

    Are American doctors testing for HPV, in all ages, as a matter of routine?

    Your thoughts?
    Those stats have been around for years. Actually, 1 in 5 will have some strain of HPV. HPV shows up usually on a PAP smear because of cellular changes and there is a specific test for it. A condom is not as effective for HPV as it is for blood borne pathogens such as HIV...the condom may not cover the entire area and that could result in exposure. You also can pass it on using your hands because it sheds cells similar to the Herpes virus. Oral sex is becoming a problem as well. As far as the vaccine, once exposed or if you have had sex which increases your chances of exposure, they will not offer the vaccine. That is why young kids get them. Some strains disappear on their own, you can test positive and 2 years later it is gone. Not all strains result in genital warts...which is the strains that cause cancer. The virus can also lie dormant meaning you can be exposed in your younger years..but it not show up until years later. I have cathed elderly patients and saw warts as big as the end of your thumb.

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